Publications by authors named "Koto Kawata"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Prognostic Impact of Lymphocyte-C-Reactive Protein Ratio in Patients Who Underwent Surgical Resection for Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

J Gastrointest Surg 2021 Jul 13. Epub 2021 Jul 13.

Department of Surgery, Hiroshima Red Cross Hospital and Atomic-bomb Survivors Hospital, Hiroshima, 730-0052, Japan.

Background: Systemic inflammation-related factors, either independently or in combination, are recognized as prognostic factors for various cancers. The ratio of lymphocyte count to C-reactive protein concentration (lymphocyte-CRP ratio; LCR) is a recently identified prognostic marker for several cancers. Here, we examined the prognostic value of the LCR in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).

Methods: This was a single-center retrospective study of patients who underwent surgical resection for HCC between 2004 and 2017. Patients were divided into high- and low-LCR status groups, and the relationships between LCR status, prognosis, and other clinicopathological characteristics were analyzed.

Results: A total of 454 patients with HCC were enrolled and assigned to the high- (n=245) or low- (n=209) LCR groups. Compared with the high-LCR group, patients in the low-LCR group had a significantly lower serum albumin level (median 4.1 vs. 3.9 g/dL, P <0.0001), lower platelet count (median 14.0 vs. 12.0 ×10/μL, P=0.0468), lower prothrombin time (median 93.2 vs. 89.6 %, P=0.0006), and larger tumor size (median 2.3 vs. 2.5 cm, P=0.0056). Patients with low-LCR status had significantly worse outcomes of overall survival and disease-free survival than patients with high-LCR status (P=0.0003 and P=0.0069, respectively). Low-LCR status was significantly associated with worse overall survival in multivariate analysis (hazard ratio 1.57, 95% confidence interval 1.14-2.17, P=0.0058).

Conclusions: Low-LCR status may predict worse outcomes in patients with HCC. Measurement of LCR is routine and can easily be applied for risk stratification in the assessment of patients with HCC.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11605-021-05085-zDOI Listing
July 2021

Hepatic resection for recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma during pregnancy: a case report.

Surg Case Rep 2020 Sep 29;6(1):229. Epub 2020 Sep 29.

Department of Surgery, Hiroshima Red Cross Hospital and Atomic-Bomb Survivors Hospital, 1-9-6 Senda-machi, Naka-ku, Hiroshima, 730-8619, Japan.

Background: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) during pregnancy is extremely rare. Treatment strategies for cancers detected during pregnancy have been controversial. We herein report a case of recurrent HCC detected at 20 weeks of pregnancy, which subsequently prompted hepatic resection after abortion.

Case Presentation: A 36-year-old woman underwent laparoscopic partial hepatectomy for HCC (20 mm in diameter) in segment 5 of the liver during follow-up after being determined as a hepatitis B virus carrier two and a half years ago. Post-surgery follow-up abdominal ultrasonography revealed a 36-mm tumor in segment 7 of the liver. Abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed a well-enhanced tumor with a 40-mm diameter in segment 7 adjacent to the inferior vena cava and right hepatic vein, suggesting HCC recurrence. Laboratory data revealed total bilirubin (0.4 mg/dL), aspartate aminotransferase (28 IU/L), alanine aminotransferase (30 IU/L), glutamyltransferase (16 IU/L), prothrombin time (115.3%), and indocyanine green retention rate at 15 min (7.0%). α-Fetoprotein (AFP) (12,371.5 ng/mL; normal range < 10 ng/mL) and PIVKA-II (208 mAU/mL; normal range < 40 mAU/mL) were both significantly elevated. After discussions with a cancer board consisting of experts from the departments of gastroenterology, obstetrics and gynecology, and surgery, as well as obtaining appropriate informed consent from the patient and her family, we decided to perform a hepatic resection after abortion. Subsequently, abortion surgery was performed at 21 weeks and 2 days of pregnancy. After 6 days, subsegmentectomy of liver segment 7 was performed under general and epidural anesthesia, with a pathological diagnosis which was moderately differentiated HCC being established. Given the good postoperative course, without particular complications, the patient was subsequently discharged 10 days after the operation. Approximately 2 years after the surgery, the patient remains alive without recurrence, while both AFP and PIVKA-II were within normal limits.

Conclusions: Treatment strategies for HCC detected during pregnancy remain controversial. As such, decisions should be made based on HCC growth and fetal maturity after thorough multidisciplinary team discussions and obtaining appropriate informed consent from the patient and her family.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40792-020-00985-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7524929PMC
September 2020

Large surgically resected leiomyosarcoma of the liver: a case report.

Surg Case Rep 2020 Jul 9;6(1):168. Epub 2020 Jul 9.

Department of Surgery, Hiroshima Red Cross Hospital and Atomic-bomb Survivors Hospital, 1-9-6 Senda-machi, Naka-ku, Hiroshima 730-8619, Japan.

Background: Primary hepatic leiomyosarcoma (PHL) is an extremely rare type of tumor. We herein report a case of a large surgically resected leiomyosarcoma of the liver.

Case Presentation: A 69-year-old man with a feeling of epigastric compression was referred for examination of an abdominal mass. He had no history of liver disease or alcohol abuse. Liver function tests indicated Child-Pugh class A. Tumor markers were negative. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a relatively well-contrasted 12 × 11 × 8 cm tumor with well-defined boundary replacing the lateral segment of the liver alongside multiple intrahepatic metastases. Several nodules up to 12 mm were found in both lungs, suggestive of metastasis. SUVmax of the liver mass and lung tumor in positron emission tomography were 10.4 and 1.5, respectively. Hepatocellular carcinoma was primarily suspected. Lateral segmentectomy of the liver was performed to confirm diagnosis and prevent tumor rupture. Macroscopically, the lateral segment of the liver had been replaced by a lobular or multinodular tumor with a maximum diameter of 15 cm. In pathological findings, the tumor consisted of bundle-like proliferation of complicated banding spindle-like cells with clear cytoplasm, accompanied by storiform pattern and compressed blood vessels. Nuclear fission images were observed in 8/10 HPF. Partial necrosis was present, with associated venous invasion and intrahepatic metastasis. Immunohistochemical staining for tumor cells revealed desmin, α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA), and h-caldesmon were all positive, informing a final diagnosis of PHL. The postoperative course was uneventful, and he was discharged on the 12th postoperative day.

Conclusions: PHL is a rare malignant disease with relatively poor prognosis. To confirm a diagnosis of PHL, immunohistochemical analysis as well as histopathological findings is important. The preferred treatment is surgical resection, sometimes in combination with adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Further studies are needed to elucidate and better understand this uncommon clinical entity.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40792-020-00934-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7347740PMC
July 2020

Mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma of the distal bile duct: a case report.

Surg Case Rep 2020 Jul 6;6(1):160. Epub 2020 Jul 6.

Department of Surgery, Hiroshima Red Cross Hospital and Atomic-bomb Survivors Hospital, 1-9-6 Senda-machi, Naka-ku, Hiroshima, 730-8619, Japan.

Background: Mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC) of the common bile duct (CBD) is very rare, with only 10 reported cases. Here, we report a case of MANEC of the distal bile duct (DBD) that was surgically resected under a diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA).

Case Presentation: A 60-year-old male had epigastric pain and was admitted to our hospital for the treatment of a suspected CBD stone. Upon admission, laboratory findings revealed elevated hepatobiliary enzymes including serum aspartate aminotransferase, serum alanine aminotransferase, serum glutamyltransferase, and serum alkaline phosphatase. Both carcinoembryonic antigen and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 were negative. Computed tomography (CT) showed dilation of the CBD. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) showed circumferential stenosis and a 5-mm elevated lesion in the DBD. Brush cytology showed atypical ductal cells, indicating adenocarcinoma (AC) of the DBD. Under a diagnosis of CCA of the DBD, a subtotal stomach-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed. Neither peritoneal dissemination nor lymph node metastasis was found. Microscopically, the lesion was seen to be composed of predominantly well-differentiated tubular AC in the superficial layer of the tumor, admixed with neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) in the deeper portion, indicating a diagnosis of MANEC of the DBD. After immunohistochemical staining, NEC components were positive for synaptophysin and CD56 and were for SSTR2, SSTR5, and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Three months postsurgery, postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with S-1 was started. More than 3 years postsurgery, he is alive without recurrence.

Conclusions: MANEC is highly malignant, progresses rapidly, and has a poor prognosis. Preoperative diagnosis is difficult; therefore, identifying NEC components by immunohistochemical staining using resected specimens is important.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40792-020-00921-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7338298PMC
July 2020

A case of perforation of Meckel's diverticulum with enterolith.

Surg Case Rep 2020 Jul 6;6(1):161. Epub 2020 Jul 6.

Department of Surgery, Hiroshima Red Cross Hospital and Atomic-bomb Survivors Hospital, 1-9-6 Senda-machi, Naka-ku, Hiroshima, 730-8619, Japan.

Background: Perforation of Meckel's diverticulum with enteroliths is a rare complication. Here, we report a case of perforation of Meckel's diverticulum with one enterolith, which could not be accurately diagnosed by preoperative computed tomography.

Case Presentation: A 16-year-old male patient with acute onset of severe abdominal pain and a localized muscle guarding in the right hypochondrium had a solitary stone detected in the right abdomen by radiography. Abdominal computed tomography revealed a saclike outpouching of the small intestine, which contained fluid levels and an enterolith, with a mesenteric inflammatory change in the right paraumbilical area. He was diagnosed with peritonitis due to appendicitis or Meckel's diverticulitis with enterolith, and emergency operation was indicated. The perforated Meckel's diverticulum was identified approximately 30 cm proximal to the ileocecal valve. The diverticulum was transected at the base and removed. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful.

Conclusions: It is crucial for clinicians to thoroughly examine patients and appropriately request investigations that consider perforation of Meckel's diverticulum as a possible diagnosis to facilitate prompt treatment.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40792-020-00926-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7338335PMC
July 2020

ROS1-rearranged putative lung adenocarcinoma presenting as carcinoma of unknown primary site: a case report.

Oncotarget 2018 Oct 16;9(81):35278-35282. Epub 2018 Oct 16.

Department of Molecular and Internal Medicine, Institute of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Minami-ku, Hiroshima, Japan.

Carcinoma of unknown primary site (CUP) is diagnosed only in 2-9% of all cancer cases. Adenocarcinomas account for approximately 60% of CUP, and some of these are putative lung adenocarcinomas. The frequency of driver oncogene positivity in the putative lung adenocarcinomas is unknown, and the efficacy of targeting therapies for the driver oncogene is also unknown. This is the first case report of C-ros oncogene 1 (ROS1)-rearranged putative lung adenocarcinoma presenting as CUP showing a good response to ROS1 inhibitor therapy. A 55-year-old woman presented with neck lymphadenopathy. Computed tomography and [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) showed swelling of the bilateral supraclavicular, left accessory, mediastinal, and abdominal lymph nodes. The pathological analysis of the lymph node specimen biopsy indicated adenocarcinoma with cytokeratin 7 and thyroid transcription factor-1 positivity. Thus, this case was identified as ROS1- rearranged putative lung adenocarcinoma presenting as CUP. Oral crizotinib, an ROS1 inhibitor, was administered at a dose of 250 mg twice daily. Four weeks later, several swollen nodes showed marked improvement, and eight weeks later, FDG PET showed almost no uptake. In conclusion, putative lung adenocarcinoma presenting as CUP may involve ROS1 rearrangement, and ROS1 inhibitor therapy may be effective.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.26233DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6219662PMC
October 2018
-->