Publications by authors named "L Ercilio C Faria"

286 Publications

Monitoring environmental conditions on the speed of development and larval migration of gastrointestinal nematodes in Urochloa decumbens in northeastern Brazil.

Vet Parasitol Reg Stud Reports 2022 Jun 16;31:100732. Epub 2022 Apr 16.

Curso de Pós-graduação em Ciência Animal, Centro de Ciências Agrárias, Ambientais e Biológicas, Universidade Federal do Recôncavo da Bahia, Cruz das Almas CEP 44380-000, BA, Brazil. Electronic address:

The study aimed to evaluate the speed of development of gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) eggs to infective larvae (L3) and its migration under effect of meteorological variables: temperature, rainfall, relative humidity, solar radiation to Urochloa (=Brachiaria) decumbens grass pasture during rainy season, from June to September 2019, and dry season, October to March 2020, in Recôncavo baiano region of Bahia state, Brazil. Monthly, fecal samples obtained from goats with recurrent GIN infection were deposited in six plots of one square meter. In +7, +14 and + 21-days post-deposition, lower and upper strata grass (0-15 and > 15 cm, respectively) and remaining feces were collected and submitted to Baermann's technique modified to perform larval count and identification. Meteorological data were obtained from a local weather station database. The log-transformed larval count results were analyzed regarding the collection day effect, stratum effect, comparing the means by Tukey's test (p < 0.05). Multivariate regression analysis and correlation of meteorological variables with larval counts was performed. In the rainy season, the largest proportion of recovered L3 was concentrated in +7-days post-deposition in the months of June and July, both in the remaining feces and herbage samples, while in August development took place more slowly, after +14-days post-deposition. During the dry season, L3 development only occurred after the first collection in January and February. Lower strata had higher proportion of recovery than in upper strata. Negative correlation was found for solar radiation. Greater rainfall in the rainy season compared to dry season was a favorable condition for high contamination of grass samples. However, reduced vertical migration to upper strata may have been influenced by low temperatures during the rainy season. Regarding the genera present in the fecal samples used in the experiment were found Haemonchus sp., Trichostrongylus sp. and Oesophagostomum sp. Thus, it is possible to conclude that in the region of the study, during the rainy season, there is a rapid larval development and the L3 are able to migrate more effectively to the grass. On the other hand, in the dry season, larval development tends to be slower, with less migration to the grass. Solar radiation can be useful for predicting months with the highest risk of infection. Therefore, prophylactic measures should be employed in goat herds during the rainy season whilst natural reduced pasture contamination in the dry season may favor animal maintenance for a longer time.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vprsr.2022.100732DOI Listing
June 2022

Gastric cancer screening: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Scand J Gastroenterol 2022 May 9:1-11. Epub 2022 May 9.

Gastroenterology Department, Instituto Português de Oncologia do Porto, Porto, Portugal.

Background And Aims: Gastric cancer (GC) screening is recommended in high-risk populations, although screening methods and intervals vary. In intermediate-risk populations, screening through esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) may be considered depending on local resources. The aim of this study was to compare GC screening methods regarding effect on mortality, diagnostic yield and adherence.

Methods: Systematic review and meta-analysis including studies evaluating population-based GC screening. Search was conducted in three online databases (MEDLINE, Scopus and clinicaltrials.gov), along with manual search.

Results: Forty-four studies were included. Studies in upper gastrointestinal series (UGIS) demonstrated that GC screening was associated with significantly lower GC mortality rates (OR 0.63, 95% CI 0.55 - 0.73). Benefits on mortality were also found in EGD and serum pepsinogen (PG) studies. EGD was associated with significantly higher GC (0.55%, 95% CI 0.39 - 0.75%) and early-GC (EGC) detection rates (0.48%, 95% CI 0.34 - 0.65%) when compared to UGIS (GC 0.19%, 95% CI 0.10 - 0.31%; EGC 0.08%, 95% CI 0.04 - 0.13%) and PG (GC 0.10%, 95% CI 0.05 - 0.16%; EGC 0.10%, 95% CI 0.04 - 0.19%). Non-invasive methods tended to higher adherence rates when compared to EGD. Regardless of the screening method, individualized recruitment performed better.

Discussion: Screening positively impacted GC mortality rates. EGD was associated with higher diagnostic yield, while UGIS and PG tended to higher adherence rates. Screening uptake was predominantly impacted by recruitment strategies independently of the adopted method.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00365521.2022.2068966DOI Listing
May 2022

Extensive pulmonary embolism as complication of oligosymptomatic COVID-19: case report.

J Vasc Bras 2021 24;20:e20200239. Epub 2021 Sep 24.

Hospital Estadual Ferreira Machado, Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ, Brasil.

Although the pathophysiology of coagulopathy associated with the 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is not well known, occurrence of pulmonary embolism (PE) is frequently observed. However, few cases have been described in the literature in which patients who had asymptomatic COVID-19, with no risk factors for venous thromboembolism (VTE), presented extensive acute PE. We report the case of a patient with asymptomatic COVID-19, complicated by deep vein thrombosis and later by extensive acute PE, suggesting that these conditions should be systematically considered, even in asymptomatic COVID-19 patients with no known risk factors for VTE.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/1677-5449.200239DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9045534PMC
September 2021

NEOTROPICAL FRESHWATER FISHES: A dataset of occurrence and abundance of freshwater fishes in the Neotropics.

Ecology 2022 Apr 27:e3713. Epub 2022 Apr 27.

Laboratório de Ecologia, Pesca e Ictiologia, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Palotina, Brazil.

The Neotropical region hosts 4,225 freshwater fish species, ranking first among the world's most diverse regions for freshwater fishes. Our NEOTROPICAL FRESHWATER FISHES data set is the first to produce a large-scale Neotropical freshwater fish inventory, covering the entire Neotropical region from Mexico and the Caribbean in the north, to the southern limits in Argentina, Paraguay, Chile and Uruguay. We compiled 185,787 distribution records, with unique georeferenced coordinates, for 4,225 species, represented by occurrence and abundance data. The number of species for the most numerous orders are: Characiformes (1,289), Siluriformes (1,384), Cichliformes (354), Cyprinodontiformes (245) and Gymnotiformes (135). The most recorded species was the characid Astyanax fasciatus (4,696 records). We registered 116,802 distribution records for native species, compared to 1,802 distribution records for non-native species. The main aim of the NEOTROPICAL FRESHWATER FISHES data set was to make these occurrence and abundance data accessible for international researchers to develop ecological and macroecological studies, from local to regional scales, with focal fish species, families and/or orders. We anticipate that the NEOTROPICAL FRESHWATER FISHES data set will be valuable for studies on a wide range of ecological processes, such as trophic cascades, fisheries pressure, the effects of habitat loss and fragmentation, and the impacts of species invasion and climate change. There are no copyright restrictions on the data, and please cite this data paper when using the data in publications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.3713DOI Listing
April 2022

Impact of prone positioning on patients with COVID-19 and ARDS on invasive mechanical ventilation: a multicenter cohort study.

J Bras Pneumol 2022 20;48(2):e20210374. Epub 2022 Apr 20.

. Departamento de Fisioterapia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo (SP) Brasil.

Objective: To identify factors that lead to a positive oxygenation response and predictive factors of mortality after prone positioning.

Methods: This was a retrospective, multicenter, cohort study involving seven hospitals in Brazil. Inclusion criteria were being > 18 years of age with a suspected or confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19, being on invasive mechanical ventilation, having a PaO2/FIO2 ratio < 150 mmHg, and being submitted to prone positioning. After the first prone positioning session, a 20 mmHg improvement in the PaO2/FIO2 ratio was defined as a positive response.

Results: The study involved 574 patients, 412 (72%) of whom responded positively to the first prone positioning session. Multiple logistic regression showed that responders had lower Simplified Acute Physiology Score III (SAPS III)/SOFA scores and lower D-dimer levels (p = 0.01; p = 0.04; and p = 0.04, respectively). It was suggested that initial SAPS III and initial PaO2/FIO2 were predictors of oxygenation response. The mortality rate was 69.3%. Increased risk of mortality was associated with age (OR = 1.04 [95 CI: 1.01-1.06]), time to first prone positioning session (OR = 1.18 [95 CI: 1.06-1.31]), number of sessions (OR = 1.31 [95% CI: 1.00-1.72]), proportion of pulmonary impairment (OR = 1.55 [95% CI: 1.02-2.35]), and immunosuppression (OR = 3.83 [95% CI: 1.35-10.86]).

Conclusions: Our results show that most patients in our sample had a positive oxygenation response after the first prone positioning session. However, the mortality rate was high, probably due to the health status and the number of comorbidities of the patients, as well as the severity of their disease. Our results also suggest that SAPS III and the initial PaO2/FIO2 predict the oxygenation response; in addition, age, time to first prone positioning, number of sessions, pulmonary impairment, and immunosuppression can predict mortality.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.36416/1806-3756/e20210374DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9064626PMC
April 2022
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