Publications by authors named "Laetitia Longfier"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Effect of Internet use for searching information on vaccination on the uptake of human papillomavirus vaccine in France: A path-analysis approach.

Prev Med 2021 Aug 11;149:106615. Epub 2021 May 11.

INSERM CIC 1417, F-CRIN, I REIVAC, Assistance Publique- Hôpitaux de Paris, Hôpital Cochin, Paris, France; Université de Paris, Faculté de médecine Paris Descartes, Paris, France.

Internet is a popular source of information regarding vaccination. This study aimed to determine whether there is a negative association between Internet use among French vaccine-hesitant mothers and HPV vaccine uptake by their daughters, and to gain insight into the pathways that would link Internet use to the lack of HPV vaccine uptake. We conducted a pooled cross-sectional analysis across the 2015, 2016, 2017 and 2018 Vaccinoscopie® Survey. Multivariate logistic regression and path models were used in the analysis. The study sample included a total of 2038 respondent mothers. Of those, 89 (4.4%) declared having never been in the situation of searching for information regarding a vaccination they had hesitated about, leaving 1949 mothers for the present analysis. Approximately 24% (466/1949) of the mothers declared using the Internet as a source of vaccine information. In multivariate logistic regression adjusted for physician recommendation of HPV vaccination, attitudes towards vaccines in general, perception of HPV vaccine usefulness, maternal level of education, region of residence, and the survey year, the use of Internet by the mothers was significantly associated with a lower HPV vaccination among their daughters (adjusted odds ratio (aOR), 0.66; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.47-0.91). Path analysis further confirmed the negative effect of Internet use (β = -0.10, standard error (SE) = 0.02, P < 0.0001), highlighting how the Internet plays a detrimental role in HPV vaccine uptake through a lower perceived level of HPV vaccine usefulness, a lower perceived level of information on childhood vaccination, and unfavorable attitudes towards vaccination in general.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2021.106615DOI Listing
August 2021

Emotional expressiveness of 5-6 month-old infants born very premature versus full-term at initial exposure to weaning foods.

Appetite 2016 12 1;107:494-500. Epub 2016 Sep 1.

Psychology and Neuroscience of Cognition and Emotion (EA 4700), University of Normandy, Rouen, France. Electronic address:

Facial expressions of 5-6 month-old infants born preterm and at term were compared while tasting for the first time solid foods (two fruit and two vegetable purées) given by the mother. Videotapes of facial reactions to these foods were objectively coded during the first six successive spoons of each test food using Baby FACS and subjectively rated by naïve judges. Infant temperament was also assessed by the parents using the Infant Behaviour Questionnaire. Contrary to our expectations, infants born preterm expressed fewer negative emotions than infants born full-term. Naïve judges rated infants born preterm as displaying more liking than their full-term counterparts when tasting the novel foods. The analysis of facial expressions during the six spoonfuls of four successive meals (at 1-week intervals) suggested a familiarization effect with the frequency of negative expressions decreasing after tasting the second spoon, regardless of infant age, type of food and order of presentation. Finally, positive and negative dimensions of temperament reported by the parents were related with objective and subjective coding of affective reactions toward foods in infants born preterm or full-term. Our research indicates that premature infants are more accepting of novel foods than term infants and this could be used for supporting the development of healthy eating patterns in premature infants. Further research is needed to clarify whether reduced negativity by infants born prematurely to the exposure to novel solid foods reflects a reduction of an adaptive avoidant behaviour during the introduction of novel foods.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2016.08.124DOI Listing
December 2016