Publications by authors named "Larisa Shirotova"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Antecedent stimulus control: using orienting cues to facilitate first-word acquisition for nonresponders with autism.

Behav Anal 2009 ;32(2):281-4

University of California at Santa Barbara.

Although considerable progress has been made in improving the acquisition of expressive verbal communication in children with autism, research has documented that a subpopulation of children still fail to acquire speech even with intensive intervention. One variable that might be important in facilitating responding for this nonverbal subgroup of children is the use of antecedent orienting cues. Using a multiple baseline design, this study examined whether individualized orienting cues could be identified, and whether their presentation would result in the production of verbal expressive words. The results showed that this antecedent stimulus control procedure produced improvements in responding to verbal models in all of the children, and subsequent gains in speech for some of the children. Theoretical and applied implications of orienting cues as they relate to antecedent stimulus control for children with autism are discussed.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2778808PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF03392190DOI Listing
August 2012

Brief report: using individualized orienting cues to facilitate first-word acquisition in non-responders with autism.

J Autism Dev Disord 2009 Nov 2;39(11):1587-92. Epub 2009 Jun 2.

Koegel Autism Center, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9490, USA.

Though considerable progress has been made in developing techniques for improving the acquisition of expressive verbal communication in children with autism, research has documented that 10-25% still fail to develop speech. One possible technique that could be significant in facilitating responding for this nonverbal subgroup of children is the use of orienting cues. Using a multiple baseline design, this study examined whether individualized orienting cues could be identified, and whether their presentation would result in verbal expressive words. The results suggest that using individualized orienting cues can increase correct responding to verbal models as well as subsequent word use. Theoretical and applied implications of orienting cues as they relate to individualized programming for children with autism are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10803-009-0765-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2759868PMC
November 2009