Publications by authors named "L A Tell"

186 Publications

Pharmacokinetic Parameters and Tissue Withdrawal Intervals for Sheep Administered Multiple Oral Doses of Meloxicam.

Animals (Basel) 2021 Sep 25;11(10). Epub 2021 Sep 25.

Department of Veterinary Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95616, USA.

Meloxicam is an anti-inflammatory drug used to treat pain and inflammation in ruminants including sheep, and pharmacokinetic studies are needed to protect the food supply from drug residues after use in food-producing animals. This study estimated plasma pharmacokinetic parameters and meat withdrawal intervals (WDI) for market sheep after multiple daily oral doses of meloxicam. Single and multiple dose plasma pharmacokinetic studies, a multi-dose tissue depletion study, and a follow-up study to investigate if events prior to slaughter were associated with differences in plasma meloxicam concentrations, all using sample data collected after completion of dosing, were completed. Using regulatory agency methods for calculating withdrawal times, an estimated WDI of at least 10 d following the last dose is recommended for market lambs treated with 10 daily oral 1 mg/kg doses of meloxicam tablets suspended in water. The effect of events surrounding slaughter on plasma meloxicam concentrations in lambs is unknown but should be considered if plasma samples are obtained immediately prior to or during the slaughter process and used for pharmacokinetic investigations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ani11102797DOI Listing
September 2021

Editorial: Aquatic Pharmacology-Temperature Sensitive Medication.

Front Vet Sci 2021 28;8:755585. Epub 2021 Sep 28.

Department of Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fvets.2021.755585DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8505992PMC
September 2021

LOW PREVALENCE OF HAEMOSPORIDIANS IN BLOOD AND TISSUE SAMPLES FROM HUMMINGBIRDS.

J Parasitol 2021 Sep;107(5):794-798

Department of Biology, 1600 Holloway Avenue, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, California 94132.

Hummingbirds are vital members of terrestrial ecosystems, and because of their high metabolic requirements, they serve as indicators of ecosystem health. Monitoring the parasitic infections of hummingbirds is thus especially important. Haemosporidians, a widespread group of avian blood parasites, are known to infect hummingbirds, but little is known about the prevalence and diversity of these parasites in hummingbirds. The prevalence of haemosporidians in several hummingbird species was examined and we compared 4 different tissue types in detecting parasites by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Blood samples from 339 individuals of 3 different hummingbird species were tested, and 4 individuals were found positive for haemosporidian infection, a prevalence of 1.2%. Hummingbird carcasses (n = 70) from 5 different hummingbird species were also sampled to assess differences in detection success of haemosporidians in heart, kidney, liver, and pectoral muscle tissue samples. Detection success was similar among tissue types, with haemosporidian prevalence of 9.96% in heart tissue, 9.52% in kidney tissue, 10.76% in liver tissue, and 11.76% in pectoral muscle tissue. All tissue samples positive for haemosporidian infection were from the Black-chinned Hummingbird (Archilochus alexandri). Possible reasons for low prevalence of these blood parasites could include low susceptibility to insect vectors or parasite incompatibility in these hummingbirds.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1645/20-168DOI Listing
September 2021

Assessing Backyard Poultry Versus Small Animal Knowledge of Veterinary Students Regarding Husbandry, Prescription Drug Use, and Antimicrobial Resistance.

J Vet Med Educ 2021 Aug 10:e20210044. Epub 2021 Aug 10.

As backyard poultry (BYP) ownership has increased in the US, the demand for veterinarians who treat BYP has also increased. However, veterinarians who treat BYP remain scarce and are mostly small animal veterinarians and exotic animal practitioners who have limited training in food animal regulatory practices. To gauge whether veterinary students are interested in learning more about BYP and what BYP topics to include in an online training program for veterinary students, a BYP knowledge assessment was conducted. Pre-clinical veterinary students were asked to self-rate their level of knowledge on various topics for both small animal practice and BYP using Likert-type ordinal scales. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests of those Likert data showed significant differences ( < .01 at α = .05) between self-assessed knowledge of poultry and small animal medicine for all surveyed topics. Specifically, veterinary students ranked themselves as less knowledgeable on poultry concepts than on small animal medicine concepts. Nevertheless, students expressed interest in an online training program for treating BYP and drug residue avoidance in BYP, despite having chosen future career tracks that are not exclusively poultry. Specific topics students expressed interest in with respect to BYP training included anatomy, husbandry, prescribing medications, treatment options, food safety, antimicrobial resistance, and extra-label drug use.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/jvme-2021-0044DOI Listing
August 2021
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