Publications by authors named "Laetitia Rabayrol"

7 Publications

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Ovarian cancer patients at high risk of BRCA mutation: the constitutional genetic characterization does not change prognosis.

Fam Cancer 2016 10;15(4):497-506

Department of Medical Oncology, Institut Paoli-Calmettes, 232 Boulevard Sainte-Marguerite, 13273, Marseille Cedex 09, France.

Ovarian neoplasms secondary to germline BRCA mutations had been described to have a more favourable survival. There is only few data concerning the prognosis of non mutated patients presenting clinical features evocative of BRCA alterations. We retrospectively collected data from patients treated in our institution for an invasive ovarian carcinoma between 1995 and 2011. Patients considered at high risk of BRCA mutation were tested for BRCA1/2 germline mutations. We described clinical, pathological and therapeutic features and compared prognosis of BRCA mutation carriers and non-mutated patients. Out of 617 ovarian cancer patients, we identified 104 patients who were considered at high risk of mutation. The 33 mutated patients were more likely to present a personal (33 vs. 10 %, p = 0.003) or a family (42 vs. 24 %, p = 0.06) history of breast/ovarian cancers. BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and wild type patients displayed similar prognosis: median progression-free survival (PFS) of 20.9 versus 37.7 months (p = 0.21); median overall survival (OS) of 151.2 versus 122.5 months (p = 0.52). Personal history of breast cancer increased both PFS [HR = 0.45 (95CI 0.25-0.81)] and OS [HR = 0.35 (95CI 0.16-0.75)]. In multivariate analysis, this parameter was an independent prognostic feature, whereas the identification of a BRCA1/2 mutation was not. In our cohort, all patients at high risk of BRCA mutation share a similar prognosis, whatever is their germline mutation status. Prognosis seems to be more influenced by clinical history than by germline mutations identification. If it is confirmed in larger and independent series, this result suggests that the hypothesis of other BRCA pathway alterations (BRCAness phenotype) deserves to be deeply explored.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10689-016-9873-9DOI Listing
October 2016

Prediction of BRCA1 germ-line mutation status in patients with breast cancer using histoprognosis grade, MS110, Lys27H3, vimentin, and KI67.

Pathobiology 2013 23;80(5):219-27. Epub 2013 Apr 23.

Department of Cancer Genetics/CIC-P Inserm 9502, Paoli Calmettes Institute, University of Aix-Marseille II, Marseille, France.

Family structure, lack of reliable information, cost, and delay are usual concerns when deciding to perform BRCA analyses. Testing breast cancer tissues with four antibodies (MS110, lys27H3, vimentin, and KI67) in addition to grade evaluation enabled us to rapidly select patients for genetic testing identification. We constituted an initial breast cancer tissue microarray, considered as a learning set, comprising 27 BRCA1 and 81 sporadic tumors. A second independent validation set of 28 BRCA1 tumors was matched to 28 sporadic tumors using the same original conditions. We investigated morphological parameters and 21 markers by immunohistochemistry. A logistic regression model was used to select the minimal number of markers providing the best model to predict BRCA1 status. The model was applied to the validation set to estimate specificity and sensibility. In the initial set, univariate analyses identified 11 markers significantly associated with BRCA1 status. Then, the best multivariate model comprised only grade 3, MS110, Lys27H3, vimentin, and KI67. When applied to the validation set, BRCA1 tumors were correctly classified with a sensitivity of 83% and a specificity of 81%. The performance of this model was superior when compared to other profiles. This study offers a new rapid and cost-effective method for the prescreening of patients at high risk of being BRCA1 mutation carriers, to guide genetic testing, and finally to provide appropriate preventive measures, advice, and treatments including targeted therapy to patients and their families.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000339432DOI Listing
January 2014

Molecular study of the perforin gene in familial hematological malignancies.

Hered Cancer Clin Pract 2011 Sep 21;9(1). Epub 2011 Sep 21.

Département d'Oncologie Génétique, de Prévention et Dépistage, Institut Paoli-Calmettes, 232 Boulevard Sainte Marguerite, Marseille, 13009, France.

Perforin gene (PRF1) mutations have been identified in some patients diagnosed with the familial form of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) and in patients with lymphoma. The aim of the present study was to determine whether patients with a familial aggregation of hematological malignancies harbor germline perforin gene mutations. For this purpose, 81 unrelated families from Tunisia and France with aggregated hematological malignancies were investigated. The variants detected in the PRF1 coding region amounted to 3.7% (3/81). Two of the three variants identified were previously described: the p.Ala91Val pathogenic mutation and the p.Asn252Ser polymorphism. A new p.Ala 211Val missense substitution was identified in two related Tunisian patients. In order to assess the pathogenicity of this new variation, bioinformatic tools were used to predict its effects on the perforin protein structure and at the mRNA level. The segregation of the mutant allele was studied in the family of interest and a control population was screened. The fact that this variant was not found to occur in 200 control chromosomes suggests that it may be pathogenic. However, overexpression of mutated PRF1 in rat basophilic leukemia cells did not affect the lytic function of perforin differently from the wild type protein.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1897-4287-9-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3197553PMC
September 2011

Acceptability of cancer chemoprevention trials: impact of the design.

Int J Med Sci 2008 Aug 22;5(5):244-7. Epub 2008 Aug 22.

Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Department of Oncogenetics Prevention and Screening Marseille France.

Background: Chemoprevention could significantly reduce cancer burden. Assessment of efficacy and risk/benefit balance is at best achieved through randomized clinical trials.

Methods: At a periodic health examination center 1463 adults were asked to complete a questionnaire about their willingness to be involved in different kinds of preventive clinical trials.

Results: Among the 851 respondents (58.2%), 228 (26.8%) agreed to participate in a hypothetical chemoprevention trial aimed at reducing the incidence of lung cancer and 116 (29.3%) of 396 women agreed to a breast cancer chemoprevention trial. Randomization would not restrain participation (acceptability rate: 87.7% for lung cancer and 93.0% for breast cancer). In these volunteers, short-term trials (1 year) reached a high level of acceptability: 71.5% and 73.7% for lung and breast cancer prevention respectively. In contrast long-term trials (5 years or more) were far less acceptable: 9.2% for lung cancer (OR=7.7 CI(95%) 4.4-14.0) and 10.5 % for breast cancer (OR=6.9 CI(95%) 3.2-15.8). For lung cancer prevention, the route of administration impacts on acceptability with higher rate 53.1% for a pill vs. 7.9% for a spray (OR=6.7 CI(95%) 3.6-12.9).

Conclusion: Overall healthy individuals are not keen to be involved in chemo-preventive trials, the design of which could however increase the acceptability rate.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2528072PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.7150/ijms.5.244DOI Listing
August 2008

Moesin expression is a marker of basal breast carcinomas.

Int J Cancer 2007 Oct;121(8):1779-85

Laboratory of Molecular Oncology, Marseille Cancer Research Institute, UMR599 Inserm/Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Marseille, France.

Basal breast cancers (BBCs) have a high risk of metastasis, recurrence and death. Formal subtype definition relies on gene expression but can be approximated by protein expression. New markers are needed to help in the management of the basal subtype of breast cancer. In a previous transcriptional analysis of breast cell lines we found that Moesin expression was a potential basal marker. We show here that Moesin protein expression is a basal marker in breast tumors. In a tissue microarray (TMA) containing 547 sporadic breast cancers, of which 108 were profiled for gene expression, Moesin was expressed in 31% of all tumors and in 82% of the basal tumors. To confirm that Moesin expression remained associated with the basal phenotype in specific types of BBCs, we analyzed Moesin expression in 2 other TMAs containing 40 medullary breast cancers (MBCs) and 27 BRCA1-associated breast cancers (BRCA1-BCs), respectively. Moesin was strongly expressed in MBCs (87%; p = 2.4 x 10(-5)) and in BRCA1-BCs (58%; p = 1.3 x 10(-5)) as compared with non-MBCs and sporadic cases. Moesin-expressing tumors display features of BBCs, such as high proliferation rate, hormone receptors negativity, expression of putative basal/myoepithelial markers (CAV1, CD10, CK5/6, CK14, EGFR, P53, P-cadherin and SMA). Survival analysis showed a reduced specific survival and metastasis-free survival in Moesin-expressing tumors by log-rank test (p(SS) = 0.014 and p(MFS) = 0.014). In multivariate analysis, Moesin expression was nearly an independent prognostic marker of poor outcome as shown by Cox proportional hazard model in patients without lymph node metastasis (p = 0.052, HR = 2.38, CI 95[0.99-5.69]).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.22923DOI Listing
October 2007

Behavioral and economic impact of a familial history of cancers.

Fam Cancer 2005 ;4(4):307-11

Institute Paoli-Calmettes-INSERM UMR, Marseille, France.

Background: Misunderstanding of cancer screening recommendations or messages and confidence in the predictive value of positive familial history of disease may converge to stimulate an over-utilization of screening tests in oncology by patients who perceive themselves to be at high risk.

Methods: A survey looking for predictors of the uptake of five cancer screening tests (mammography, colonoscopy, Fecal Occult Blood Test, upper digestive tract endoscopy and chest X-ray) was carried out on 4000 healthy adults (mean age 46.4 years).

Findings: Based on the results of a multivariate analysis, the survey enlightens the existing relationships between familial history and increasing uptake of medical cancer screening tests, with OR ranging from 1.3 (IC 1.0-1.6) for chest X-ray to 3.0 (IC 2.1-4.1) for colonoscopy. In France (60 million inhabitants), a conservative assessment of the annual net number of unhelpful screening tests attributable to positive family history of related cancer with chest X-ray and Upper digestive tract endoscopy lead to a figure of 7000 and 7800 tests respectively corresponding to a total annual cost of more than Euro 7, million.

Interpretation: Clearer messages about hereditary risks and transparency about the efficacy of screening tests are required in order to decrease over utilization of screening tests and their related costs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10689-005-3143-6DOI Listing
March 2006

Typical medullary breast carcinomas have a basal/myoepithelial phenotype.

J Pathol 2005 Nov;207(3):260-8

Marseille Cancer Institute, Molecular Oncology Department, UMR599 INSERM and Paoli-Calmettes Institute, Marseille, France.

Medullary breast cancer (MBC) is a rare, diagnostically difficult, pathological subtype. Despite being high grade, it has a good prognosis. MBC patients have an excess of BRCA1 germ-line mutation and reliable identification of MBC could help to identify patients at risk of carrying germline BRCA1 mutations or in whom chemotherapy could be avoided. The aim of this study was therefore to improve diagnosis by establishing an MBC protein expression profile using immunohistochemistry (IHC) on tissue-microarrays (TMA). Using a series of 779 breast carcinomas ('EC' set), diagnosed initially as MBC, a double-reading session was carried out by several pathologists on all of the histological material to establish the diagnosis as firmly as possible using a 'medullary score'. Only MBCs with high scores, i.e. typical MBC (TMBC) (n=44) and non-TMBC grade III with no or low scores (n=160), were included in the IHC study. To validate the results obtained on this first set, a control series of TMBC (n=17) and non-MBC grade III cases (n=140) ('IPC' set) was studied. The expression of 18 proteins was studied in the 61 TMBCs and 300 grade III cases from the two sets. The global intra-observer concordance of the first reading for the diagnosis of TMBC was 94%, with almost perfect kappa (kappa) of 0.815. TMBC was characterized by a high degree of basal/myoepithelial differentiation. In multivariate analysis with logistic regression, TMBC was defined by the association of P-cadherin (R=2.29), MIB1 > 50 (R=3.80), ERBB2 negativity (R=2.24) and p53 positivity (RR=1.45).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/path.1845DOI Listing
November 2005