Publications by authors named "Kurt Lindbeck"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Genome-wide Association Study Identifies New Loci for Resistance to in Canola.

Front Plant Sci 2016 24;7:1513. Epub 2016 Oct 24.

Marcroft Grains Pathology, Horsham VIC, Australia.

Key message "We identified both quantitative and quantitative resistance loci to , a fungal pathogen, causing blackleg disease in canola. Several genome-wide significant associations were detected at known and new loci for blackleg resistance. We further validated statistically significant associations in four genetic mapping populations, demonstrating that GWAS marker loci are indeed associated with resistance to One of the novel loci identified for the first time, , conveys adult plant resistance in canola." Blackleg, caused by , is a significant disease which affects the sustainable production of canola (). This study reports a genome-wide association study based on 18,804 polymorphic SNPs to identify loci associated with qualitative and quantitative resistance to . Genomic regions delimited with 694 significant SNP markers, that are associated with resistance evaluated using 12 single spore isolates and pathotypes from four canola stubble were identified. Several significant associations were detected at known disease resistance loci including in the vicinity of recently cloned / genes, and at new loci on chromosomes A01/C01, A02/C02, A03/C03, A05/C05, A06, A08, and A09. In addition, we validated statistically significant associations on A01, A07, and A10 in four genetic mapping populations, demonstrating that GWAS marker loci are indeed associated with resistance to . One of the novel loci identified for the first time, , conveys adult plant resistance and mapped within 13.2 kb from gene of TIR-NBS class. We showed that resistance loci are located in the vicinity of genes of and on the sequenced genome of cv. Darmor-. Significantly associated SNP markers provide a valuable tool to enrich germplasm for favorable alleles in order to improve the level of resistance to in canola.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpls.2016.01513DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5075532PMC
October 2016

Molecular mapping of qualitative and quantitative loci for resistance to Leptosphaeria maculans causing blackleg disease in canola (Brassica napus L.).

Theor Appl Genet 2012 Jul 28;125(2):405-18. Epub 2012 Mar 28.

EH Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation, NSW Department of Primary Industries and Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga Agricultural Institute, PMB, Wagga Wagga, NSW 2650, Australia.

Blackleg, caused by Leptosphaeria maculans, is one of the most important diseases of oilseed and vegetable crucifiers worldwide. The present study describes (1) the construction of a genetic linkage map, comprising 255 markers, based upon simple sequence repeats (SSR), sequence-related amplified polymorphism, sequence tagged sites, and EST-SSRs and (2) the localization of qualitative (race-specific) and quantitative (race non-specific) trait loci controlling blackleg resistance in a doubled-haploid population derived from the Australian canola (Brassica napus L.) cultivars Skipton and Ag-Spectrum using the whole-genome average interval mapping approach. Marker regression analyses revealed that at least 14 genomic regions with LOD ≥ 2.0 were associated with qualitative and quantitative blackleg resistance, explaining 4.6-88.9 % of genotypic variation. A major qualitative locus, designated RlmSkipton (Rlm4), was mapped on chromosome A7, within 0.8 cM of the SSR marker Xbrms075. Alignment of the molecular markers underlying this QTL region with the genome sequence data of B. rapa L. suggests that RlmSkipton is located approximately 80 kb from the Xbrms075 locus. Molecular marker-RlmSkipton linkage was further validated in an F(2) population from Skipton/Ag-Spectrum. Our results show that SSR markers linked to consistent genomic regions are suitable for enrichment of favourable alleles for blackleg resistance in canola breeding programs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00122-012-1842-6DOI Listing
July 2012
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