Publications by authors named "Kurt Laederach"

15 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Serum Metabolites Responding in a Dose-Dependent Manner to the Intake of a High-Fat Meal in Normal Weight Healthy Men Are Associated with Obesity.

Metabolites 2021 Jun 16;11(6). Epub 2021 Jun 16.

Food Microbial Systems Research Division, Agroscope, Schwarzenburgstrasse 161, 3003 Berne, Switzerland.

Although the composition of the human blood metabolome is influenced both by the health status of the organism and its dietary behavior, the interaction between these two factors has been poorly characterized. This study makes use of a previously published randomized controlled crossover acute intervention to investigate whether the blood metabolome of 15 healthy normal weight (NW) and 17 obese (OB) men having ingested three doses (500, 1000, 1500 kcal) of a high-fat (HF) meal can be used to identify metabolites differentiating these two groups. Among the 1024 features showing a postprandial response, measured between 0 h and 6 h, in the NW group, 135 were dose-dependent. Among these 135 features, 52 had fasting values that were significantly different between NW and OB men, and, strikingly, they were all significantly higher in OB men. A subset of the 52 features was identified as amino acids (e.g., branched-chain amino acids) and amino acid derivatives. As the fasting concentration of most of these metabolites has already been associated with metabolic dysfunction, we propose that challenging normal weight healthy subjects with increasing caloric doses of test meals might allow for the identification of new fasting markers associated with obesity.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/metabo11060392DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8233812PMC
June 2021

Mental Illness Has a Negative Impact on Weight Loss in Bariatric Patients: a 4-Year Follow-up.

J Gastrointest Surg 2019 02 8;23(2):232-238. Epub 2018 Aug 8.

Department of Visceral Surgery and Medicine, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital and University of Bern, 3010, Bern, Switzerland.

Background: Mental health disorders are highly prevalent among bariatric surgery patients. Bariatric surgery induces weight loss with continuous health improvements. However, long-term follow-up data on weight loss and quality of life data of patients who have a mental illness after bariatric surgery are scarce, and it is not clear whether mental illness is associated with more pronounced weight regain. The aim was to investigate the impact of preoperative mental illness on the course of long-term weight changes after bariatric surgery.

Methods: Patients with sleeve gastrectomy (SG) or Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) between 2005 and 2013 with a follow-up of at least 3 years were included. The study population was divided into two groups: patients with mental illness (MI) and patients without (No-MI). Weight loss outcomes over time were compared using mixed models up to 4 years after surgery.

Results: In total, 254 patients (RYGB 61.0%, SG 39%) were included. The distribution of baseline characteristics was similar between the MI (n = 108) and No-MI groups (n = 146). The most prevalent mental illness was depressive disorder (63.9%). In the MI group, the percent of total weight loss (%TWL) was significantly smaller over the study period. After 36 months, the predicted mean group-difference of %TWL was 4.6% (95% CI 1.9, 7.2; p = 0.001), and the predicted odds ratio for weight regain was 4.9 (95% CI 1.6, 15.1) for patients in the MI group.

Conclusion: Preoperative mental illness leads to lower long-term weight loss and an increased risk of weight regain after bariatric surgery.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11605-018-3903-xDOI Listing
February 2019

Erratum to: Evaluation of a multiprofessional, nonsurgical obesity treatment program: which parameters indicated life style changes and weight loss?

J Eat Disord 2017 27;5:48. Epub 2017 Oct 27.

Department of Diabetes, Endocrinology, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, University of Bern and University Hospital of Bern, 3010 Bern, Switzerland.

[This corrects the article DOI: 10.1186/s40337-017-0144-4.].
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40337-017-0167-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5660443PMC
October 2017

Evaluation of a multiprofessional, nonsurgical obesity treatment program: which parameters indicated life style changes and weight loss?

J Eat Disord 2017 15;5:14. Epub 2017 May 15.

Department of Diabetes, Endocrinology, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, University of Bern and University Hospital of Bern, 3010 Bern, Switzerland.

Background: According to the current evidence, behavior modifications are an effective part of a non-surgical multiprofessional obesity treatment program (MOTP). The purpose of the present study was to report changes in weight as well in psychological variables during a one year MOTP. We aimed to identify the associations of emotional state and patients' emotion regulation skills with weight change.

Methods: Prospective interventional study. Data of participants attending the one year obesity treatment in either a group or individual structured MOTP were analyzed. Weight, BMI (Body Mass Index) and measures on psychosomatic variables, emotion regulation skills, affective state, shame and guilt were collected at baseline, after three months and after one year. Mixed-effects models were used for the statistical analysis of BMI.

Results: We included 238 patients at baseline (t1), 234 after three months (t2) and 179 after one year (t3). A drop in BMI measurements of at least 5% was observed in 20.6% of participants at t2 and 41.4% of participants at t3. After three months, participants showed significant improvements in the following psychosomatic variables: somatisation ( < 0.001), interpersonal sensitivity ( < 0.001), emotion regulation skills ( < 0.01), and attention to emotions ( < 0.05). Most of the improvements could be maintained after one year. BMI reduction was associated with a positive change in emotions, improvements in emotion regulation skills, and a reduction of depressive symptoms, disgust and shame.

Conclusions: The results indicate that the assessment and treatment of psychological aspects like depression, emotion regulation skills, body awareness, and acceptance should be a vital part of an interdisciplinary MOPT.

Trial Registration: Ethical approval for the present study was obtained from the Bern Kantonal Ethics Committee (KEK-Bern-Study Nr 258/14), Bern, Switzerland.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40337-017-0144-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5430604PMC
May 2017

Caloric dose-responsive genes in blood cells differentiate the metabolic status of obese men.

J Nutr Biochem 2017 05 4;43:156-165. Epub 2017 Mar 4.

Agroscope, Federal Department of Economic Affairs, Education and Research EAER, CH-3003 Bern, Switzerland. Electronic address:

We have investigated the postprandial transcriptional response of blood cells to increasing caloric doses of a meal challenge to test whether the dynamic response of the human organism to the ingestion of food is dependent on metabolic health. The randomized crossover study included seven normal weight and seven obese men consuming three doses (500/1000/1500 kcal) of a high-fat meal. The blood cell transcriptome was measured before and 2, 4, and 6 h after meal ingestion (168 samples). We applied univariate and multivariate statistics to investigate differentially expressed genes in both study groups. We identified 624 probe sets that were up- or down-regulated after the caloric challenge in a dose-dependent manner. These transcripts were most responsive to the 1500 kcal challenge in the obese group and were associated with postprandial insulin and oxidative phosphorylation. Furthermore, the data revealed a separation of the obese group into individuals whose response was close to the normal weight group and individuals with a transcriptional response indicative of a loss of metabolic flexibility. The molecular signature provided by the postprandial transcriptomic response of blood cells to increasing caloric doses of a high-fat meal challenge may represent a sensitive way to evaluate the qualitative impact of food on human health.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jnutbio.2017.02.012DOI Listing
May 2017

Wernicke Encephalopathy: a Future Problem Even After Sleeve Gastrectomy? A Systematic Literature Review.

Obes Surg 2016 Jan;26(1):205-12

Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) is a serious complication of bariatric surgery with significant morbidity and mortality. A few cases have been reported in the literature, mainly in patients after a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Since sleeve gastrectomy (SG) has become a more established and popular bariatric procedure, WE is expected to appear more frequently after SG. We performed a literature review on WE after SG, and 13 cases have been found to be sufficiently documented. The risk of WE needs to be considered in patients with a prolonged vomiting episode and any type of neurological symptoms, independent of the presence of any surgical complications.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11695-015-1927-9DOI Listing
January 2016

Inflammatory and metabolic responses to high-fat meals with and without dairy products in men.

Br J Nutr 2015 Jun 20;113(12):1853-61. Epub 2015 May 20.

Agroscope, Institute for Food Sciences (IFS),Schwarzenburgstrasse 161,3003Bern,Switzerland.

Postprandial inflammation is an important factor for human health since chronic low-grade inflammation is associated with chronic diseases. Dairy products have a weak but significant anti-inflammatory effect on postprandial inflammation. The objective of the present study was to compare the effect of a high-fat dairy meal (HFD meal), a high-fat non-dairy meal supplemented with milk (HFM meal) and a high-fat non-dairy control meal (HFC meal) on postprandial inflammatory and metabolic responses in healthy men. A cross-over study was conducted in nineteen male subjects. Blood samples were collected before and 1, 2, 4 and 6 h after consumption of the test meals. Plasma concentrations of insulin, glucose, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, TAG and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured at each time point. IL-6, TNF-α and endotoxin concentrations were assessed at baseline and endpoint (6 h). Time-dependent curves of these metabolic parameters were plotted, and the net incremental AUC were found to be significantly higher for TAG and lower for CRP after consumption of the HFM meal compared with the HFD meal; however, the HFM and HFD meals were not different from the HFC meal. Alterations in IL-6, TNF-α and endotoxin concentrations were not significantly different between the test meals. The results suggest that full-fat milk and dairy products (cheese and butter) have no significant impact on the inflammatory response to a high-fat meal.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0007114515000677DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4498462PMC
June 2015

Adaption of cardio-respiratory balance during day-rest compared to deep sleep--an indicator for quality of life?

Psychiatry Res 2014 Nov 9;219(3):638-44. Epub 2014 Jun 9.

Department of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Clinical Nutrition, Autonomic Lab, University Hospital Inselspital, University of Berne, Murtenstrasse 21, CH-3010 Bern, Switzerland. Electronic address:

Heart rate and breathing rate fluctuations represent interacting physiological oscillations. These interactions are commonly studied using respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) of heart rate variability (HRV) or analyzing cardiorespiratory synchronization. Earlier work has focused on a third type of relationship, the temporal ratio of respiration rate and heart rate (HRR). Each method seems to reveal a specific aspect of cardiorespiratory interaction and may be suitable for assessing states of arousal and relaxation of the organism. We used HRR in a study with 87 healthy subjects to determine the ability to relax during 5 day-resting periods in comparison to deep sleep relaxation. The degree to which a person during waking state could relax was compared to somatic complaints, health-related quality of life, anxiety and depression. Our results show, that HRR is barely connected to balance (LF/HF) in HRV, but significantly correlates to the perception of general health and mental well-being as well as to depression. If relaxation, as expressed in HRR, during day-resting is near to deep sleep relaxation, the subjects felt healthier, indicated better mental well-being and less depressive moods.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2014.06.004DOI Listing
November 2014

A dose-response strategy reveals differences between normal-weight and obese men in their metabolic and inflammatory responses to a high-fat meal.

J Nutr 2014 Oct 8;144(10):1517-23. Epub 2014 May 8.

Institute of Food Science, Agroscope, Federal Office of Agriculture, Berne, Switzerland

A dose-response strategy may not only allow investigation of the impact of foods and nutrients on human health but may also reveal differences in the response of individuals to food ingestion based on their metabolic health status. In a randomized crossover study, we challenged 19 normal-weight (BMI: 20-25 kg/m(2)) and 18 obese (BMI: >30 kg/m(2)) men with 500, 1000, and 1500 kcal of a high-fat (HF) meal (60.5% energy from fat). Blood was taken at baseline and up to 6 h postprandially and analyzed for a range of metabolic, inflammatory, and hormonal variables, including plasma glucose, lipids, and C-reactive protein and serum insulin, glucagon-like peptide-1, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and endotoxin. Insulin was the only variable that could differentiate the postprandial response of normal-weight and obese participants at each of the 3 caloric doses. A significant response of the inflammatory marker IL-6 was only observed in the obese group after ingestion of the HF meal containing 1500 kcal [net incremental AUC (iAUC) = 22.9 ± 6.8 pg/mL × 6 h, P = 0.002]. Furthermore, the net iAUC for triglycerides significantly increased from the 1000 to the 1500 kcal meal in the obese group (5.0 ± 0.5 mmol/L × 6 h vs. 6.0 ± 0.5 mmol/L × 6 h; P = 0.015) but not in the normal-weight group (4.3 ± 0.5 mmol/L × 6 h vs. 4.8 ± 0.5 mmol/L × 6 h; P = 0.31). We propose that caloric dose-response studies may contribute to a better understanding of the metabolic impact of food on the human organism. This study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01446068.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3945/jn.114.193565DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4162475PMC
October 2014

Early results of the Swiss Multicentre Bypass or Sleeve Study (SM-BOSS): a prospective randomized trial comparing laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass.

Ann Surg 2013 Nov;258(5):690-4; discussion 695

*Departments of Surgery and Internal Medicine, Claraspital, Basel, Switzerland †Departments of Surgery and Internal Medicine, Inselspital, Bern, Switzerland ‡Department of Surgery, Kantonsspital St. Gallen, St. Gallen, Switzerland §Department of Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, University Hospital Zürich, Zurich, Switzerland.

Objective: Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) has been proposed as an effective alternative to the current standard procedure, laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB). Prospective data comparing both procedures are rare. Therefore, we performed a randomized clinical trial assessing the effectiveness and safety of these 2 operative techniques.

Methods: Two hundred seventeen patients were randomized at 4 bariatric centers in Switzerland. One hundred seven patients underwent LSG using a 35-F bougie with suturing of the stapler line, and 110 patients underwent LRYGB with a 150-cm antecolic alimentary and a 50-cm biliopancreatic limb. The mean body mass index of all patients was 44 ± 11.1 kg/m, the mean age was 43 ± 5.3 years, and 72% were female.

Results: The 2 groups were similar in terms of body mass index, age, sex, comorbidities, and eating behavior. The mean operative time was less for LSG than for LRYGB (87 ± 52.3 minutes vs 108 ± 42.3 minutes; P = 0.003). The conversion rate was 0.9% in both groups. Complications (<30 days) occurred more often in LRYGB than in LSG (17.2% vs 8.4%; P = 0.067). However, the difference in severe complications did not reach statistical significance (4.5% for LRYGB vs 1% for LSG; P = 0.21). Excessive body mass index loss 1 year after the operation was similar between the 2 groups (72.3% ± 22% for LSG and 76.6% ± 21% for LRYGB; P = 0.2). Except for gastroesophageal reflux disease, which showed a higher resolution rate after LRYGB, the comorbidities and quality of life were significantly improved after both procedures.

Conclusions: LSG was associated with shorter operation time and a trend toward fewer complications than with LRYGB. Both procedures were almost equally efficient regarding weight loss, improvement of comorbidities, and quality of life 1 year after surgery. Long-term follow-up data are needed to confirm these facts.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SLA.0b013e3182a67426DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3888472PMC
November 2013

[Extensive conservative treatment of obesity].

Ther Umsch 2013 Feb;70(2):93-101

Universitätspoliklinik für Endokrinologie, Diabetologie und Klinische Ernährung, Universitätsspital Bern, Switzerland.

The treatment of obesity is complex due to the multifactorial etiology. A modern therapy concept must therefore be tailored to the individual needs and problems and depends on various factors such as degree of obesity, the presence of physical complications, psychological co-morbidities, any treatment measures the patient underwent up to now as well as on motivational factors. Before deciding on a therapeutic measure a structured multidisciplinary cooperation is essential including psychosomatic medicine/psychiatry/psychotherapy, endocrinology, sports medicine, nutritional medicine and surgery as well. The treatment must be carried out in a multidisciplinary team and includes an adequate therapy of comorbidities and sometimes a psychopharmacological support. The success of a conservative treatment of obesity is remarkable and long-lasting and can be straightforwardly compared to bariatric surgery in financial as well as ethical terms, although for patients and their physicians the latter often carries the allure of quick success.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1024/0040-5930/a000372DOI Listing
February 2013

[What is obesity?].

Authors:
Kurt Laederach

Ther Umsch 2013 Feb;70(2):61-72

Universitätspoliklinik für Endokrinologie, Diabetologie und Klinische Ernährung, Universitätsspital Bern, Switzerland.

Morbid obesity is by many seen as one of the biggest challenges to public health in the 21st Century. The World Health Organization (WHO) describes it as the "epidemic of the 21st Century". It is entitled as a major cause of non-communicable chronic diseases and premature deaths. Here, the trend is still increasing: Overweight and obesity do not only pose a serious health problem in industrialized nations, but increasingly also in developing countries. According to WHO the cost estimates of this epidemic is approximated to several billion dollars per year. Also for the cost the tendency is still rising.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1024/0040-5930/a000366DOI Listing
February 2013

[From the corpulent rich to the obese poor].

Praxis (Bern 1994) 2013 Jan;102(2):65-6

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1024/1661-8157/a001186DOI Listing
January 2013

The NutriChip project--translating technology into nutritional knowledge.

Br J Nutr 2012 Sep;108(5):762-8

Federal Department of Economic Affairs, Agroscope Liebefeld-Posieux Research Station ALP, Schwarzenburgstrasse 161, Berne, Switzerland.

Advances in food transformation have dramatically increased the diversity of products on the market and, consequently, exposed consumers to a complex spectrum of bioactive nutrients whose potential risks and benefits have mostly not been confidently demonstrated. Therefore, tools are needed to efficiently screen products for selected physiological properties before they enter the market. NutriChip is an interdisciplinary modular project funded by the Swiss programme Nano-Tera, which groups scientists from several areas of research with the aim of developing analytical strategies that will enable functional screening of foods. The project focuses on postprandial inflammatory stress, which potentially contributes to the development of chronic inflammatory diseases. The first module of the NutriChip project is composed of three in vitro biochemical steps that mimic the digestion process, intestinal absorption, and subsequent modulation of immune cells by the bioavailable nutrients. The second module is a miniaturised form of the first module (gut-on-a-chip) that integrates a microfluidic-based cell co-culture system and super-resolution imaging technologies to provide a physiologically relevant fluid flow environment and allows sensitive real-time analysis of the products screened in vitro. The third module aims at validating the in vitro screening model by assessing the nutritional properties of selected food products in humans. Because of the immunomodulatory properties of milk as well as its amenability to technological transformation, dairy products have been selected as model foods. The NutriChip project reflects the opening of food and nutrition sciences to state-of-the-art technologies, a key step in the translation of transdisciplinary knowledge into nutritional advice.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0007114512002693DOI Listing
September 2012

[Cultural and migration aspects in functional abdominal pain].

Ther Umsch 2011 Aug;68(8):421-33

Universitäts-Poliklinik für Endokrinologie, Diabetologie & Klinische Ernährung, Inselspital/ Universität Bern.

Compared to Europe's mean immigrant contingent of 7.3 to 8.6 % Switzerland holds the highest contingent of foreign population with 23.5 %. Therefore it is of utmost importance that physicians have a knowledge of the specific characteristics of immigrant patients. The influence of personality factors (experience, behavior) is not independent from the influence of culturally-related environmental factors (regional differences in diet, pollutants, meanings, etc.). In addition, different cultural groups rate their quality of life differently. Psychological reasons for recurrent abdominal pain are stress (life events), effects of self-medication (laxatives, cocaine) and sexual abuse but also rare infectious diseases are more common among immigrants (e.g. tuberculosis, histoplasmosis, etc.). Migration-specific characteristics are mainly to find in the semiotics of the symptoms: not every abdominal pain is real pain in the abdomen. Finally, it is crucial to make the distinction between organic, functional and psychological-related pain. This can, however, usually only be accomplished in the context of the entire situation of a patient and, depending on the situation, with the support of a colleague from the appropriate cultural group or an experienced interpreter. In this review we limit ourselves to the presentation of the working population of the migrants, because these represent the largest group of all migrants. The specific situation of asylum seekers will also be refrained to where appropriate.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1024/0040-5930/a000188DOI Listing
August 2011
-->