Publications by authors named "Krista Fritz"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Genome-wide association study implicates testis-sperm specific FKBP6 as a susceptibility locus for impaired acrosome reaction in stallions.

PLoS Genet 2012 20;8(12):e1003139. Epub 2012 Dec 20.

Department of Veterinary Integrative Biosciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, USA.

Impaired acrosomal reaction (IAR) of sperm causes male subfertility in humans and animals. Despite compelling evidence about the genetic control over acrosome biogenesis and function, the genomics of IAR is as yet poorly understood, providing no molecular tools for diagnostics. Here we conducted Equine SNP50 Beadchip genotyping and GWAS using 7 IAR-affected and 37 control Thoroughbred stallions. A significant (P<6.75E-08) genotype-phenotype association was found in horse chromosome 13 in FK506 binding protein 6 (FKBP6). The gene belongs to the immunophilins FKBP family known to be involved in meiosis, calcium homeostasis, clathrin-coated vesicles, and membrane fusions. Direct sequencing of FKBP6 exons in cases and controls identified SNPs g.11040315G>A and g.11040379C>A (p.166H>N) in exon 4 that were significantly associated with the IAR phenotype both in the GWAS cohort (n = 44) and in a large multi-breed cohort of 265 horses. All IAR stallions were homozygous for the A-alleles, while this genotype was found only in 2% of controls. The equine FKBP6 was exclusively expressed in testis and sperm and had 5 different transcripts, of which 4 were novel. The expression of this gene in AC/AG heterozygous controls was monoallelic, and we observed a tendency for FKBP6 up-regulation in IAR stallions compared to controls. Because exon 4 SNPs had no effect on the protein structure, it is likely that FKBP6 relates to the IAR phenotype via regulatory or modifying functions. In conclusion, FKBP6 was considered a susceptibility gene of incomplete penetrance for IAR in stallions and a candidate gene for male subfertility in mammals. FKBP6 genotyping is recommended for the detection of IAR-susceptible individuals among potential breeding stallions. Successful use of sperm as a source of DNA and RNA propagates non-invasive sample procurement for fertility genomics in animals and humans.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1003139DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3527208PMC
May 2013

A high resolution RH map of the bovine major histocompatibility complex.

BMC Genomics 2009 Apr 24;10:182. Epub 2009 Apr 24.

Department of Veterinary Integrative Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843-4458, USA.

Background: The cattle MHC is termed the bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA) and, along with the MHCs of other ruminants, is unique in its genomic organization. Consequently, correct and reliable gene maps and sequence information are critical to the study of the BoLA region. The bovine genome sequencing project has produced two assemblies (Btau_3.1 and 4.0) that differ substantially from each other and from conventional gene maps in the BoLA region. To independently compare the accuracies of the different sequence assemblies, we have generated a high resolution map of BoLA using a 12,000rad radiation hybrid panel. Seventy-seven unique sequence tagged site (STS) markers chosen at approximately 50 kb intervals from the Btau 2.0 assembly and spanning the IIa-III-I and IIb regions of the bovine MHC were mapped on a 12,000rad bovine radiation hybrid (RH) panel to evaluate the different assemblies of the bovine genome sequence.

Results: Analysis of the data generated a high resolution RH map of BoLA that was significantly different from the Btau_3.1 assembly of the bovine genome but in good agreement with the Btau_4.0 assembly. Of the few discordancies between the RH map and Btau_4.0, most could be attributed to closely spaced markers that could not be precisely ordered in the RH panel. One probable incorrectly-assembled sequence and three missing sequences were noted in the Btau_4.0 assembly. The RH map of BoLA is also highly concordant with the sequence-based map of HLA (NCBI build 36) when reordered to account for the ancestral inversion in the ruminant MHC.

Conclusion: These results strongly suggest that studies using Btau_3.1 for analyses of the BoLA region should be reevaluated in light of the Btau_4.0 assembly and indicate that additional research is needed to produce a complete assembly of the BoLA genomic sequences.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2164-10-182DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2682492PMC
April 2009

The genome sequence of taurine cattle: a window to ruminant biology and evolution.

Science 2009 Apr;324(5926):522-8

To understand the biology and evolution of ruminants, the cattle genome was sequenced to about sevenfold coverage. The cattle genome contains a minimum of 22,000 genes, with a core set of 14,345 orthologs shared among seven mammalian species of which 1217 are absent or undetected in noneutherian (marsupial or monotreme) genomes. Cattle-specific evolutionary breakpoint regions in chromosomes have a higher density of segmental duplications, enrichment of repetitive elements, and species-specific variations in genes associated with lactation and immune responsiveness. Genes involved in metabolism are generally highly conserved, although five metabolic genes are deleted or extensively diverged from their human orthologs. The cattle genome sequence thus provides a resource for understanding mammalian evolution and accelerating livestock genetic improvement for milk and meat production.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1169588DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2943200PMC
April 2009

Characterization of the porcine ATM gene: towards the generation of a novel non-murine animal model for Ataxia-Telangiectasia.

Gene 2007 Dec 30;405(1-2):27-35. Epub 2007 Aug 30.

Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1201 W. Gregory Dr., Urbana, IL 61801, USA.

Ataxia-Telangiectasia (A-T) is a genetic disorder causing cerebellar degeneration, immune deficiency, cancer predisposition, chromosomal instability and radiation sensitivity. Among the mutations responsible for A-T, 85% represent truncating mutations that result in the production of shorter, highly unstable forms of ATM (AT-mutated) protein leading to a null ATM phenotype. Several ATM-deficient mice have been created however none reflects the extent of neurological degeneration observed in humans. In an attempt to identify an alternative animal model, we have characterized the porcine ortholog of ATM (pATM). When compared to the human ATM (hATM), the pATM showed a high level of homology in the coding region, particularly in the regions coding for functional domains, and had extensive alternative splicing of the 5'UTR, characteristic for the human ATM mRNA. Six different 5'UTRs resulting from alternative splicing of the first three exons were identified. The porcine 5'UTRs varied in size, had multiple ATG codons and different secondary structures, supporting the possibility of complex transcriptional regulation. Three of the six transcripts demonstrated alternative splicing of exon 3, the first putative coding exon, altering the translation start and giving rise to a putative protein lacking the N-terminus substrate binding domain (82-89 aa) involved in activation of human p53 and BRCA1 pathways. Real time-PCR analysis revealed variable expression levels of total ATM transcripts in individual tissues. Although each splice variant was ubiquitously expressed among the tissues, differences in the relative abundances of specific 5'UTRs were observed. The extensive alternative splicing of the pATM gene resembles the complex splicing observed in the hATM and could provide insights for differences observed between mice and humans with regards to the onset of A-T. Thus, the pig may provide a more relevant clinical model of A-T.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gene.2007.08.014DOI Listing
December 2007
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