Publications by authors named "L M Kearney"

261 Publications

Infant Care Practices, Caregiver Awareness of Safe Sleep Advice and Barriers to Implementation: A Scoping Review.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2022 Jun 23;19(13). Epub 2022 Jun 23.

Department of Paediatrics: Child and Youth Health, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, Grafton, Auckland 1023, New Zealand.

Modifiable infant sleep and care practices are recognised as the most important factors parents and health practitioners can influence to reduce the risk of sleep-related infant mortality. Understanding caregiver awareness of, and perceptions relating to, public health messages and identifying trends in contemporary infant care practices are essential to appropriately inform and refine future infant safe sleep advice. This scoping review sought to examine the extent and nature of empirical literature concerning infant caregiver engagement with, and implementation of, safe sleep risk-reduction advice relating to Sudden Unexpected Deaths in Infancy (SUDI). Databases including PubMed, CINAHL, Scopus, Medline, EMBASE and Ovid were searched for relevant peer reviewed publications with publication dates set between January 2000-May 2021. A total of 137 articles met eligibility criteria. Review results map current infant sleeping and care practices that families adopt, primary infant caregivers' awareness of safe infant sleep advice and the challenges that families encounter implementing safe sleep recommendations when caring for their infant. Findings demonstrate a need for ongoing monitoring of infant sleep practices and family engagement with safe sleep advice so that potential disparities and population groups at greater risk can be identified, with focused support strategies applied.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19137712DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9265757PMC
June 2022

A prospective cohort study comparing neonatal outcomes of waterbirth and land birth in an Australian tertiary maternity unit.

Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol 2022 Jul 7. Epub 2022 Jul 7.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Sunshine Coast Hospital and Health Service, Birtinya, Queensland, Australia.

Background: Maternal preference for warm water immersion (WWI) and waterbirth is increasing, but adoption into obstetric guidelines and clinical practice remains limited. Concerns regarding safety and a paucity of evidence have been cited as reasons for the limited adoption and uptake.

Aim: The aim was to investigate maternal and neonatal outcomes after WWI and/or waterbirth compared with land birth.

Materials And Methods: A prospective cohort study was conducted in an Australian public maternity hospital between 2019 and 2020. Maternal and neonatal outcomes for 1665 women who had a vaginal birth were studied. Primary outcome was admission to the neonatal unit (NNU). Secondary outcomes included neonatal antibiotic administration, maternal intrapartum fever, epidural use and perineal injury. Multivariate logistical regression analyses compared the outcomes between three groups: waterbirth, WWI only and land birth.

Results: NNU admissions for a suspected infectious condition were significantly higher in the land birth group (P = 0.035). After accounting for labour duration, epidural use and previous birth mode, no significant difference was detected between groups in the odds of NNU admission (P = 0.167). No babies were admitted to NNU with water inhalation or drowning. Women birthing on land were more likely to be febrile (2 vs 0%; P = 0.007); obstetric anal sphincter injury and postpartum haemorrhage were similar between groups. Regional analgesia use was significantly lower in the WWI group compared to the land birth group (21.02 vs 38.58%; P = <0.001). There was one cord avulsion in the waterbirth group (0.41%).

Conclusion: Maternal and neonatal outcomes were similar between groups, with no increased risk evident in the waterbirth and WWI groups.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ajo.13555DOI Listing
July 2022

Barriers and Facilitators to Engaging Mothers and Fathers in Family-Based Interventions: A Qualitative Systematic Review.

Child Psychiatry Hum Dev 2022 Jun 28. Epub 2022 Jun 28.

School of Health in Social Science, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK.

The current systematic review examined the similarities and differences between mothers' and fathers' reported barriers and facilitators to engaging in family-based interventions for child and adolescent behavioural problems (aged 2-17 years). Systematic searches of six electronic databases and grey literature alongside a two-way screening process identified twenty eligible qualitative studies from 2004 to 2019. A thematic meta-synthesis identified similarities in major themes of psychological, situational, knowledge/awareness, programme/intervention, co-parenting, practitioner, and beliefs/attitudes factors, alongside group experiences and stages of engagement. However, differences emerged in subthemes related to parental, treatment, and service delivery factors that included individual ideologies of parenting, parental roles, and treatment participation; the role of mothers in facilitating engagement; and individual preferences for treatment content and delivery. Overall, findings suggest that while mothers and fathers experience similar challenges to engagement, they can also experience distinct challenges which need to be addressed at the treatment outset to maximise engagement.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10578-022-01389-6DOI Listing
June 2022

Integrated review of the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of maternity health care professionals concerning umbilical cord clamping.

Birth 2022 May 18. Epub 2022 May 18.

University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

Background: Umbilical cord clamp timing has implications for newborn health, which include increased iron stores up to 6 months of age. National and International cord clamping guidelines differ as do health professionals' practices. The rationale for differences in cord clamping practice is unclear.

Aims And Objective: Studies on the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of maternity health care professionals about cord clamp timing were synthesized. Similarities and differences between professional groups and understanding of the optimal timing of cord clamp timing for term newborns were compared.

Methods: An integrative review was undertaken. PubMed, Scopus, MIDIRS, CINAHL, and Google Scholar were searched. Publication date limits were set between January 2007 and December 2020. Quality appraisal was undertaken using the Critical Appraisal Skills Program (CASP) tools.

Results: Eighteen studies met inclusion criteria, as they included primary research studies that investigated maternity health care professionals' knowledge, attitudes, and practices about umbilical cord clamping, and were written in English. Four main subject areas were identified: a) knowledge of optimal cord clamp timing; b) attitudes and perceptions of early vs deferred cord clamping; c) cord clamping practice; and d) rationale for cord clamping practice.

Conclusions: Different attitudes and practices were identified between midwifery and medical professionals in relation to cord clamp timing together with health professional knowledge and practice gaps pertaining to optimal cord clamp timing. Contemporary evidence should inform guidelines for clinical practice and be embedded into maternity health professional curricula and professional development programs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/birt.12647DOI Listing
May 2022

Legally involved individuals in state hospitals and community mental health settings: Introduction to the special section.

Psychol Serv 2022 May;19(2):201-205

Department of Psychiatry.

Over the past several years, individuals with serious mental illness (SMI) have become involved with the legal system at an increasing rate. State psychiatric hospitals and community mental health programs have seen a high number of referrals and admissions at a time when resources and staffing have been challenges. Individuals with SMI continue to be highly represented among those incarcerated in jails and prisons, often for minor charges. This article serves as an introduction to a special section of Psychological Services on innovations in assessment and treatment of legally involved patients in state hospitals and community mental health settings. Data are presented on the prevalence of legal involvement among individuals with serious mental illness, including the exponential growth in individuals evaluated and found incompetent to stand trial. A brief summary of the articles in the special section is presented, broken down by themes of assessment, treatment, and policy. We hope that the studies described in this issue will lead to further exploration of problems, barriers, and potential solutions for individuals with SMI who become involved with the legal system. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ser0000671DOI Listing
May 2022
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