Publications by authors named "Kubra Kilic"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Evaluation of sleep-disordered breathing and its relationship with respiratory parameters in children with mucopolysaccharidosis Type IVA and VI.

Am J Med Genet A 2021 May 7. Epub 2021 May 7.

Department of Pediatric Pulmonology, School of Medicine, Hacettepe University, Ihsan Dogramaci Children's Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.

The aims of the study were to evaluate the prevalence of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) by using polysomnography (PSG) in children with MPS IVA and MPS VI who underwent enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) and to analyze the effect on SDB of having upper airway surgery, pulmonary functions, and exercise capacity. A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted on patients with MPS IVA (n:17) and MPS VI (n:11) aged under 19 years who underwent polysomnography. Descriptive and nonparametric analyses were performed for demographic, PSG, pulmonary function and exercise capacity variables. The frequency of sleep apnea in the study sample was 85.7% (24/28). Four patients (14.3%) had no sleep apnea, 15 (53.6%) had mild, and nine (32.1%) had moderate-to-severe sleep apnea. Two patients (7.1%) had central sleep apnea and 22 had obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) (78.6%). Forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) were negatively correlated to apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) (r = -0.594, p = .009; r = -0.636, p = .005, respectively). Despite ERT and previous upper airway surgery, the prevalence of OSA was high in patients with MPS IVA-MPS IV, emphasizing the importance of PSG screening for sleep disorders. Pulmonary function tests may be useful for predicting sleep apnea in patients with MPS IVA and MPS VI.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.62229DOI Listing
May 2021

Differential Expressions of Ki-67, Bcl-2, and Apoptosis Index in Endometrial Cells of Women With and Without Type II Diabetes Mellitus and Their Correlation with Clinicopathological Variables.

Reprod Sci 2021 May 15;28(5):1447-1456. Epub 2021 Jan 15.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, Balikesir University, Cagis Yerleskesi Bigadic yolu 17 km pc, 10145, Balikesir, Turkey.

The objective of this study was to investigate proliferation, apoptosis, and antiapoptotic molecule expression in endometrial cells of reproductive-aged women with and without type II diabetes mellitus (T2D). In this case-control study, a total of 80 endometrial tissue specimens from reproductive-aged women (35 in the proliferative phase and 45 in the secretory phase) were examined. The age and body mass index (BMI) were matched between the groups. Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded endometrial tissue samples were used for immunohistochemistry analysis. The presence of proliferation was evaluated with Ki-67 expression, antiapoptotic function of cells was evaluated with Bcl-2 expression, and apoptosis was evaluated with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TUNEL) immunoreactivity in both the glandular epithelium and stroma of endometrial tissue samples from women with and without T2D. Ki-67 expression in the glandular epithelium and Bcl-2 expression in both the glandular epithelium and stroma were significantly higher in endometrial tissue samples of women in the T2D group than the control group (p = 0.0008, p = 0.0022, and p = 0.0261, respectively). TUNEL immunoreactivity was significantly lower in the glandular epithelium of women in the T2D group than the control group (p = 0.0001). Glandular Ki-67 expression correlated positively with BMI, use of insulin, and hemoglobin A1c level (p = 0.0034, p = 0.0154, and p = 0.0011, respectively). Glandular Bcl-2 expression correlated positively with BMI and duration of T2D (p = 0.0090 and p = 0.0109, respectively). Stromal Bcl-2 expression correlated positively with duration of T2D (p = 0.0069). TUNEL immunoreactivity in the glandular epithelium correlated negatively with duration of T2D (p = 0.0340) and positively with the use of oral antidiabetic agents (p = 0.0226). Compared to age and BMI-matched controls, women with T2D experienced increased cell proliferation and decreased apoptosis in the glandular epithelium and increased antiapoptotic function in both the glandular epithelium and stromal cells. High BMI values in women with diabetes seemed to contribute to increased cell proliferation and increased antiapoptotic function in the glandular epithelium but not the stromal cells.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s43032-020-00423-zDOI Listing
May 2021

Investigation of the effects of hesperidin and chrysin on renal injury induced by colistin in rats.

Biomed Pharmacother 2018 Dec 10;108:1607-1616. Epub 2018 Oct 10.

Ankara University, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Ankara, Turkey.

This study aimed to investigate whether hesperidin and chrysin antioxidants have protective effects on renal injury induced by colistin in rats. Renal lipid peroxidation, total glutathione (GSH) levels, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) enzyme activities, serum urea and creatinine levels, as well as tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) levels were determined. Injuries to the proximal and distal tubules were determined using histopathological and double immunohistochemistry examinations. The results showed that hesperidin and chrysin significantly decreased the levels of MDA and inflammatory parameters and significantly increased GSH, SOD, CAT, and GSH-Px levels against colistin-induced renal injury. The results also showed that cystatin C and calbindin D28K immunopositivities significantly increased through hesperidin and chrysin treatment. Hesperidin and chrysin alleviated the renal injury induced by colistin via anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Thus, hesperidin and chrysin could attenuate colistin-induced nephrotoxicity via antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Addition of hesperidin or chrysin to the treatment protocol of colistin treatment might benefit patient treatment in terms of the prevention of colistin-induced renal injury.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopha.2018.10.001DOI Listing
December 2018

Rutin attenuates gentamicin-induced renal damage by reducing oxidative stress, inflammation, apoptosis, and autophagy in rats.

Ren Fail 2015 Apr 23;37(3):518-25. Epub 2015 Jan 23.

Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ataturk University , Yakutiye, Erzurum , Turkey .

Gentamicin is commonly used against gram-negative microorganisms. Its therapeutic use is mainly limited by nephrotoxicity. This study was aimed at evaluating the effect of rutin on oxidative stress, inflammation, apoptosis, and autophagy in gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats. The rats were treated with saline intraperitoneally (group I), 150 mg/kg of rutin orally (group II), 80 mg/kg of gentamicin intraperitoneally for 8 d (group III), or 150 mg/kg of rutin plus 80 mg/kg of gentamicin (group IV). The serum urea, creatinine, kidney malondialdehyde (MDA), and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels and superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity and protein concentration were measured, and renal histopathology analysis and immunohistochemical staining were performed. Rutin pretreatment attenuated nephrotoxicity induced by gentamicin by reducing the urea, creatinine, and MDA levels and increasing the SOD, CAT, and GPx activity, and the GSH levels. The rutin also inhibited inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cleaved caspase-3 and light chain 3B (LC3B), as evidenced by immunohistochemical staining. The present study demonstrates that rutin exhibits antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, and anti-autophagic effects and that it attenuates gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/0886022X.2015.1006100DOI Listing
April 2015