Publications by authors named "Konstantinos G Makridis"

20 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Frequency of sternal variations and anomalies in living individuals evaluated by MDCT.

Eur J Radiol 2021 Sep 24;142:109828. Epub 2021 Jun 24.

Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Thessaly, Biopolis, 41110 Larissa, Greece.

Purpose: The aim of this retrospective study was to present the frequency and MDCT appearances of sternal variations and anomalies, as well as to highlight their clinical significance.

Methods: This retrospective study was carried out on 1150 patients, who underwent chest MDCT. Axial planes, multiplanar and curved-planar reconstructed images were studied. Age and sex distribution of the variations was evaluated.

Results: Anatomical variations of the sternum were found in 74.1%. The most frequent variation was the double-ended xiphoid process (36.9%), followed by the single xiphoidal foramen (25.8%) and the sternal sclerotic band (12.8%). Other variations observed were: sternal notch (10.1%), xiphoidal ligament calcification (8.3%), sternal foramen (4.9%), complete manubriosternal fusion (4.1%) and sternoxiphoidal fusion (4.1%), triple-ended xiphoid process (3.7%), sternal cleft (1.5%), whereas the rest of the variations including sternoxiphoidal junction pseudoforamen, suprasternal bone, pseudocleft, suprasternal tubercle and absence of xiphoid process were in less than 1%. In our subjects, sternal and xiphoidal foramina were adjacent to: the pericardium (37.14%), the diaphragm (22.9%), the mediastinal fat (17.1%), the liver (11.4%), the lung (8.5%) and to the stomach (2.9%).

Conclusions: Sternal variations are frequent, asymptomatic, detected incidentally at cross-sectional imaging and may be confused with pathologic conditions. Radiologists should be familiar with these variations in order to discriminate them from pathologies and avoid complications during interventional procedures.

Advances In Knowledge: This study presents thoroughly the sternal variations' MDCT appearance, detected in a Greek population, correlates them with age and gender and discuss their clinical significance in detail.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejrad.2021.109828DOI Listing
September 2021

Facial nerve: A review of the anatomical, surgical landmarks and its iatrogenic injuries.

Injury 2021 Aug 21;52(8):2038-2048. Epub 2021 May 21.

Anatomy Department Morphology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Thessaly, Larissa, Greece. Electronic address:

Facial nerve iatrogenic injuries are serious and can negatively affect the quality of life of the patients. Due to the properties of the nerve, the complications are devastating involving the aesthetic appearance and the function of the face. Moreover, the multiple branches of the nerve increase the risk of an iatrogenic injury making the detailed knowledge of the anatomical correlations around them critical. In this review, a meticulous analysis was performed including the surgical procedures posing the greater risk of an iatrogenic injury as well as the full description of all the reported anatomical landmarks involving the extracranial course of the facial nerve.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.injury.2021.05.029DOI Listing
August 2021

Amyand's hernia: presumptive diagnosis by CT and literature review.

Radiol Case Rep 2021 Apr 9;16(4):911-915. Epub 2021 Feb 9.

Radiologist, Department of Radiology, IASO Thessaly, Larissa, Greece.

Amyand's hernia is a rare inguinal hernia containing the appendix presenting mainly in male adults. The clinical presentation is usually without symptoms, however an inflammation can occur leading to strangulation, necrosis or rupture of the appendix. Differential diagnosis may be difficult including orchitis, testicular torsion, inflammation of the ovaries and bowel inflammation. We present a case of a 61 years old, male patient who was presented with persistent right abdominal pain. There was no medical history of previous hospitalization or surgery of the abdomen. Laboratory tests and radiological investigation with plain radiographs and ultrasound were not clear. A CT scan with contrast imaging was performed to reveal the diagnosis. Amyand's hernia is difficult to be revealed and a high index of suspicion is needed in order to promptly diagnose the hernia and proceed to the appropriate treatment. CT scan is critical contributing to the accurate depiction and to the classification of the hernia.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.radcr.2021.01.057DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7878980PMC
April 2021

Searching for the 'winner' hip fracture patient: the effect of modifiable and non-modifiable factors on clinical outcomes following hip fracture surgery.

Hip Int 2021 Jan 23;31(1):115-124. Epub 2019 Sep 23.

Orthopaedic Department, University General Hospital of Larissa, Greece.

Background: Various factors, other than the quality of surgery, may influence clinical outcomes of hip fracture patients. We aimed to evaluate the relative impact of several factors on functional outcome, quality of life, re-fracture and mortality rates following surgery for hip fractures.

Methods: We studied 498 (62.2%) women and 302 (37.8%) men with a mean age of 81.3 years (range, 60-95) with hip fractures (femoral neck and pertrochanteric). The mean follow-up was 74 months (range 58-96). Various patient-related and surgery-related parameters were recorded and correlated to both objective and subjective mobility, functional recovery and quality of life scales. Mortality and re-fracture rates were also evaluated.

Results: Using multiple regression analysis, age >80 years ( 0.000; 95% CI, 1.077-1.143) and ASA score III and IV ( 0.000; 95% CI, 2.088-3.396) (both non-modifiable factors) both proved to be independent (s.s.) factors affecting mortality rates. Age <80 years ( 0.000; 95% CI, 0.932-0.974), surgery delay less (modifiable factor) than 48 hours ( 0.046; 95% CI, 0.869-0.999), low dementia CDR index ( 0.005; 95% CI, 0.471-0.891) (non-modifiable factor), and osteoporosis medical treatment (modifiable factor) ( 0.006; 95% CI, 0.494-0.891) were shown to be independent (s.s.) factors affecting HOOS-symptoms. Osteoporosis medical treatment used proved to be an independent (s.s.) factor affecting HOOS-daily activities ( 0.049; 95% CI, 0.563-1.000) and quality of life (E-Qol-5D) ( 0.036; 95% CI, 0.737-1.325).

Conclusions: A hip fracture patient aged <80 years old, with an ASA I-II, with low dementia CDR index and on osteoporosis medication has a better chance of an improved outcome (winner patient).
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1120700019878814DOI Listing
January 2021

Complications After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction and Their Relation to the Type of Graft: A Prospective Study of 958 Cases.

Am J Sports Med 2019 09 12;47(11):2543-2549. Epub 2019 Aug 12.

Cabinet Goethe, Paris, France.

Background: Complications and adverse events after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction are well known, but they have been underestimated in previous studies.

Purpose: To describe the complications and adverse events after ACL reconstruction within a 2-year follow-up and analyze them in relation to the type of graft.

Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3.

Methods: From 2000 to 2012, 958 patients with an isolated ACL injury underwent surgery by a single knee surgeon. ACL reconstruction was performed with the medial portal technique for the femoral tunnel and the use of bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) or hamstring tendon graft. Patients were reviewed at 6 weeks and 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery with the International Knee Documentation Committee score, plain radiographs, and the KT-1000 arthrometer.

Results: Of 958 patients enrolled, 147 (15%) were lost at last follow-up. The 2 groups (bone-patellar tendon-bone [n = 257] and hamstring [n = 554]) were similar regarding the mean age at the time of surgery and preoperative anterior laxity. The main complications were as follows: anterior knee pain (n = 130 of 811, 16%), stiffness (n = 72, 8.8%), secondary meniscal lesions (n = 59, 7.2%), pain attributed to fixation (n = 79, 9.7%), ACL rerupture (n = 47, 5.7%), contralateral ACL ruptures (n = 24, 3%), patellar fractures (n = 3, 0.3%), infections (n = 9, 1%), and thromboembolic complications (n = 5, 0.6%). There was no significant difference between the grafts with respect to the frequency of joint stiffness, secondary meniscal lesions, or anterior knee pain. During the first 2 postoperative years, the percentage of patients with anterior knee pain was higher in the patellar tendon group (23.3% vs 12.6%, < .001); however, this difference was not significant after the 2-year interval (3.1% vs 2.5%, = .63). The percentage of patients with a rerupture of the graft was significantly lower in the patellar tendon group than in the hamstring group (25 of 811 [3.1%] vs 57 of 811 [7%], = .023). Similar results were recorded regarding the pain related to the hardware material (7 of 811 [0.8%] in the BPTB group vs 113 of 811 [13.9%] in the hamstring group, = .001). The percentage of ACL ruptures contralateral to the repair was higher in the patellar tendon group (41 of 811 [5%] vs 17 of 811 [2%], = .016).

Conclusion: The total rate of complications after an ACL reconstruction was 39%, and the surgical revision rate for any reason was 28%. Problems with the hardware material were more frequent in the hamstring group, leading to an increased rate of surgical revision. Anterior knee pain was initially higher in the patellar tendon group, but there was no significant difference in a 2-year interval. The rerupture rate was statistically higher in the hamstring group.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0363546519867913DOI Listing
September 2019

Genesis 1 posterior cruciate-retaining total knee arthroplasty with asymmetric tibial tray: An 18-to-26-year long-term clinical outcome study.

Knee 2019 Aug 19;26(4):838-846. Epub 2019 May 19.

Orthopaedic Department, General State Hospital of Volos, Thessalia, Hellenic Republic.

Background: To present the long-term clinical and radiological outcomes of the Genesis I posterior cruciate-retaining total knee arthroplasty (TKA) (Smith & Nephew Orthopaedics, Memphis, TN, USA) (one of the first designed with an asymmetric tibial tray).

Methods: Prospectively collected data from 117 cemented TKAs performed on 95 patients were evaluated using this design, with a mean follow-up of 21.5 years (range, 18-26). Failures, complication rates, and clinical (both subjective and objective) and radiological outcomes were assessed for all patients.

Results: Seven failures occurred (wear and structural failure of the polyethylene insert) and six revision surgeries were performed at a mean of 10 years (range, three to 14) from the index operation. No revision of either the femoral or tibial components for aseptic loosening was performed. Survivorship analysis showed a cumulative success rate of 93.53% (95% CI, 92.75-94.32%) at 20 and 25 years, with revision for any reason as an end point. All patients showed a statistically significant improvement (P = 0.001) in the Knee Society and Oxford knee rating scores.

Conclusions: This study demonstrated satisfactory long-term clinical outcomes for this TKA design, with revisions being related to polyethylene wear structural failure.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.knee.2019.04.014DOI Listing
August 2019

Withdrawn: A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Modular and Nonmodular Neck Versions of a Titanium Stem.

J Arthroplasty 2018 Sep 21. Epub 2018 Sep 21.

Department of Trauma and Orthopaedics, Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen Hospital, Liverpool, United Kingdom.

This article has been withdrawn at the request of the author(s) and/or editor. The Publisher apologizes for any inconvenience this may cause. The full Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal can be found at https://www.elsevier.com/about/our-business/policies/article-withdrawal.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arth.2018.09.039DOI Listing
September 2018

Recurrent posterior knee laxity: diagnosis, technical aspects and treatment algorithm.

Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc 2017 Oct 29;25(10):3046-3052. Epub 2016 Mar 29.

Cabinet Goethe, 23 Avenue Niel, 75017, Paris, France.

Purpose: Aim of this study was to determine the characteristics, clinical and radiological diagnostic methods of PCL isolated and combined knee injuries.

Methods: One hundred and twelve patients with a recurrent posterior knee laxity were surgically treated. Clinical examination, MRI, Telos™ stress dynamic X-rays, KT-1000 measurements and the IKDC questionnaire were used to diagnose and evaluate these injuries.

Results: Median follow-up was 4.5 years (2-11 years). Thirty-two patients (28.6 %) had an isolated posterior laxity, 53 (47.3 %) a posterior posterolateral laxity, 21 (18.7 %) a posterior posteromedial laxity and six (5.4 %) patients had a complex posterior and mediolateral laxity. Road traffic accidents and sports injuries were the main causes of trauma. The mean preoperative value of posterior tibial translation was 13.5 mm (SD 1.4) and the mean postoperative value was 4.4 mm (SD 1.7) as measured with the Telos device. In the cases with a concomitant ACL rupture, the mean preoperative value of anterior tibial translation was 6.5 mm (SD 1.3) and the mean postoperative value was 1.7 mm (SD 0.8). The mean pre- and postoperative IKDC scores were 74.5 (SD 4.2) and 87.9 (SD 3.1), respectively. Meniscal and/or cartilage injuries were found in 80 patients (71.4 %).

Conclusions: Recurrent posterior knee laxity can be restored with the one-stage PCL reconstruction using a quadriceps graft and reconstruction of the posteromedial-posterolateral lesions using the LaPrade techniques. The benefits of this study include enabling surgeons to accurately manage these injuries from a clinical perspective, and treating them with a specific surgical algorithm.

Level Of Evidence: III.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00167-016-4085-2DOI Listing
October 2017

No difference in osteoarthritis after surgical and non-surgical treatment of ACL-injured knees after 10 years.

Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc 2016 Sep 9;24(9):2953-2959. Epub 2015 Apr 9.

, Flat 155F, Block D, The Plaza, Claypit Lane, Leeds, LS2 8BN, UK.

Purpose: Aim of this study was to record and compare the functional and activity level as well as the manifestations of osteoarthritis after isolated ACL ruptures between patients with conservative treatment and ACL reconstruction with hamstrings tendon graft.

Methods: Thirty-two patients diagnosed with ACL rupture were recorded. Clinical examination included the Tegner and Lysholm activity scale, the International Knee Documentation Committee Subjective Form and KT-1000 arthrometer. Narrowing of the medial and lateral joint spaces was assessed using the IKDC knee examination score.

Results: Median follow-up was 10.3 years (range 10-11). Fifteen patients were conservatively treated (median age 33 years, range 25-39). Seventeen patients were operated (median age 31 years, range 20-36). There was significant difference between the mean values of IKDC scores in favour of the ACL-reconstruction group of patients, 86.8 (SD 6.5) versus 77.5 (SD 13.8), respectively (p = 0.04). The mean value of anteroposterior tibial translation was 1.5 mm (SD 0.2) for ACL-reconstruction group of patients, while the corresponding mean value for ACL-conservative group was 4.5 mm (SD 0.5), p = 0.03. Four patients in ACL-reconstruction group had radiological findings of grade C or D according to IKDC form. In ACL-conservative group, five patients presented similar signs (n.s.).

Conclusions: ACL reconstruction using hamstrings autograft resulted in better functional outcome and laxity measurements than ACL-conservative management. However, the incidence of radiological osteoarthritis was similar between the two groups and independent on the pre-operative grade of laxity and functional status of the patients. Equally, bone bruises were not found as a risk factor for the development of osteoarthritis after ACL rupture.

Level Of Evidence: Prospective randomized study, Level II.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00167-015-3593-9DOI Listing
September 2016

The effect of osteoporotic treatment on the functional outcome, re-fracture rate, quality of life and mortality in patients with hip fractures: a prospective functional and clinical outcome study on 520 patients.

Injury 2015 Feb 8;46(2):378-83. Epub 2014 Dec 8.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Thessalia, CERETETH, University General Hospital of Larissa, Mezourlo Region, 41110 Larissa, Greece. Electronic address:

Numerous high quality studies have shown the positive effects of various osteoporotic medical treatment regimens on bone mass and on the reduction of risk for new spinal, hip and non-spinal fractures in osteoporotic patients. However, the effect of osteoporotic treatment on the functional and clinical outcome of patients who have sustained hip fractures and been treated surgically has not yet been addressed. Five hundred and twenty patients out of 611 who were admitted (2009-2011), operated on due to a hip fracture and completed their follow-up evaluations were included in this study. Data related to functional outcome scores, re-fracture rate, quality of life and mortality rate were prospectively recorded, analysed and correlated to osteoporotic medical treatment. There were 151 (25%) men and 369 (71%) women with a mean age of 80.7 years (range, 60 to 90 years). At a mean follow-up of 27.5 months (range, 24 to 36 months) a mortality rate of 23.6% at 2 years was recorded. Mean values of functional and quality of life scores were found to have progressively improved within two years after surgery. Seventy-eight (15%) patients were taking osteoporotic treatment before their hip fracture and 89 (17.1%) started afterwards. Osteoporotic treatment proved to be an important predictor of functional recovery (all p values<0.05), re-fracture rate (p=0.028) and quality of life (EQ-5D, all dimensions, p values<0.05). Osteoporotic treatment did not affect post-fracture mortality rates. Osteoporotic treatment taken before or initiated after fracture is a strong predictor of functional and clinical outcome in patients with hip fractures treated surgically.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.injury.2014.11.031DOI Listing
February 2015

Total hip arthroplasty after acetabular fracture: incidence of complications, reoperation rates and functional outcomes: evidence today.

J Arthroplasty 2014 Oct 12;29(10):1983-90. Epub 2014 Jun 12.

Academic Department of Trauma and Orthopaedics, School of Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds General Infirmary, Clarendon Wing Level A, Leeds, UK.

The outcome of THA following acetabular fracture was analyzed on 654 patients with a systematic review approach. An uncemented acetabular and femoral component was used in 80.1% and 59.8% of the cases respectively. The median Harris hip score was 88 points. In the early THA group, Kaplan-Meier survivorship analysis with any loosening, osteolysis or revision as the end point revealed that the 10-year cup survival was 81% whereas in the late THA group was 76% (P=0.287). The 10-year survival was 95% for the early stems and 85% for the late ones (P=0.001). Due to their complexity these fractures should be managed in highly specializing units where the expertise of arthroplasty and trauma reconstruction is available.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arth.2014.06.001DOI Listing
October 2014

Reconstruction of an extensive soft tissue and bone defect of the first metatarsal with the use of Masquelet technique: a case report.

Foot Ankle Surg 2014 Jun 16;20(2):e19-22. Epub 2013 Dec 16.

Academic Department of Trauma and Orthopaedics, School of Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds General Infirmary, Clarendon Wing Level A, Great George Street, LS1 3EX, Leeds, UK. Electronic address:

Unlabelled: The literature regarding reconstruction of foot bone defects is limited. The purpose of this study is to present a case report with an extensive bone defect of the first metatarsal bone which was treated with the use of the induced membrane technique. A 53-year-old man, with comminuted foot grade IIIb open fracture was treated with the Masquelet procedure. At 14 months follow-up, clinical and radiological assessment of the foot revealed osseous healing and no signs of infection, osteolysis or hardware failure. At 18 months follow-up, the patient had no pain and returned to his usual daily activities. The Masquelet procedure provides an effective method of treatment of extensive bone defects of the foot. It can restore the normal length and metatarsal arch minimizing the risk of complications that occurs with other surgical procedures.

Level Of Evidence: Level V, case report.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fas.2013.11.006DOI Listing
June 2014

Neurovascular anatomic relationships to arthroscopic posterior and transseptal portals in different knee positions.

Am J Sports Med 2013 Jul;41(7):1559-64

Cabinet Goethe, 23 Avenue Niel, 75017 Paris, France.

Background: No study exists that directly measures the distances between posterior portals and the popliteal artery under arthroscopic conditions.

Purpose: To define the anatomic relationship between the neural structures and standard posterior arthroscopic portals and between the popliteal artery and posterior as well as transseptal portals in different knee positions.

Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study.

Methods: Seventeen fresh-frozen cadaveric knees were used. The posterolateral, posteromedial, and transseptal portals were established at 90° of knee flexion. The popliteal artery was revealed using a shaver placed through the posteromedial portal. The distance from those portals to the popliteal artery was measured using a precision caliper. After the measurements were made, each specimen was dissected. The distance from a needle, blade, and cannula in each portal site to the adjacent neural structures was successively measured at 30°, 90°, and 120° of knee flexion.

Results: The mean distance (in millimeters) from the posterolateral, posteromedial, and transseptal portals to the popliteal artery was significantly smaller at 30° (32.1 ± 4.6, 36.5 ± 4.9, and 9.0 ± 3.9, respectively) than at 90° (40.7 ± 5.1, 41.0 ± 3.8, and 18.0 ± 3.8, respectively) and 120° (38.4 ± 4.8, 38.7 ± 6.0, and 21.0 ± 4.0, respectively) of knee flexion. The mean distance from the posterolateral portal to the common peroneal nerve at 90° of flexion (needle, 26.6 ± 9.5; blade, 24.7 ± 6.9; cannula, 22.1 ± 6.9) was significantly greater than the distance at 30° (needle, 23.4 ± 6.5; blade, 21.4 ± 6.4; cannula, 18.4 ± 6.3) and 120° (needle, 21.8 ± 6.6; blade, 19.1 ± 6.3; cannula, 17.4 ± 6.7) of knee flexion. The mean distance between the posteromedial portal and the inferior infrapatellar branch of the saphenous nerve at 30° (needle, 18.6 ± 4.3; blade, 15.5 ± 3.3; cannula, 13.7 ± 5.8) of flexion was smaller than at 90° (needle, 20.1 ± 6.1; blade, 16.5 ± 5.3; cannula, 14.3 ± 4.4) and 120° (needle, 21.1 ± 3.6; blade, 17.7 ± 4.9; cannula, 15.1 ± 5.9) of flexion, but there was no statistical significance. The mean distance from the posteromedial portal to the sartorial branch of the saphenous nerve at 30° (needle, 22.8 ± 6.1; blade, 19.8 ± 5.3; cannula, 17.7 ± 6.2) of flexion was significantly smaller than that at 90° (needle, 29.7 ± 3.6; blade, 26.3 ± 6.3; cannula, 23.1 ± 4.7) and 120° (needle, 31.5 ± 3.9; blade, 28.9 ± 4.1; cannula, 25.4 ± 5.1) of flexion. Conclusion/

Clinical Relevance: The position of 90° of knee flexion is safe to establish posterior and transseptal arthroscopic portals. The position of 120° of knee flexion is practically safe to establish posteromedial and transseptal portals, but it is unsafe to create a posterolateral portal because the risk of damaging the common peroneal nerve is high. The position of 30° of knee flexion is not recommended to establish posterior arthroscopic portals.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0363546513492704DOI Listing
July 2013

An anterior ankle arthroscopic technique for retrograde osteochondral autograft transplantation of posteromedial and central talar dome cartilage defects.

Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc 2014 Jun 12;22(6):1298-303. Epub 2013 Apr 12.

Centre Hospitalier de Versailles, Université Versailles Saint-Quentin, 177, rue de, Versailles, 78157 Le Chesnay and Ecole de Chirurgie du Fer à Moulin, AP-HP, Paris, France,

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to present an arthroscopic technique for the treatment for posteromedial and central cartilage defects of the talus using anterior arthroscopic portals and without performing a medial malleolar osteotomy.

Methods: Nine fresh cadavers were dissected. Autografts were implanted under arthroscopy using a retrograde osteochondral transplantation system, and their position was estimated using specific angular calibrators and later confirmed by software analysis of two photographs of the disarticulated ankle joint.

Results: In eight cases, the congruence between the surrounding articular cartilage and the cartilage of the graft was high, with differences measuring <1 mm. There were no iatrogenic cartilage lesions of the tibial plafond and no fractures of the talus. All the autografts remained stable during full range of motion cycles of the ankle joint. One failure was reported.

Conclusion: This cadaveric study showed that the retrograde osteochondral autograft transplantation technique in the talus is feasible. It can be used to restore the posteromedial and central talar articular surfaces using conventional ankle arthroscopic instrumentation and anterior arthroscopic portals without resorting to a medial malleolar osteotomy. Further clinical and biomechanical studies are required to prove the efficacy of this technique and its reproducibility in routine clinical practice.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00167-013-2502-3DOI Listing
June 2014

Arthroscopic retrograde osteochondral autograft transplantation for cartilage lesions of the tibial plateau: a prospective study.

Am J Sports Med 2013 Feb 13;41(2):411-5. Epub 2012 Dec 13.

Cabinet Goethe, 23 Avenue Niel, 75017 Paris, France.

Background: There are only 2 reported cases of arthroscopic retrograde osteochondral autograft transplantations regarding tibial plateau cartilage defects.

Purpose: To present a detailed description of arthroscopic retrograde osteochondral autograft transplantation of the tibial plateau as well as to provide its advantages and disadvantages in comparison with other techniques.

Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4.

Methods: Four patients (3 men and 1 woman; mean age, 31.2 years) suffering from tibial plateau cartilage lesions underwent surgery. In each case, the lesions were caused by sports injuries. There were 3 lateral and 1 medial tibial plateau defects. The International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score and Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) were recorded preoperatively and postoperatively. Radiological assessment was made by plain radiographs, CT arthroscans, and MRI.

Results: The mean follow-up was 55 months (range, 52-60). The mean preoperative IKDC score was 53.5 (range, 37-66), while the mean postoperative IKDC score at final follow-up was 95.4 (range, 93.1-97.7). Regarding the KOOS calculation, there was significant improvement concerning each parameter after surgery. All patients were satisfied with the surgical procedure and returned to their previous activity level. Postoperative imaging showed very good adaptation and incorporation of the osteochondral autografts.

Conclusion: Treatment of tibial plateau cartilage defects with arthroscopic retrograde osteochondral autograft transplantation could be performed on a routine basis in clinical practice. The results were encouraging and showed good incorporation of the graft, a minimal failure rate, and satisfactory functional outcomes of patients.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0363546512469091DOI Listing
February 2013

Reconstruction of iliac crest with bovine cancellous allograft after bone graft harvest for symphysis pubis arthrodesis.

Int Orthop 2012 Aug 22;36(8):1701-7. Epub 2012 May 22.

Academic Department of Trauma and Orthopaedics, School of Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds General Infirmary, Clarendon Wing Level A, Great George Street, LS1 3EX, Leeds, West Yorkshire, UK.

Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficiency, as well as the incorporation characteristics of a specific type of xenograft used for iliac crest defects post-harvesting tri-cortical iliac crest bone graft.

Methods: Sixteen patients diagnosed with chronic anterior pelvic pain were operated for pubic symphysis fusion. The tri-cortical graft harvested from the iliac crest was inserted into the pubic symphysis and compressed with a reconstruction plate. The defect in the iliac crest was filled with a block of cancellous bovine substitute (Tutobone®). The length of iliac crest defect, time to fusion of pubic symphysis, time to incorporation of the graft and complications were recorded. The postoperative pain and patients' satisfaction were evaluated.

Results: The median age of patients was 36.5 years (range 27-75). Fusion was obtained in 15 patients (94 %). The median time to fusion was four months (range three to seven). The length of the iliac crest bone defect ranged from 40 to 70 mm. Integration of the bovine substitute was achieved in 15 patients (94 %) over a median period of three months (range two to six). The postoperative median pain score was 2 (range 1-5). Twelve patients (75 %) reported good satisfaction. No major complications or allergic reactions were observed.

Conclusions: The xenograft used in this study provided a safe and effective method of reconstruction of iliac crest donor site defects. It has satisfactory incorporation, high biocompatibility and no signs of inflammatory reactions. This new technique is simple and easily reproducible in routine clinical practice.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00264-012-1572-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3535019PMC
August 2012

Arthroscopic treatment of localized pigmented villonodular synovitis of the knee.

Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc 2012 Aug 12;20(8):1550-3. Epub 2011 Nov 12.

Cabinet Goethe, 23 Avenue Niel, 75017, Paris, France.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to review the outcome of the arthroscopic treatment of localized pigmented villonodular synovitis of the knee and to determine the recurrence rate with clinical and magnetic resonance imaging evaluation at midterm follow-up.

Methods: Thirty consecutive patients diagnosed with localized pigmented villonodular synovitis of the knee were treated arthroscopically between 1990 and 2008. Clinical assessment was made with the use of Lysholm Knee Scale, and radiologic assessment was done by plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging of the knee. Recurrence rate of the disease was also estimated.

Results: The average follow-up was 75 months (range 12-144). The median age of the patients was 46 years (range 23-71). Symptoms were discomfort of the knee (100%), swelling (90%), locking (50%), pain (10%) and palpable mass (15%). A history of knee trauma was present in 10% of the patients. The nodules were localized in the gutters (45%), suprapatellar pouch (26%), patellar fat pad (13%), posterior compartment of the knee (13%) and in the femoral notch (9%). The median Lysholm Knee Score was 56.5 (range 53-60) and 85.5 (83-88) preoperatively and at final follow-up, respectively. No postoperative complications occurred.

Conclusions: Arthroscopy is a safe and effective procedure for the treatment of localized pigmented villonodular synovitis of the knee. Magnetic resonance imaging is essential to diagnose this pathologic condition and to define accurately its localization and treatment strategy.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00167-011-1747-yDOI Listing
August 2012

Arthroscopic treatment of a talar neck fracture: a case report.

Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc 2012 Sep 3;20(9):1850-3. Epub 2011 Nov 3.

Centre Hospitalier de Versailles-Université Versailles Saint-Quentin, 177, rue de Versailles, 78157 Le Chesnay, France.

Unlabelled: Talar neck fractures are severe injuries, and their complications can lead to significant functional disability. Open reduction and internal fixation still constitute the treatment of choice. We report a case of a patient with a Hawkins type III talar neck fracture who was treated successfully with the use of an entirely arthroscopic technique. Four arthroscopic portals were used to control fracture reduction and fixation, which was made by two cannulated screws. There were no complications, and the patient returned uneventfully to her previous daily activities.

Level Of Evidence: Therapeutic study, Case report with no comparison group, Level IV.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00167-011-1742-3DOI Listing
September 2012

Fixation of posterior cruciate ligament avulsion fracture with the use of a suspensory fixation.

Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc 2012 May 19;20(5):996-9. Epub 2011 Oct 19.

Cabinet Goethe, 23 Avenue Niel, 75017, Paris, France.

Purpose: Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) avulsion fractures are uncommon injuries, and their treatment, still, remains difficult. There are procedures described in the literature which are minimal invasive and use either sutures or screws to stabilize the avulsed fragment. The purpose of this study was to present an innovative arthroscopic technique using a suspensory device with specific biomechanical properties. The aim of this study was to determine whether this technique was effective in the treatment of PCL avulsion fractures and applicable in everyday clinical practice.

Methods: Two patients with an isolated posterior cruciate ligament avulsion fracture were operated under arthroscopy. The Endobutton device was used to stabilize the fracture, and a double-spike plate was used to secure the fixation. The clinical assessment of patients was made by plain radiographs, CT scan, MRI and IKDC examination form.

Results: The median operative time was 57.5 min (range 55-60). No posterior tibial sag was noticed, and the range of motion was normal. No complications were recorded, and both patients returned to their usual daily activities. Both fractures had healed at 10 months postoperatively.

Conclusions: Treatment outcomes using a suspensory device in the fixation of posterior cruciate ligament avulsion fractures are encouraging. The small size of the device makes it easy to handle, and the procedure is simple and does not require multiple sutures and bony tunnels. This technique offers sufficient compression, restores the length of posterior cruciate ligament and can fix avulsion fragments of any size.

Level Of Evidence: Therapeutic study, Case series with no comparison group, Level IV.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00167-011-1702-yDOI Listing
May 2012

Comparing two intramedullary devices for treating trochanteric fractures: a prospective study.

J Orthop Surg Res 2010 Feb 18;5. Epub 2010 Feb 18.

Orthopaedic Surgeon, Resident, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, General Hospital of Volos, Polimeri 134, 38222 Greece.

Background: Intertrochanteric fractures are surgically treated by using different methods and implants. The optional type of surgical stabilization is still under debate. However, between devices with the same philosophy, different design characteristics may substantially influence fracture healing. This is a prospective study comparing the complication and final functional outcome of two intramedullary devices, the intramedullary hip screw (IMHS) and the ENDOVIS nail.

Materials And Methods: Two hundred fifteen patients were randomized on admission in two treatment groups. Epidemiology features and functional status was similar between two treatment groups. Fracture stability was assessed according to the Evan's classification. One hundred ten patients were treated with IMHS and 105 with ENDOVIS nail.

Results: There were no significant statistical differences between the two groups regarding blood loss, transfusion requirements and mortality rate. In contrast, the number of total complications was significantly higher in the ENDOVIS nail group. Moreover, the overall functional and walking competence was superior in the patients treated with the IMHS nail.

Conclusions: These results indicate that the choice of the proper implant plays probably an important role in the final outcome of surgical treatment of intertrochanteric fractures. IMHS nail allows for accurate surgical technique, for both static and dynamic compression and high rotational stability. IMHS nail proved more reliable in our study regarding nail insertion and overall uncomplicated outcome.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1749-799X-5-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2831869PMC
February 2010
-->