Publications by authors named "Krzysztof Kacperski"

10 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Evaluation of qualitative and quantitative data of Y-90 imaging in SPECT/CT and PET/CT phantom studies.

PLoS One 2021 10;16(2):e0246848. Epub 2021 Feb 10.

National Centre for Nuclear Research, Radioisotope Centre POLATOM, Otwock-Świerk, Poland.

Introduction: We aimed to assess the feasibility of SPECT and PET Y-90 imaging, and to compare these modalities by visualizing hot and cold foci in phantoms for varying isotope concentrations.

Materials And Methods: The data was acquired from the Jaszczak and NEMA phantoms. In the Jaszczak phantom Y-90 concentrations of 0.1 MBq/ml and 0.2 MBq/ml were used, while higher concentrations, up to 1.0 MBq/ml, were simulated by acquisition time extension with respect to the standard clinical protocol of 30 sec/projection for SPECT and 30 min/bed position for PET imaging. For NEMA phantom, the hot foci had concentrations of about 4 MB/ml and the background 0.1 or 0.0 MBq/ml. All of the acquired data was analysed both qualitatively and quantitatively. Qualitative assessment was conducted by six observers asked to identify the number of visible cold or hot foci. Inter-observer agreement was assessed. Quantitative analysis included calculations of contrast and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and comparisons with the qualitative results.

Results: For SPECT data up to two cold foci were discernible, while for PET four foci were visible. We have shown that CNR (with Rose criterion) is a good measure of foci visibility for both modalities. We also found good concordance of qualitative results for the Jaszczak phantom studies between the observers (corresponding Krippendorf's alpha coefficients of 0.76 to 0.84). In the NEMA phantom without background activity all foci were visible in SPECT/CT images. With isotope in the background, 5 of 6 spheres were discernible (CNR of 3.0 for the smallest foci). For PET studies all hot spheres were visible, regardless of the background activity.

Conclusions: PET Y-90 imaging provided better results than Bremsstrahlung based SPECT imaging. This indicates that PET/CT might become the method of choice in Y-90 post radioembolization imaging for visualisation of both necrotic and hot lesions in the liver.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0246848PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7875374PMC
August 2021

NVIDIA OptiX ray-tracing engine as a new tool for modelling medical imaging systems.

Proc SPIE Int Soc Opt Eng 2015 Mar;9412

The Maria Skłodowska - Curie Memorial Cancer Centre and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw, Poland.

The most accurate technique to model the X- and gamma radiation path through a numerically defined object is the Monte Carlo simulation which follows single photons according to their interaction probabilities. A simplified and much faster approach, which just integrates total interaction probabilities along selected paths, is known as ray tracing. Both techniques are used in medical imaging for simulating real imaging systems and as projectors required in iterative tomographic reconstruction algorithms. These approaches are ready for massive parallel implementation e.g. on Graphics Processing Units (GPU), which can greatly accelerate the computation time at a relatively low cost. In this paper we describe the application of the NVIDIA OptiX ray-tracing engine, popular in professional graphics and rendering applications, as a new powerful tool for X- and gamma ray-tracing in medical imaging. It allows the implementation of a variety of physical interactions of rays with pixel-, mesh- or nurbs-based objects, and recording any required quantities, like path integrals, interaction sites, deposited energies, and others. Using the OptiX engine we have implemented a code for rapid Monte Carlo simulations of Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) imaging, as well as the ray-tracing projector, which can be used in reconstruction algorithms. The engine generates efficient, scalable and optimized GPU code, ready to run on multi GPU heterogeneous systems. We have compared the results our simulations with the GATE package. With the OptiX engine the computation time of a Monte Carlo simulation can be reduced from days to minutes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.2082349DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6037296PMC
March 2015

Persistent colonization of 2 hospital water supplies by L. pneumophila strains through 7 years--sequence-based typing and serotyping as useful tools for a complex risk analysis.

Ann Agric Environ Med 2013 ;20(4):687-94

National Institute of Public Health - National Institute of Hygiene, Warsaw, Poland.

Contamination with Legionella spp. of hot water system (HWS) in hospitals is a considerable problem and elimination of bacteria poses difficulties. Obligatory control of Legionella spp. in hospital HWS was implemented in Poland in 2008y. After that, Legionella spp. has been isolated repeatedly from HWS of the majority of hospitals. The aim of our study was to confirm the permanent colonization with Legionella spp. of 2 hospital HWSs based on the antigenic (serogroup/subgroups) and genetic properties (SBT, rtxA) of L.pneumophila strains isolated in 2004-2011. The dynamic of L.pneumophila population was also examined due to methods of disinfections applied during 7 years. Totally, 134 environmental samples were collected from two hospitals in 2004-2011 (118 from HWSs). During the study disinfection by chlorine dioxide was implemented in both hospitals, while thermal shock was added in the hospital A. Isolated L.pneumophila were serogrouped (105 strains) using Dresden MAb Panel, genotyped by sequence based typing (53) and by harboring of rtxA gene (58 isolates). Legionella spp. were still presented in both systems after 7 years. Exactly the same strains (ST1, ST87, ST114, ST992) were found in the hospital B. While changes of L.pneumophila population were observed in the hospital A: strains still occurred after 7 years (ST835 Sg6, ST114 Sg6); modified antigenic properties (ST835 - Sg12 vs. Sg6); eliminated or maybe not detected (ST81, ST838, ST959). Moreover, the majority of examined strains ST1 (Sg1, OLDA) harboured rtxA gene (hospital B). Our results and data in the EWGLI SBT base indicated higher risk of Legionella infection in the hospital B than A--because of heavy colonization with L.pneumophila ST1. The risk assessment of Legionella infection based only on technical parameters, extent of colonization/contamination level may be not completed. It should be supplemented with the additional examination: serotyping, genotyping and virulence testing of isolated strains.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
August 2014

Fast and accurate rotator for rotation-based iterative reconstruction algorithms

IEEE Nucl Sci Symp Conf Rec (1997) 2013 Oct-Nov;2012:3295-3297. Epub 2013 Jul 8.

Maria Skłodowska - Curie Memorial Cancer Centre and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw, Poland

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6031292PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/NSSMIC.2012.6551751DOI Listing
July 2013

Iterative deconvolution of simultaneous 99mTc and 201Tl projection data measured on a CdZnTe-based cardiac SPECT scanner.

Phys Med Biol 2011 Mar 11;56(5):1397-414. Epub 2011 Feb 11.

Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London, London, UK.

We present a method of correcting self-scatter and crosstalk effects in simultaneous technetium-99m/thallium-201 stress/rest myocardial perfusion (single photon emission computed tomography) SPECT scans. The method, which is in essence a hybrid between the triple energy window method and scatter modelling, is based on a model of spatial and spectral distribution of projection counts in several selected energy windows. The parameters of the model are determined from measurements of thin rod sources in air when no in-object scatter or attenuation effects are present. The model equations are solved using the iterative maximum likelihood expectation maximization algorithm in the projection space to find estimates of the primary photopeak counts of both radionuclides. The method has been developed particularly for a novel dedicated cardiac camera based on CdZnTe pixellated detectors, although it can also be adapted to a conventional scintillator camera. The method has been validated in anthropomorphic phantom experiments. Significant improvement in defect contrast has been observed with only moderate increase in image noise. The application of the method to patient data is illustrated.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0031-9155/56/5/012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3111906PMC
March 2011

Attenuation correction in SPECT without attenuation map.

IEEE Nucl Sci Symp Conf Rec (1997) 2011

Maria Skłodowska - Curie Memorial Cancer Centre and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw, Poland ( ).

A method of attenuation correction in Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT), based on emission data only is presented. The algorithm uses the well known Helgason-Ludwig consistency conditions. However, it does not attempt to find the attenuation map, but rather the correction factors for the projection data, which makes the problem simpler and does not need to assume any particular template of the attenuation map. Although the method alone gives only approximate correction, it can be combined with other approaches to provide an effective improvement for scanning systems without the transmission scan functionality.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/NSSMIC.2011.6153725DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3837215PMC
January 2011

Simultaneous dual-radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging with a solid-state dedicated cardiac camera.

Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging 2010 Aug 11;37(9):1710-21. Epub 2010 Apr 11.

Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London Hospitals NHS Trust, London, UK.

Purpose: We compared simultaneous dual-radionuclide (DR) stress and rest myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with a novel solid-state cardiac camera and a conventional SPECT camera with separate stress and rest acquisitions.

Methods: Of 27 consecutive patients recruited, 24 (64.5+/-11.8 years of age, 16 men) were injected with 74 MBq of (201)Tl (rest) and 250 MBq (99m)Tc-MIBI (stress). Conventional MPI acquisition times for stress and rest are 21 min and 16 min, respectively. Rest (201)Tl for 6 min and simultaneous DR 15-min list mode gated scans were performed on a D-SPECT cardiac scanner. In 11 patients DR D-SPECT was performed first and in 13 patients conventional stress (99m)Tc-MIBI SPECT imaging was performed followed by DR D-SPECT. The DR D-SPECT data were processed using a spill-over and scatter correction method. DR D-SPECT images were compared with rest (201)Tl D-SPECT and with conventional SPECT images by visual analysis employing the 17-segment model and a five-point scale (0 normal, 4 absent) to calculate the summed stress and rest scores. Image quality was assessed on a four-point scale (1 poor, 4 very good) and gut activity was assessed on a four-point scale (0 none, 3 high).

Results: Conventional MPI studies were abnormal at stress in 17 patients and at rest in 9 patients. In the 17 abnormal stress studies DR D-SPECT MPI showed 113 abnormal segments and conventional MPI showed 93 abnormal segments. In the nine abnormal rest studies DR D-SPECT showed 45 abnormal segments and conventional MPI showed 48 abnormal segments. The summed stress and rest scores on conventional SPECT and DR D-SPECT were highly correlated (r=0.9790 and 0.9694, respectively). The summed scores of rest (201)Tl D-SPECT and DR-DSPECT were also highly correlated (r=0.9968, p<0.0001 for all). In six patients stress perfusion defects were significantly larger on stress DR D-SPECT images, and five of these patients were imaged earlier by D-SPECT than by conventional SPECT.

Conclusion: Fast and high-quality simultaneous DR MPI is feasible with D-SPECT in a single imaging session with comparable diagnostic performance and image quality to conventional SPECT and to a separate rest (201)Tl D-SPECT acquisition.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00259-010-1441-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3108881PMC
August 2010

Performance evaluation of D-SPECT: a novel SPECT system for nuclear cardiology.

Phys Med Biol 2009 May 8;54(9):2635-49. Epub 2009 Apr 8.

Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London, Dean van Foundation Trust, London, UK.

D-SPECT (Spectrum Dynamics, Israel) is a novel SPECT system for cardiac perfusion studies. Based on CZT detectors, region-centric scanning, high-sensitivity collimators and resolution recovery, it offers potential advantages over conventional systems. A series of measurements were made on a beta-version D-SPECT system in order to evaluate its performance in terms of energy resolution, scatter fraction, sensitivity, count rate capability and resolution. Corresponding measurements were also done on a conventional SPECT system (CS) for comparison. The energy resolution of the D-SPECT system at 140 keV was 5.5% (CS: 9.25%), the scatter fraction 30% (CS: 34%), the planar sensitivity 398 s(-1) MBq(-1) per head ((99m)Tc, 10 cm) (CS: 72 s(-1) MBq(-1)), and the tomographic sensitivity in the heart region was in the range 647-1107 s(-1) MBq(-1) (CS: 141 s(-1) MBq(-1)). The count rate increased linearly with increasing activity up to 1.44 M s(-1). The intrinsic resolution was equal to the pixel size, 2.46 mm (CS: 3.8 mm). The average reconstructed resolution using the standard clinical filter was 12.5 mm (CS: 13.7 mm). The D-SPECT has superior sensitivity to that of a conventional system with similar spatial resolution. It also has excellent energy resolution and count rate characteristics, which should prove useful in dynamic and dual radionuclide studies.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0031-9155/54/9/003DOI Listing
May 2009

Performance of three-photon PET imaging: Monte Carlo simulations.

Phys Med Biol 2005 Dec 23;50(23):5679-95. Epub 2005 Nov 23.

Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, UK.

We have recently introduced the idea of making use of three-photon positron annihilations in positron emission tomography. In this paper, the basic characteristics of the three-gamma imaging in PET are studied by means of Monte Carlo simulations and analytical computations. Two typical configurations of human and small animal scanners are considered. Three-photon imaging requires high-energy resolution detectors. Parameters currently attainable by CdZnTe semiconductor detectors, the technology of choice for the future development of radiation imaging, are assumed. Spatial resolution is calculated as a function of detector energy resolution and size, position in the field of view, scanner size and the energies of the three-gamma annihilation photons. Possible ways to improve the spatial resolution obtained for nominal parameters, 1.5 cm and 3.2 mm FWHM for human and small animal scanners, respectively, are indicated. Counting rates of true and random three-photon events for typical human and small animal scanning configurations are assessed. A simple formula for minimum size of lesions detectable in the three-gamma based images is derived. Depending on the contrast and total number of registered counts, lesions of a few mm size for human and sub mm for small animal scanners can be detected.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0031-9155/50/23/019DOI Listing
December 2005

Three-gamma annihilation imaging in positron emission tomography.

IEEE Trans Med Imaging 2004 Apr;23(4):525-9

It is argued that positron annihilation into three photons, although quite rare, could still be used as a new imaging modality of positron emission tomography. The information gained when the three decay photons are detected is significantly higher than in the case of 511 keV two-gamma annihilation. The performance of three-gamma imaging in terms of the required detector properties, spatial resolution and counting rates is discussed. A simple proof-of-principle experiment confirms the feasibility of the new imaging method.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/TMI.2004.824150DOI Listing
April 2004
-->