Publications by authors named "Kwanseop Lee"

27 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Non-Pathological Opacification of the Cavernous Sinus on Brain CT Angiography: Comparison with Flow-Related Signal Intensity on Time-of-Flight MR Angiography.

Healthcare (Basel) 2021 Jan 18;9(1). Epub 2021 Jan 18.

Department of Pathology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Seoul 14068, Korea.

: To investigate the non-pathological opacification of the cavernous sinus (CS) on brain computed tomography angiography (CTA) and compare it with flow-related signal intensity (FRSI) on time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (TOF-MRA). : Opacification of the CS was observed in 355 participants who underwent CTA and an additional 77 participants who underwent examination with three diagnostic modalities: CTA, TOF-MRA, and digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Opacification of the CS, superior petrosal sinus (SPS), inferior petrosal sinus (IPS), and pterygoid plexus (PP) were also analyzed using a five-point scale. The Wilcoxon test was used to determine the frequencies of the findings on each side. Additionally, the findings on CTA images were compared with those on TOF-MRA images in an additional 77 participants without dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) using weighted kappa (κ) statistics. : Neuroradiologists identified non-pathological opacification of the CS ( = 100, 28.2%) on brain CTA in 355 participants. Asymmetry of opacification in the CS was significantly correlated with the grade difference between the right and left CS, SPS, IPS, and PP ( < 0.0001 for CS, < 0.0001 for SPS, < 0.0001 for IPS, and < 0.05 for PP). Asymmetry of the opacification and FRSI in the CS was observed in 77 participants (CTA: = 21, 27.3%; TOF-MRA: = 22, 28.6%). However, there was almost no agreement between CTA and TOF-MRA ( = 0.10, 95% confidence interval: -0.12-0.32). : Asymmetry of non-pathological opacification and FRSI in the CS may be seen to some extent on CTA and TOF-MRA due to anatomical variance. However, it shows minimal reliable association with the FRSI on TOF-MRA.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9010094DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7830214PMC
January 2021

Determination of optimum pixel size and slice thickness for tractography and ulnar nerve diffusion tensor imaging at the cubital tunnel using 3T MRI.

Acta Radiol 2020 Aug 27:284185120951965. Epub 2020 Aug 27.

Department of Radiology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea.

Background: Small peripheral nerve tractography is challenging because of the trade-off among resolution, image acquisition time, and signal-to-noise ratio.

Purpose: To optimize pixel size and slice thickness parameters for fiber tractography and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the ulnar nerve at the cubital tunnel using 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

Material And Methods: Fifteen healthy volunteers (mean age 30 ± 6.8 years) were recruited prospectively. Axial T2-weighted and DTI scans were acquired, covering the cubital tunnel, using different pixel sizes and slice thicknesses. Three-dimensional (3D) nerve tractography was evaluated for the median number and length of the reconstructed fiber tracts and visual score from 0 to 5. Two-dimensional (2D) cross-sectional DTI was evaluated for fractional anisotropy (FA) values throughout the length of the ulnar nerve.

Results: A pixel size of 1.3 mm revealed the highest number of reconstructed nerve fibers compared to that of 1.1 mm ( = 0.048), with a good visual score. A slice thickness of 4 mm had the highest number of reconstructed nerve fibers and visual score compared with other thicknesses (all  < 0.05). In 2D cross-sectional images, the median FA values were in the range of 0.40-0.63 at the proximal, central, and distal portions of the cubital tunnel. Inter-observer agreement for all parameters was good to excellent.

Conclusion: For fiber tractography and DTI of the ulnar nerve at the cubital tunnel, optimal image quality was obtained using a 1.3-mm pixel size and 4-mm slice thickness under MR parameters of this study at 3T.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0284185120951965DOI Listing
August 2020

Impact of respiratory motion on liver stiffness measurements according to different shear wave elastography techniques and region of interest methods: a phantom study.

Ultrasonography 2021 Jan 12;40(1):103-114. Epub 2020 Apr 12.

Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Korea.

Purpose: This study quantified the impact of respiratory motion on liver stiffness measurements according to different shear wave elastography (SWE) techniques and region of interest (ROI) methods, using liver fibrosis phantoms.

Methods: Three operators measured stiffness values in four phantoms with different stiffness on a moving platform with two SWE techniques (point-SWE [pSWE] and 2-dimensional SWE [2D-SWE]), three types of motion (static mode and moving mode at low and high speeds), and four ROI methods in 2D-SWE (circle, point, box, and multiple). The circular ROI method was used to compare the two SWE techniques. The occurrence of technical failure and unreliable measurements, stiffness values, and measurement time were evaluated.

Results: Technical failure was observed only in moving mode for pSWE and 2D-SWE (n=1 for both). Unreliable measurements were also only observed in moving mode and were significantly less common in 2D-SWE (n=1) than in pSWE (n=12) (P<0.001). No statistically significant differences in the technical failure rate or stiffness values were noted between the static and moving modes for both SWE techniques. The technical failure and unreliable measurement rates were not significantly different among the ROI methods for 2D-SWE. Stiffness values did not differ significantly according to the ROI method used in any moving mode. However, the multiple ROI method had significantly shorter measurement times than the circular ROI method for all moving modes.

Conclusion: 2D-SWE may be preferable for evaluating liver fibrosis in patients with poor breath-hold. Furthermore, 2D-SWE with multiple ROIs enables rapid measurements, without affecting liver stiffness values.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.14366/usg.19079DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7758106PMC
January 2021

Comparison of point and 2-dimensional shear wave elastography for the evaluation of liver fibrosis.

Ultrasonography 2020 Jul 6;39(3):288-297. Epub 2020 Mar 6.

Department of Statistics and Institute of Statistics, Hallym University, Chuncheon, Korea.

Purpose: This study aimed to assess the technical performance of ElastQ Imaging compared with ElastPQ and to investigate the correlation between liver stiffness (LS) values obtained using these two techniques.

Methods: This retrospective study included 249 patients who underwent LS measurements using both ElastPQ and ElastQ Imaging equipped on the same machine. The applicability, repeatability (coefficient of variation [CV]), acquisition time, and LS values were compared using the chi-square or Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. In the development group, the correlation between the LS values obtained by the two techniques was assessed with Spearman correlation coefficients and linear regression analysis. In the validation group, the agreement between the estimated and real LS values was evaluated using a Bland-Altman plot.

Results: ElastQ Imaging had higher applicability (94.0% vs. 78.3%, P<0.001) and higher repeatability, with a lower median CV (0.127 vs. 0.164, P<0.001) than did ElastPQ. The median acquisition time of ElastQ Imaging was significantly shorter than that of ElastPQ (45.5 seconds vs. 96.5 seconds, P<0.001). The median LS value obtained using ElastQ Imaging was significantly higher than that obtained using ElastPQ (5.60 kPa vs. 5.23 kPa, P<0.001). The LS values between the two techniques exhibited a strong positive correlation (r=0.851, P<0.001) in the development group. The mean difference and 95% limits of agreement were 0.0 kPa (-3.9 to 3.9 kPa) in the validation group.

Conclusion: ElastQ Imaging may be more reliable and faster than ElastPQ, with strongly correlated LS measurements.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.14366/usg.19090DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7315295PMC
July 2020

The most mentioned neuroimaging articles in online media: a bibliometric analysis of the top 100 articles with the highest Altmetric Attention Scores.

Acta Radiol 2019 Dec 1;60(12):1680-1686. Epub 2019 May 1.

Department of Neurology, Kangdong Seong-Sim Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0284185119843226DOI Listing
December 2019

Quantitative analysis of cochlear signal intensity on three-dimensional and contrast-enhanced fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images in patients with Meniere's disease: Correlation with the pure tone audiometry test.

J Neuroradiol 2019 Sep 3;46(5):307-311. Epub 2019 Apr 3.

Department of Pathology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang-si, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to correlate the quantitative analysis of cochlear signal intensity (SI) on 3-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (3D-FLAIR) and contrast-enhanced (CE) 3D-FLAIR images with results of the pure tone audiometry (PTA) test in patients with Meniere's disease (MD).

Materials And Methods: Over a 3-year period, 123 patients with MD underwent 3-Tesla (3 T) temporal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), including 3D-FLAIR and CE-FLAIR sequences. The SI of membranous labyrinth of the cochlea in both ears of each patient was measured by drawing a region of interest (ROI) with a seed growing technique. The correlation between measured cochlear SIs on 3D-FLAIR and CE-FLAIR images, contrast enhancement index (CEI), and contrast enhancement ratio (CER) and clinical findings and pre- and post-treatment PTA results were assessed.

Results: Cochlear signal ratios of symptomatic ears on 3D-FLAIR and CE-FLAIR images were significantly higher than those of asymptomatic ears (P < 0.001). The area under the curve, from the receiver operating characteristic curve of cochlear SIs on 3D-FLAIR and CE-FLAIR images for discrimination between symptomatic and asymptomatic ears, was 0.729 and 0.728, respectively. Cochlear SIs on 3D-FLAIR and CE-FLAIR images were significantly correlated with patients' sex (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively), symptomatic ear (both P < 0.0001), and pre-treatment PTA (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.005, respectively), but were not significantly correlated with patients' age, post-treatment PTA or hearing threshold level at 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, or 4.0 kHz.

Conclusion: Quantitative analysis of cochlear SI on 3D-FLAIR and CE-FLAIR images may be a helpful diagnostic adjunct for MD, but may be of little value in predicting the prognosis of MD.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neurad.2019.03.010DOI Listing
September 2019

High-pitch, 120 kVp/30 mAs, low-dose dual-source chest CT with iterative reconstruction: Prospective evaluation of radiation dose reduction and image quality compared with those of standard-pitch low-dose chest CT in healthy adult volunteers.

PLoS One 2019 24;14(1):e0211097. Epub 2019 Jan 24.

Department of Radiology, Hallym University Medical Center, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang-si, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea.

Purpose: Objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the iterative reconstruction of high-pitch dual-source chest CT (IR-HP-CT) scanned with low radiation exposure compared with low dose chest CT (LDCT).

Materials And Methods: This study was approved by the institutional review board. Thirty healthy adult volunteers (mean age 44 years) were enrolled in this study. All volunteers underwent both IR-HP-CT and LDCT. IR-HP-CT was scanned with 120 kVp tube voltage, 30 mAs tube current and pitch 3.2 and reconstructed with sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction. LDCT was scanned with 120 kVp tube voltage, 40 mAs tube current and pitch 0.8 and reconstructed with B50 filtered back projection. Image noise, and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the infraspinatus muscle, subcutaneous fat and lung parenchyma were calculated. Cardiac motion artifact, overall image quality and artifacts was rated by two blinded readers using 4-point scale. The dose-length product (DLP) (mGy∙cm) were obtained from each CT dosimetry table. Scan length was calculated from the DLP results. The DLP parameter was a metric of radiation output, not of patient dose. Size-specific dose estimation (SSDE, mGy) was calculated using the sum of the anteroposterior and lateral dimensions and effective radiation dose (ED, mSv) were calculated using CT dosimetry index.

Results: Approximately, mean 40% of SSDE (2.1 ± 0.2 mGy vs. 3.5 ± 0.3 mGy) and 34% of ED (1.0 ± 0.1 mSv vs. 1.5 ± 0.1 mSv) was reduced in IR-HP-CT compared to LDCT (P < 0.0001). Image noise was reduced in the IR-HP-CT (16.8 ± 2.8 vs. 19.8 ± 3.4, P = 0.0001). SNR of lung and aorta of IR-HP-CT showed better results compared with that of LDCT (22.2 ± 5.9 vs. 33.0 ± 7.8, 1.9 ± 0.4 vs 1.1 ± 0.3, P < 0.0001). The score of cardiac pulsation artifacts were significantly reduced on IR-HP-CT (3.8 ± 0.4, 95% confidence interval, 3.7‒4.0) compared with LDCT (1.6 ± 0.6, 95% confidence interval, 1.3‒1.8) (P < 0.0001). SNR of muscle and fat, beam hardening artifact and overall subjective image quality of the mediastinum, lung and chest wall were comparable on both scans (P ≥ 0.05).

Conclusion: IR-HP-CT with 120 kVp and 30 mAs tube setting in addition to an iterative reconstruction reduced cardiac motion artifact and radiation exposure while representing similar image quality compared with LDCT.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0211097PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6345490PMC
October 2019

Comparison of the diagnostic performance of CT Hounsfield unit histogram analysis and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in predicting osteoporosis of the femur.

Eur Radiol 2019 Apr 25;29(4):1831-1840. Epub 2018 Sep 25.

Department of Radiology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, 22, Gwanpyeong-ro 170beon-gil, Dongan-gu, Anyang-si, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea, 14068.

Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic performance of Hounsfield unit histogram analysis (HUHA) of precontrast abdominal-pelvic CT scans for predicting osteoporosis.

Materials And Methods: The study included 271 patients who had undergone dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and abdominal-pelvic CT within 1 month. HUHA was measured using commercial 3D analysis software (Aquarius iNtuition v4.4.12, TeraRecon) and expressed as a percentage of seven HU range categories related to the ROI: A < 0, 0 ≤ B < 25, 25 ≤ C < 50, 50 ≤ D < 75, 75 ≤ E < 100, 100 ≤ F < 130, and 130 ≤ G. A coronal reformatted precontrast CT image containing the largest Ward's triangle was selected and then the ROI was drawn over the femoral neck. Correlation (r) and ROC curve analyses were used to assess diagnostic performance in predicting osteoporosis using the femur T-score as the reference standard.

Results: When the femur T-score was used as the reference, the rs of HUHA-A and HUHA-G were 0.74 and -0.57, respectively. Other HUHA values had moderate to weak correlations (r = -0.33 to 0.27). The correlation of HUHA-A was significantly higher than that of HUHA-G (p = 0.03). The area under the curve (0.95) of HUHA-A differed significantly from that of HUHA-G (0.90; p < 0.01). A HUHA-A threshold ≥ 27.7% was shown to predict osteoporosis based on a sensitivity and specificity of 95.6% and 81.7%, respectively.

Conclusion: The HUHA-A value of the femoral neck is closely related to osteoporosis and may help predict osteoporosis.

Key Points: • HUHA correlated strongly with the DXA femur T-score (HUHA-A, r = 0.74). • The diagnostic performance of HUHA for predicting osteoporosis (AUC = 0.95) was better than that of the average CT HU value (AUC = 0.91; p < 0.05). • HUHA may help predict osteoporosis and enable semi-quantitative measurement of changes in bone mineral density.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00330-018-5728-0DOI Listing
April 2019

Validation of body composition using bioelectrical impedance analysis in children according to the degree of obesity.

Scand J Med Sci Sports 2018 Oct 10;28(10):2207-2215. Epub 2018 Jul 10.

Department of Family Medicine, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang, Korea.

This study aimed to validate body composition analysis using bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) against dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in children with obesity and to compare agreement between BIA and DXA according to their degree of obesity. Three hundred and sixteen children aged 6-17 years participated in the Intervention for Childhood and Adolescents Obesity via Activity and Nutrition study. We divided participants by body mass index (BMI) percentile (group 1: mild to moderate obesity; group 2: severe obesity) and compared body composition variables, eg, percentage of body fat (%BF), fat mass (FM), and fat-free mass (FFM) using BIA and DXA. The %BF and FM of BIA were significantly lower (-1.8% and -0.8 kg, respectively), and the FFM of BIA was significantly higher (1.4 kg) than those of DXA. There were significant negative relationships between the absolute value of differences from BIA and DXA and BMI z-scores in %BF, FM, and FFM (regression coefficient [β]: -1.39, 95% confidence interval [CI]: -1.81 to -0.97; β: -0.34, 95%CI: -0.61 to -0.06; β: -0.73, 95%CI: -1.03 to -0.44, respectively). The gap of body compositions between BIA and DXA decreased as participants became more obese, and the differences of FM in boys with severe obesity and the differences of %BF and FFM in girls with severe obesity were much less than those in children with mild to moderate obesity. In conclusion, the agreement between DXA and BIA was better for children with severe obesity than for children with mild to moderate obesity.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/sms.13248DOI Listing
October 2018

Motion effects on the measurement of stiffness on ultrasound shear wave elastography: a moving liver fibrosis phantom study.

Med Ultrason 2018 Feb;1(1):14-20

Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Children's Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Aims: To evaluate the differences between shear wave velocities (SWVs) measured with ultrasound elastography during the continuous motion using liver fibrosis phantoms.

Materials And Methods: Elasticities were measured with convex and linear transducers of supersonic shear wave imaging (SSI) and acoustic radiation force impulse imaging (ARFI) using liver elasticity phantoms (3.0 and 16.9 kPa) at depths of 2, 3, 4, and 5 cm. Motion velocities were 30 and 60 rpm with the phantoms in an upright position on the Orbital shaker. To simulate different directional motion, the phantoms were laid on their side on the shaker. The values between moving and static status were compared, and the number of measurement failure was counted. Results: In SSI, the convex transducer was less affected by motion at 30 rpm with the 3 kPa phantom. In the higher velocity motion and in the higher stiffness phantom, most values from SSI were different comparing with static status, and there was a tendency for elasticity values to increase during movement. In ARFI, there were frequent measurement failures without stable results during the motion.

Conclusions: Motion affected the measurement of elasticity differently in SSI and ARFI, according to the velocity, direction of the motion, and phantom stiffness. The convex transducer of SSI was less affected by motion in lower velocity motion and when using normal liver stiffness phantom.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.11152/mu-1138DOI Listing
February 2018

Acute pancreatitis in hand, foot and mouth disease caused by Coxsackievirus A16: case report.

Korean J Pediatr 2017 Oct 20;60(10):333-336. Epub 2017 Oct 20.

Department of Pediatrics, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang, Korea.

Coxsackievirus A16 (CA16), which primarily causes hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD), is associated with complications, such as encephalitis, acute flaccid paralysis, myocarditis, pericarditis, and shock. However, no case of pancreatitis associated with CA16 has been reported in children. We report a case of CA16-associated acute pancreatitis in a 3-year-old girl with HFMD. She was admitted because of poor oral intake and high fever for 1 day. Maculopapular rashes on both hands and feet and multiple vesicles on the soft palate were observed on physical examination. She was treated conservatively with intravenous fluids. On the fourth hospital day, she had severe abdominal pain and vomiting. The serum levels of amylase and lipase were remarkably elevated (amylase, 1,902 IU/L; reference range, 28-100 IU/L; lipase, >1,500 IU/L; reference range, 13-60 IU/L), and ultrasonography showed diffuse swelling of the pancreas with a small amount of ascites. The real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction result from a stool sample was positive for CA16. CA16 can cause acute pancreatitis, and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain in children with HFMD.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3345/kjp.2017.60.10.333DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5687981PMC
October 2017

Ultrasound features of secondary appendicitis in pediatric patients.

Ultrasonography 2018 Jul 25;37(3):233-243. Epub 2017 Aug 25.

Department of Radiology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang, Korea.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ultrasonographic findings of secondary appendicitis (SA) and to discuss the differential findings compared with primary appendicitis.

Methods: In this study, we analyzed the ultrasonographic findings of 94 patients under 15 years old of age treated at our institution from May 2005 to May 2014 who had bowel inflammation and an inflamed appendix with a maximal outer diameter >6 mm that improved with nonsurgical treatment (the SA group). Ninety-nine patients with pathologically proven acute appendicitis (the primary appendicitis [PA] group) from June 2013 to May 2014 and 44 patients with pathologically negative appendectomy results from May 2005 to May 2014 were also included to compare the ultrasonographic features of these conditions. A retrospective review of the ultrasonographic findings was performed by two radiologists. The clinical and laboratory findings were also reviewed. The results were statically analyzed using analysis of variance, the Pearson chi-square test, and the two-tailed Fisher exact test.

Results: Compared with PA, cases of SA had a smaller diameter (9.8 mm vs. 6.6 mm, P<0.001), and were less likely to show periappendiceal fat inflammation (98% vs. 6%, P<0.001) or an appendicolith (34% vs. 11%, P<0.001). SA showed mural hyperemia on color Doppler ultrasonography as frequently as PA (P=0.887).

Conclusion: The ultrasonographic features of SA included an increased diameter compared to a healthy appendix and the same level of hyperemia as in PA. However, the diameter was commonly in the equivocal range (mean diameter, 6.6 mm), and periappendiceal fat inflammation was rarely present in SA.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.14366/usg.17029DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6044217PMC
July 2018

The most-cited articles in pediatric imaging: a bibliometric analysis.

Minerva Pediatr 2019 10 27;71(5):461-469. Epub 2017 Jul 27.

Department of Radiology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea.

Introduction: The number of citations that an article has received reflects its impact on the scientific community. The purpose of our study was to identify and characterize the 51 most-cited articles in pediatric imaging.

Evidence Acquisition: Based on the database of Journal Citation Reports, we selected 350 journals that were considered as potential outlets for pediatric imaging articles. The Web of Science search tools were used to identify the most-cited articles relevant to pediatric imaging within the selected journals.

Evidence Synthesis: The 51 most-cited articles in pediatric imaging were published between 1952 and 2011, with 1980-1989 and 2000-2009 producing 15 articles, each. The number of citations ranged from 576-124 and the number of annual citations ranged from 49.05-2.56. The majority of articles were published in pediatric and related journals (N.=26), originated in the USA (N.=23), were original articles (N.=45), used MRI as imaging modality (N.=27), and were concerned with the subspecialty of brain (N.=34). University College London School of Medicine (N.=6) and School of Medicine University of California (N.=4) were the leading institutions and Reynolds EO (N.=7) was the most voluminous author.

Conclusions: Our study presents a detailed list and an analysis of the most-cited articles in the field of pediatric imaging, which provides an insight into historical developments and allows for recognition of the important advances in this field.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.23736/S0026-4946.17.05045-9DOI Listing
October 2019

A Case of Spontaneous Isolated Dissection of Left Gastric Artery.

J Korean Med Sci 2016 Sep;31(9):1349-50

Department of Radiology, Hallym University Medical Center, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang, Korea.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3346/jkms.2016.31.9.1349DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4974173PMC
September 2016

The 100 most-cited articles in neuroimaging: A bibliometric analysis.

Neuroimage 2016 Oct 18;139:149-156. Epub 2016 Jun 18.

Department of Neurology, Kangdong Seong-Sim Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

The purpose of our study was to identify and characterize the 100 most-cited articles in neuroimaging. Based on the database of Journal Citation Reports, we selected 669 journals that were considered as potential outlets for neuroimaging articles. The Web of Science search tools were used to identify the 100 most-cited articles relevant to neuroimaging within the selected journals. The following information was recorded for each article: publication year, journal, category and impact factor of journal, number of citations, number of annual citations, authorship, department, institution, country, article type, imaging technique used, and topic. The 100 most-cited articles in neuroimaging were published between 1980 and 2012, with 1995-2004 producing 69 articles. Citations ranged from 4384 to 673 and annual citations ranged from 313.1 to 24.9. The majority of articles were published in radiology/imaging journals (n=75), originated in the United States (n=58), were original articles (n=63), used MRI as imaging modality (n=85), and dealt with imaging technique (n=45). The Oxford Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain at John Radcliffe Hospital (n=10) was the leading institutions and Karl J. Friston (n=11) was the most prolific author. Our study presents a detailed list and an analysis of the 100 most-cited articles in the field of neuroimaging, which provides an insight into historical developments and allows for recognition of the important advances in this field.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2016.06.029DOI Listing
October 2016

Citation classics in neurointerventional research: a bibliometric analysis of the 100 most cited articles.

J Neurointerv Surg 2017 May 28;9(5):508-511. Epub 2016 Apr 28.

Department of Radiology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea.

Background And Purpose: The number of citations that an article has received can be used to evaluate its impact on the scientific community. This study aimed to identify the 100 most cited articles in the field of neurointervention and to analyze their characteristics.

Materials And Methods: We selected the 669 journals that were considered potentially to publish neurointervention articles based on the database of Journal Citation Reports. Using the Web of Science citation search tool, we identified the 100 most cited articles relevant to neurointervention within the selected journals. Each article was evaluated for several characteristics including publication year, journal, journal category, impact factor, number of citations, number of citations per year, authorship, department, institution, country, type of article, and topic.

Results: The number of citations for the top 100 articles ranged from 1912 to 170 (mean 363.4) and citations per year ranged from 271.0 to 4.1 (mean 40.0). The majority of articles were published in clinical neurology journals (63%), were published in 2000-2009 (39%), originated in the USA (45%), were original articles (95%), and dealt with endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysm (42%). The Department of Radiology, University of California School of Medicine (n=12) was the leading institution and Viñuela F (n=11) was the most prolific author.

Conclusions: Our study presents a detailed list and analysis of the 100 most cited articles in the field of neurointervention and provides a historical perspective on the scientific progress in this field.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/neurintsurg-2016-012399DOI Listing
May 2017

Replaced common hepatic artery from the superior mesenteric artery: multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) classification focused on pancreatic penetration and the course of travel.

Surg Radiol Anat 2016 Aug 12;38(6):655-62. Epub 2016 Jan 12.

Department of Surgery, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang, Republic of Korea.

Purpose: We categorize the subtypes of the replaced common hepatic artery (RCHA) and evaluate the clinical implications.

Methods: Thirty-four cases of the RCHA were evaluated retrospectively using multidetector computed tomography. We categorized them into the three RCHA subtypes according to pancreatic penetration and the passing routes. The distance between the orifice of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and RCHA bifurcation (D SMA-RCHA) was measured using advanced 3D imaging software. Analysis of variance was used to evaluate the difference in D SMA-RCHA according to the RCHA subtype.

Results: Type A (n = 17, 50 %) referred to RCHA penetrating the pancreatic parenchyma, all crossing the dorsal aspect of the superior mesenteric vein (SMV). Among them, three cases were accompanied by the circumportal pancreas. Type B (n = 10, 29 %) referred to RCHA without penetration of the pancreatic parenchyma and crossing of the dorsal aspect of the main portal vein (MPV) or SMV. Type C (n = 7, 21 %) referred to RCHA without penetration of the pancreas parenchyma and crossing of the ventral aspect of the MPV or SMV. The mean D SMA-RCHA of each subtype was as follows: type A, 3.13 cm [95 % confidence interval (CI) 2.70-3.57]; type B, 2.04 cm [95 % CI 1.40-2.68]; and type C, 2.14 cm [95 % CI 2.23-2.92]. The D SMA-RCHA of the penetrating pancreatic parenchyma of the RCHA was significantly longer than that of the non-penetrating pancreatic parenchyma (P = 0.007).

Conclusion: Half of RCHA show penetrating the pancreatic parenchyma, which was categorized as type A, and this type A takes off from the SMA more distally than RCHA without intrapancreatic penetration.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00276-016-1618-9DOI Listing
August 2016

Intramural esophageal dissection diagnosed on transabdominal ultrasonography.

Jpn J Radiol 2015 Dec 22;33(12):764-8. Epub 2015 Oct 22.

Department of Radiology, Hallym University Medical Center, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, 896, Pyeongchon-dong, Dongan-gu, Anyang-si, Gyeonggi-do, 431-070, Republic of Korea.

Intramural esophageal dissection (IED) is an uncommon yet important clinical entity characterized by a rupture or fissure in the esophageal submucosal layer. IED could occur spontaneously or secondary to direct extrinsic injury to the esophageal mucosa. Traditionally, IED has been diagnosed on the swallowing study using water-soluble contrast agents or barium. For alternative diagnostic modalities, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and chest computed tomography have been frequently performed. However, to the best of our knowledge, the transabdominal ultrasonography (USG) appearance of IED has not been reported in the literature yet. We report an interesting case of IED, which was initially diagnosed on the transabdominal USG.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11604-015-0488-0DOI Listing
December 2015

Prepubertal unilateral gynecomastia in the absence of endocrine abnormalities.

Ann Pediatr Endocrinol Metab 2014 Sep 30;19(3):159-63. Epub 2014 Sep 30.

Department of Pediatrics, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang, Korea.

Gynecomastia is defined as the excessive development of breast tissue in males, which can occur as unilateral or bilateral. Although the overall prevalence of gynecomastia is 40%-65%, the prepubertal unilateral gynecomastia in the absence of endocrine abnormalities is unusual, with only a few case reports in literature. Idiopathic gynecomastia in prepuberty is benign but a diagnosis of exclusion. We here report two cases of healthy prepubertal boys aged 8.8 and 9.6 years old, respectively, presented with painful palpable mass in their unilateral breast. Breast tissue with glandular proliferation was confirmed on ultrasonography. Serum levels of estradiol, testosterone, and other laboratory findings were within normal range. They seem to have the prepubertal idiopathic gynecomastia but further follow-up to see their progression is needed.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.6065/apem.2014.19.3.159DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4208259PMC
September 2014

Risk factors for recurrence of right colonic uncomplicated diverticulitis after first attack.

Int J Colorectal Dis 2014 Oct 1;29(10):1217-22. Epub 2014 Jul 1.

Department of Surgery, Hallym University College of Medicine, 896 Pyeongchon-dong, Dongan-gu, Anyang, 431-070, Republic of Korea.

Purpose: Most patients with acute right colonic uncomplicated diverticulitis can be managed conservatively. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical and radiologic risk factors for recurrence in patients with right colonic uncomplicated diverticulitis.

Methods: The present survey included 469 patients who were successfully managed conservatively for the first episode of right colonic uncomplicated diverticulitis between 2002 and 2012 in a referral center, and records were reviewed from collected data. Patients were divided into two groups: a nonrecurrent and a recurrent group. The clinical and radiologic features of all patients were analyzed to identify possible risk factors for recurrence. The Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression were used.

Results: Seventy-four (15.8 %) patients had recurrence, and 15 (3.2 %) received surgery at recurrence within a median follow-up of 59 months. The mean recurrence interval after the first attack was 29 months. In univariate and multivariate analyses, risk factors for recurrence were confirmed multiple diverticula (relative risk [RR], 2.62; 95 % confidence interval [CI], 1.56-4.40) and intraperitoneally located diverticulitis (RR, 3.73; 95 % CI, 2.13-6.52). Of 66 patients with two risk factors, 36 (54.5 %) had recurrence and 10 (15.2 %) received surgery at recurrence.

Conclusions: In patients with right colonic uncomplicated diverticulitis who have multiple diverticula and intraperitoneally located diverticulitis, the possibility of recurrence and surgical rate are high. Poor outcome may be cautioned in these patients.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00384-014-1941-8DOI Listing
October 2014

The role of US in finding intussusception and alternative diagnosis: a report of 100 pediatric cases.

Acta Radiol 2015 Feb 13;56(2):228-33. Epub 2014 Feb 13.

Department of Radiology, Kangwon National University College of Medicine, Kangwon-do, Republic of Korea.

Background: The clinical diagnosis of intussusception remains challenging, because many children with intussusception may present with non-specific signs and symptoms, which overlap with other conditions. Therefore imaging, in particular ultrasonography (US), plays a significant role in the management of these patients.

Purpose: To evaluate how US can contribute to the diagnosis in clinically suspected intussusception and finding alternative diagnosis.

Material And Methods: We retrospectively reviewed reports of US examinations and medical records of 100 patients (51 boys, 49 girls; mean age, 23.0 ± 12.1 months) who underwent abdominal US for clinically suspected intussusception. Each US study was assessed for the presence or absence of intussusception and for a possible alternative diagnosis in cases interpreted as negative for intussusception.

Results: Thirty-seven patients had US findings consistent with intussusception, which was confirmed by air enema. In seven patients, US studies were normal. Alternative diagnoses were identified by US for each of the remaining 56 patients, including ileocolitis (n = 20), terminal ileitis (n = 18), mesenteric lymphadenitis (n = 13), choledochal cyst (n = 1), accessory spleen torsion (n = 1), small bowel ileus (n = 1), midgut volvulus with bowel ischemia (n = 1), and hydronephrosis (n = 1).

Conclusion: With the high sensitivity and specificity of this study we conclude that US is valuable in detecting intussusception and finding the alternative diagnosis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0284185114524088DOI Listing
February 2015

CT findings in apical versus basal involvement of pulmonary tuberculosis.

Diagn Interv Radiol 2013 Mar-Apr;19(2):85-90

Department of Radiology, Hallym University College of Medicine, Chuncheon, Republic of Korea.

Purpose: We aimed to compare clinical features and computed tomography (CT) findings of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) in lower lobe basal segments and upper lobe apical or apicoposterior segments.

Materials And Methods: We retrospectively reviewed medical records and chest CT scans of 986 adults who were diagnosed with active pulmonary TB. Active pulmonary TB confined to the basal segments was found in 21 patients. Sixty patients had disease localized to the apical or apicoposterior segments only. Clinical features and CT abnormalities of the lung parenchyma, airways, mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes, and pleura were compared between these two groups.

Results: A significant difference was observed between two groups in terms of underlying disease prevalence associated with an immunocompromised state (basal, 6/21, 28.6%; apical or apico- posterior, 3/60, 5%; P = 0.008). Chest CT findings, including consolidation (P = 0.0016), lymphadenopathy (P = 0.0297), and pleural effusion (P = 0.008), were more common in basal segment TB than in apical or apicoposterior segment TB. Small nodules were less common in basal segment TB than in apical or apicoposterior segment TB (P = 0.0299). The tree-in-bud sign was the most common CT finding in both basal segment TB (17/21, 81%) and apical or apicoposterior segment TB groups (53/60, 88.3%) (P = 0.4633).

Conclusion: Lower lobe basal segment TB was more commonly present with common CT findings of primary pulmonary TB including consolidation, mediastinal and hilar lymphadenopathy, and pleural effusion than apical or apicoposterior segment TB.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4261/1305-3825.DIR.6025-12.3DOI Listing
January 2014

Percutaneous core needle biopsy for small (≤ 10 mm) lung nodules: accurate diagnosis and complication rates.

Diagn Interv Radiol 2012 Nov-Dec;18(6):527-30. Epub 2012 Jun 5.

Department of Radiology, Hallym University College of Medicine, Chuncheon, Republic of Korea.

Purpose: To evaluate accurate diagnosis and complication rates of percutaneous core needle biopsy (PCNB) with an automated gun for small lung nodules that are 10 mm or less in diameter.

Materials And Methods: Forty-two cases of small lung nodules with diameters ≤ 10 mm (mean diameter, 9 mm) that received a PCNB were included in this study. Imaging guidance was fluoroscopy in 30 cases and computed tomography (CT) in 12 cases.

Results: Accurate diagnosis was achieved with the initial PCNB in 88.1% (37/42) of cases. Accurate diagnosis rates were 86.7% (26/30) with fluoroscopic guidance and 91.7% (11/12) with CT guidance (P > 0.05). The complication rate of PCNB was 7.1% (3/42), including hemoptysis (n=2) and pneumothorax (n=1). The complication rate was 6.7% (2/30) with fluoroscopic guidance and 8.3% (1/12) with CT guidance (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION PCNB: with an automated gun is useful for the pathologically conclusive diagnosis of small lung nodules (≤ 10 mm in diameter) using fluoroscopic or CT guidance.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4261/1305-3825.DIR.5617-12.2DOI Listing
November 2013

High-resolution computed tomography findings of swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus (S-OIV) infection: comparison with scrub typhus.

Acta Radiol 2012 Jul 27;53(6):657-61. Epub 2012 May 27.

Department of Radiology, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Background: Swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus (S-OIV) infection and scrub typhus, also known as tsutsugamushi disease can manifest as acute respiratory illnesses, particularly during the late fall or early winter, with similar radiographic findings, such as a predominance of ground-glass opacity (GGO).

Purpose: To differentiate S-OIV infection from scrub typhus using high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT).

Material And Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the HRCT findings of 14 patients with S-OIV infection and 10 patients with scrub typhus. We assessed the location, cross-sectional distribution, and the presence of a peribronchovascular distribution of GGO and consolidations on HRCT. We also assessed the presence of interlobular septal thickening, bronchial wall thickening, pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum, pleural effusion, and mediastinal or axillary lymph node enlargement.

Results: Scrub typhus was more common than S-OIV in elderly patients (P < 0.001). The monthly incidences of S-OIV and scrub typhus infection reached a peak between October and November. About 86% of S-OIV patients and 80% of scrub typhus patients presented with GGO. About 67% of the GGO lesions in S-OIV had a peribronchovascular distribution, but this was absent in scrub typhus (P = 0.005). Consolidation (93% vs. 10%, P < 0.001) and bronchial wall thickening (43% vs. 0%, P = 0.024) were more frequent in S-OIV infection than scrub typhus. Interlobular septal thickening (90% vs. 36%, P = 0.013) and axillary lymphadenopathy (90% vs. 0%, P < 0.001) were more common in scrub typhus than S-OIV infection.

Conclusion: There was considerable overlap in HRCT findings between S-OIV infection and scrub typhus. However, S-OIV showed a distinctive peribronchovascular distribution of GGO lesions. Consolidation and bronchial wall thickening were seen more frequently in S-OIV infection, whereas interlobular septal thickening and axillary lymphadenopathy were more common in scrub typhus. Thus, CT could be helpful for differential diagnosis between S-OIV infection and scrub typhus.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1258/ar.2012.120012DOI Listing
July 2012

Cavo-caval intervention stent insertion after deceased-donor liver transplantation using side-to-side piggyback technique: report of a case.

Korean J Hepatobiliary Pancreat Surg 2011 Aug 31;15(3):184-8. Epub 2011 Aug 31.

Department of Radiology, Hallym University Medical Center, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang, Korea.

Liver transplantation with preservation of the recipient vena cava (piggyback technique) has been performed as an alternative to the conventional method. Outflow disturbance or obstruction of the vena cava in the early period after liver transplantation is associated with high morbidity and mortality. We used side-to-side cavo-caval anastomosis (modified piggyback technique) in a deceased-donor liver transplantation (DDLT) for venous outflow reconstruction. On postoperative day 9, the patient developed abdominal discomfort, and abnormal liver function showing serum total bilirubin of 6.2 mg/dl and serum AST/ALT of 297/597 IU/L. Doppler ultrasound showed mono-phasic wave forms of the hepatic vein. Computed tomography showed focal narrowing of 9.5 mm×12 mm in diameter at the cavo-caval anastomosis site. Liver biopsy was showed that there was no evidence of acute allograft rejection. Direct venogram showed stenosis of the cavo-caval anastomosis with a pressure gradient of 12 mmHg. An interventional stent was inserted in the stenotic site of the inferior vena cava, and the pressure gradient decreased to 2 mmHg. He was discharged from hospital on postoperative day 23 without any other complications. Herein we report a case of deceased-donor liver transplantation using the modified piggyback technique, who received an inferior vena cava stent due to stricture of the reconstructed orifice of the vena cava.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.14701/kjhbps.2011.15.3.184DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4582544PMC
August 2011

Percutaneous needle aspiration biopsy (PCNAB) of lung lesions: 5 years results with focusing on repeat PCNAB.

Eur J Radiol 2010 Mar 5;73(3):551-4. Epub 2009 Feb 5.

Department of Radiology, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Purpose: To evaluate 5 years results of percutaneous needle aspiration biopsy (PCNAB) for lung lesions and usefulness of the reaspiration or rebiopsy of lung lesions (repeat PCNAB).

Materials And Methods: Six hundred and fifteen cases of PCNAB (591 initial PCNAB and 24 repeat PCNAB) performed under the CT or fluoroscopy guidance in 591 patients was enrolled. The procedure was done using an automated biopsy gun with a 20-G needle (519 cases) or a 20-G aspiration needle (96 cases). The pathologic results, type and rate of complications in the initial and repeat PCNAB were evaluated. The pathologic agreement rate between the initial and repeat PCNAB, and reasons of the repeat PCNAB were also evaluated.

Results: Of the 615 PCNAB cases, 345 cases yielded tumors and 270 cases yielded non-tumorous lesions. Of the tumorous lesions, 307 cases were primary lung malignancies, 34 cases were metastases, and 4 were benign tumors. The repeat PCNAB rate was 4.1% (24/591). There was no statistically significant difference between automated gun biopsy and needle aspiration as a biopsy tool for calling repeat PCNAB (p=0.4034). The causes for a repeat PCNAB were inconclusive (n=14) and unexpected pathologic results (n=10). Of the 14 pathologically inconclusive cases on initial PCNAB, 9 cases revealed malignancy after the repeat PCNAB. Of the 10 cases with unexpected pathologic results on initial PCNAB, 3 cases yielded different pathologic results on repeat PCNAB from initial PCNAB. The cumulative complication rate of PCNAB was 11.4% (70/615).

Conclusion: PCNAB was useful for the diagnosis of pulmonary lesions. Repeat PCNAB might be helpful for the exact diagnosis of lung lesions where initial PCNAB yields inconclusive or unexpected pathologic results.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejrad.2009.01.009DOI Listing
March 2010

What is the complementary role of ultrasound evaluation in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis after CT?

Eur J Radiol 2010 Apr 13;74(1):71-6. Epub 2009 Jan 13.

Department of Radiology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang, Republic of Korea.

The objective of our study was to estimate the complementary role of ultrasound evaluation in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis after abdominoplevic CT. A total of 104 patients initially underwent abdominopelvic CT before appendix US due to acute abdominal pain. All CT examinations were evaluated retrospectively for the presence of acute appendicitis. The findings of appendix on CT were classified into five categories (definite appendicitis, probably appendicitis, equivocal CT findings for diagnosis of appendicitis, probably not appendicitis, and normal looking appendix). Appendix US images and their radiologic reports were also evaluated retrospectively. Then, CT and US findings were correlated with clinical or pathologic diagnosis. Three all patients with definite appendicitis initially on CT again showed US findings of appendicitis. In the 32 patients of probably appendicitis on CT, US showed normal looking appendix in seven patients (21.8%, 7 of 32) who improved with medical treatment and discharged. In the 16 patients of equivocal CT findings for diagnosis of appendicitis, US showed appendicitis in seven patients (43.8%, 7 of 16) and normal looking appendix in nine patients. In the 12 patients of probably not appendicitis on CT, US showed acute appendicitis in two patients (16.7%, 2 of 12). In the 41 patients of normal looking appendix on CT, US showed acute appendicitis in five patients (12.2%, 5 of 41). US reevaluation enables us to avoid misdiagnosis of appendicitis on CT and improve diagnostic accuracy of acute appendicitis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejrad.2008.11.017DOI Listing
April 2010