Publications by authors named "Lamis Al Harby"

10 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Lag Time between Onset of First Symptom and Treatment of Retinoblastoma: An International Collaborative Study of 692 Patients from 10 Countries.

Cancers (Basel) 2021 Apr 19;13(8). Epub 2021 Apr 19.

Department of Ophthalmology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA.

Background: The relationship between lag time and outcomes in retinoblastoma (RB) is unclear. In this study, we aimed to study the effect of lag time between onset of symptoms and diagnosis of retinoblastoma (RB) in countries based on their national-income and analyse its effect on the outcomes.

Methods: We performed a prospective study of 692 patients from 11 RB centres in 10 countries from 1 January 2019 to 31 December 2019.

Results: The following factors were significantly different among different countries based on national-income level: age at diagnosis of RB ( = 0.001), distance from home to nearest primary healthcare centre ( = 0.03) and mean lag time between detection of first symptom to visit to RB treatment centre ( = 0.0007). After adjusting for country income, increased lag time between onset of symptoms and diagnosis of RB was associated with higher chances of an advanced tumour at presentation ( < 0.001), higher chances of high-risk histopathology features ( = 0.003), regional lymph node metastasis ( < 0.001), systemic metastasis ( < 0.001) and death ( < 0.001).

Conclusions: There is a significant difference in the lag time between onset of signs and symptoms and referral to an RB treatment centre among countries based on national income resulting in significant differences in the presenting features and clinical outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/cancers13081956DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8073369PMC
April 2021

Prospective validation of a virtual clinic pathway in the management of choroidal naevi: the NAEVUS study Report no. 1: safety assessment.

Br J Ophthalmol 2020 Oct 9. Epub 2020 Oct 9.

Moorfields Ophthalmic Reading Centre, NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at Moorfields Eye Hospital and UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, London, UK

Background: Choroidal naevi are a common incidental finding prompting specialist referrals to ocular oncology. Rarely, such lesions have sufficient suspicious features to diagnose a small melanoma. The aim of the study is to show that 'virtual' imaging-based pathways are a safe and efficient option to manage such referrals.

Methods: A prospective cohort study at the Manchester Royal Eye Hospital and Moorfields Eye Hospital between June 2016 and July 2017 of the management decision of 400 patients reviewed by an ophthalmologist in a face-to-face consultation (gold standard) supported by fundus photography, optical coherence tomography, autofluorescence (AF) and B-mode ultrasound. The images were also read independently by blinded graders (non-medical) and blinded ophthalmologists, and a management decision was made based on image review alone (virtual pathway). The two pathways were compared for safety.

Results: The agreement for management decisions between face-to-face and virtual pathways was 83.1% (non-medical) and 82.6% (medical). There were more over-referrals in the virtual pathway (non-medical 24.3%, medical 23.3% of gold standard discharge) and only two under-referrals (10.5% of gold standard referrals), both borderline cases with minimal clinical risk. The agreement for risk factors of growth (orange pigment, subretinal fluid, hyper-AF) ranged between 82.3% and 97.3%.

Conclusions: We prospectively validated a virtual clinic model for the safe management of choroidal naevi. Such a model of care is feasible with low rate of under-referral. An over-referral rate of almost 24% from the vitrual pathway needs to be factored into designing such pathways in conjunction with evidence on their cost-effectiveness.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bjophthalmol-2020-317371DOI Listing
October 2020

Travel burden and clinical presentation of retinoblastoma: analysis of 1024 patients from 43 African countries and 518 patients from 40 European countries.

Br J Ophthalmol 2020 Sep 15. Epub 2020 Sep 15.

Pediatric Oncology Unit, Hospital Universitario y Politécnico La Fe, Valencia, Spain.

Background: The travel distance from home to a treatment centre, which may impact the stage at diagnosis, has not been investigated for retinoblastoma, the most common childhood eye cancer. We aimed to investigate the travel burden and its impact on clinical presentation in a large sample of patients with retinoblastoma from Africa and Europe.

Methods: A cross-sectional analysis including 518 treatment-naïve patients with retinoblastoma residing in 40 European countries and 1024 treatment-naïve patients with retinoblastoma residing in 43 African countries.

Results: Capture rate was 42.2% of expected patients from Africa and 108.8% from Europe. African patients were older (95% CI -12.4 to -5.4, p<0.001), had fewer cases of familial retinoblastoma (95% CI 2.0 to 5.3, p<0.001) and presented with more advanced disease (95% CI 6.0 to 9.8, p<0.001); 43.4% and 15.4% of Africans had extraocular retinoblastoma and distant metastasis at the time of diagnosis, respectively, compared to 2.9% and 1.0% of the Europeans. To reach a retinoblastoma centre, European patients travelled 421.8 km compared to Africans who travelled 185.7 km (p<0.001). On regression analysis, lower-national income level, African residence and older age (p<0.001), but not travel distance (p=0.19), were risk factors for advanced disease.

Conclusions: Fewer than half the expected number of patients with retinoblastoma presented to African referral centres in 2017, suggesting poor awareness or other barriers to access. Despite the relatively shorter distance travelled by African patients, they presented with later-stage disease. Health education about retinoblastoma is needed for carers and health workers in Africa in order to increase capture rate and promote early referral.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bjophthalmol-2020-316613DOI Listing
September 2020

Detecting Progression of Melanocytic Choroidal Tumors by Sequential Imaging: Is Ultrasonography Necessary?

Cancers (Basel) 2020 Jul 10;12(7). Epub 2020 Jul 10.

Ocular Oncology Service, Moorfields Eye Hospital, London EC1V 2PD, UK.

To determine if ultrasonography is necessary to detect progression of choroidal melanocytic tumors undergoing sequential multi-modal imaging with color photography, autofluorescence (AF) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). All patients with choroidal melanoma undergoing treatment at Moorfields Eye Hospital between January 2016 and March 2020 were reviewed to identify those with treatment deferred by ≥2 months. Tumors that showed progression prior to treatment, defined as an increase in (a) basal dimensions (b) thickness (c) orange pigment and/or (d) sub-retinal fluid, were included. Mushroom shape, Orange pigment, Large size, Enlargement and Sub-retinal fluid (MOLES) scores were assigned to all tumors at earliest date and date of treatment. A total of 99 patients with a mean age of 66 years (range: 26-90) were included. The initial MOLES score was 1 in 2 cases, 2 in 23 cases, and ≥3 in 74 cases. Progression was detected with sequential color photography alone in 100% of MOLES 1/2 and 97% of lesions with a MOLES score of ≥3. When findings on AF and OCT were included, sensitivity for detecting subtle change without ultrasonography improved to 100% for MOLES 3 and 97% for MOLES 4/5. Only one patient included in this study had an isolated increase in thickness that may have been missed had sequential ultrasonography not been performed. Overall, the sensitivity for detecting progression with color photographs alone was 97% (95% CI 93-100%) and increased to 99% (95% CI 97-100%) by including autofluorescence and OCT. Monitoring of choroidal nevi, particularly those classified as MOLES 1 or 2 (i.e., low-risk or high-risk naevi), can be accomplished safely without the need for ultrasonography. The findings of this study may remove barriers to the implementation of tele-oncology clinics for the monitoring of choroidal melanocytic tumors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/cancers12071856DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7408899PMC
July 2020

The MOLES System for Planning Management of Melanocytic Choroidal Tumors: Is It Safe?

Cancers (Basel) 2020 May 21;12(5). Epub 2020 May 21.

Ocular Oncology Service, Moorfields Eye Hospital, London EC1V 2PD, UK.

Purpose: To evaluate the MOLES system for identifying malignancy in melanocytic choroidal tumors in patients treated for choroidal melanoma.

Methods: Records of 615 patients treated for choroidal melanoma between January 2017 and December 2019 were reviewed. Patients were excluded if iris and/or ciliary body involvement (106 patients), inadequate fundus photography (26 patients), no images available for review (21 patients) and/or treatment was not primary (11 patients). Demographic data and AJCC TNM Stage were collected. Color fundus and autofluorescence photographs (FAF), optical coherence tomography (OCT) and B-scan ultrasounds were prospectively reviewed. MOLES scores were assigned according to five criteria: mushroom shape, orange pigment, large size, enlarging tumor and subretinal fluid.

Results: A total of 451 patients (mean age, 63.9 ± 13.9 years) were included. At treatment, mean largest basal tumor diameter (LBD) and thickness were10.3 ± 2.8 mm (range, 3.0-23.0) and 4.3 mm (range, 1.0-17.0). All but one (0.2%) had MOLES scores of ≥3. Eighty-two patients were treated after surveillance lasting a mean of 1.5 years. Initially, most (63/82; 76.8%) had a MOLES score ≥ 3. Importantly, none of the 451 tumors had a score of <2, and as such, the MOLES protocol would have indicated referral to an ocular oncologist for 100% of patients.

Conclusion: The MOLES scoring system is a sensitive (99.8%) tool for indicating malignancy in melanocytic choroidal tumors (MOLES ≥ 3). If the examining practitioner can recognize the five features suggestive of malignancy, MOLES is a safe tool to optimize referral of melanocytic choroidal tumors for specialist care.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/cancers12051311DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7281649PMC
May 2020

Global Retinoblastoma Presentation and Analysis by National Income Level.

JAMA Oncol 2020 05;6(5):685-695

Imam Hussein Cancer Center, Karbala, Iraq.

Importance: Early diagnosis of retinoblastoma, the most common intraocular cancer, can save both a child's life and vision. However, anecdotal evidence suggests that many children across the world are diagnosed late. To our knowledge, the clinical presentation of retinoblastoma has never been assessed on a global scale.

Objectives: To report the retinoblastoma stage at diagnosis in patients across the world during a single year, to investigate associations between clinical variables and national income level, and to investigate risk factors for advanced disease at diagnosis.

Design, Setting, And Participants: A total of 278 retinoblastoma treatment centers were recruited from June 2017 through December 2018 to participate in a cross-sectional analysis of treatment-naive patients with retinoblastoma who were diagnosed in 2017.

Main Outcomes And Measures: Age at presentation, proportion of familial history of retinoblastoma, and tumor stage and metastasis.

Results: The cohort included 4351 new patients from 153 countries; the median age at diagnosis was 30.5 (interquartile range, 18.3-45.9) months, and 1976 patients (45.4%) were female. Most patients (n = 3685 [84.7%]) were from low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Globally, the most common indication for referral was leukocoria (n = 2638 [62.8%]), followed by strabismus (n = 429 [10.2%]) and proptosis (n = 309 [7.4%]). Patients from high-income countries (HICs) were diagnosed at a median age of 14.1 months, with 656 of 666 (98.5%) patients having intraocular retinoblastoma and 2 (0.3%) having metastasis. Patients from low-income countries were diagnosed at a median age of 30.5 months, with 256 of 521 (49.1%) having extraocular retinoblastoma and 94 of 498 (18.9%) having metastasis. Lower national income level was associated with older presentation age, higher proportion of locally advanced disease and distant metastasis, and smaller proportion of familial history of retinoblastoma. Advanced disease at diagnosis was more common in LMICs even after adjusting for age (odds ratio for low-income countries vs upper-middle-income countries and HICs, 17.92 [95% CI, 12.94-24.80], and for lower-middle-income countries vs upper-middle-income countries and HICs, 5.74 [95% CI, 4.30-7.68]).

Conclusions And Relevance: This study is estimated to have included more than half of all new retinoblastoma cases worldwide in 2017. Children from LMICs, where the main global retinoblastoma burden lies, presented at an older age with more advanced disease and demonstrated a smaller proportion of familial history of retinoblastoma, likely because many do not reach a childbearing age. Given that retinoblastoma is curable, these data are concerning and mandate intervention at national and international levels. Further studies are needed to investigate factors, other than age at presentation, that may be associated with advanced disease in LMICs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamaoncol.2019.6716DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7047856PMC
May 2020

Primary photodynamic therapy with verteporfin for pigmented posterior pole cT1a choroidal melanoma: a 3-year retrospective analysis.

Br J Ophthalmol 2018 12 13;102(12):1705-1710. Epub 2018 Feb 13.

Ocular Oncology Service, Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.

Aims: To investigate the outcomes of primary photodynamic therapy (PDT) for pigmented posterior pole cT1a choroidal melanoma.

Methods: Retrospective interventional consecutive case series of 26 patients (26 eyes) with pigmented posterior pole cT1a choroidal melanoma, who were treated with 3 sessions of PDT and followed-up thereafter.

Results: Included were 11 males and 15 females that presented at a median age of 66 years (mean: 64) with transformed naevi (n=11) or suspicious lesions (n=15) with ≥3 risk factors for growth, with lipofuscin in all. In all cases, diagnosis was clinically based (no tissue biopsy). Tumour control was achieved in 16 (62%) patients in a median follow-up time of 29 months (mean: 27). Ten patients failed treatment by form of radial expansion, diagnosed in a median time of 13 months (mean: 12) from last treatment. By Kaplan-Meier analysis, success rate after 1, 2 and 3 years was 85%, 59% and 51%, respectively. On statistical analysis, number of suspicious features was found to be the only risk factor predicting failure (P=0.046). One patient developed macula-sparing branch retinal artery occlusion after treatment. Following PDT, subretinal fluid resolved in all cases and visual acuity significantly improved in all treatment-success cases (P=0.043). There were no cases of metastatic spread.

Conclusion: Primary PDT resulted in tumour regression of small, pigmented choroidal melanoma in 62% after a mean of 27 months. Treatment was more effective in tumours with three or less risk factors for growth, and resulted with fluid elimination and significant improvement in vision in treatment-success cases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bjophthalmol-2017-311747DOI Listing
December 2018

Implantation pearl cyst after uncomplicated clear cornea phacoemulsification mimicking an iris tumour.

Can J Ophthalmol 2018 02 21;53(1):e10-e13. Epub 2017 Jul 21.

Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom; Ocular Oncology Service, St. Bartholomew's Hospital, London, United Kingdom; UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, London, United Kingdom. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcjo.2017.06.008DOI Listing
February 2018

Rare tumors: an eye on the future.

Future Oncol 2015 Oct 8;11(19):2641-2644. Epub 2015 Sep 8.

Department of Oncology, Imperial College, London, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fon.15.212DOI Listing
October 2015
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