Publications by authors named "Komwit Surachat"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Characterization and Analysis of Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs) in Pandemic and Non-Pandemic Isolates from Seafood Sources.

Microorganisms 2021 Jun 4;9(6). Epub 2021 Jun 4.

Division of Biological Science, Faculty of Science, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai 90110, Songkla, Thailand.

is one of the significant seafood-borne pathogens causing gastroenteritis in humans. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) are commonly detected in the genomes of and the polymorphism of CRISPR patterns has been applied as a genetic marker for tracking its evolution. In this work, a total of 15 pandemic and 36 non-pandemic isolates obtained from seafood between 2000 and 2012 were characterized based on hemolytic activity, antimicrobial susceptibility, and CRISPR elements. The results showed that 15/17 of the seafood isolates carrying the thermostable direct hemolysin gene (+) were Kanagawa phenomenon (KP) positive. The Multiple Antibiotic Resistance (MAR) index ranged between 0.1 and 0.4, and 45% of the isolates have an MAR index ≥ 0.2. A total of 19 isolates were positive for CRISPR detection, including all + - isolates, two of - +, and each of + + and - -. Four spacer types (Sp1 to Sp4) were identified, and CRISPR-positive isolates had at least one type of spacer homolog to the region of megaplasmid. It is of interest that a specific CRISPR profile and spacer sequence type was observed with correlations to the hemolysin genotype (). Thus, these provide essential data on the exposure of foreign genetic elements and indicate shared ancestry within different genotypes of isolates.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9061220DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8226915PMC
June 2021

Fecal microbiome alterations in pediatric patients with short bowel syndrome receiving a rotating cycle of gastrointestinal prophylactic antibiotics.

Pediatr Surg Int 2021 Jun 22. Epub 2021 Jun 22.

Translational Medicine Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, 90110, Songkhla, Thailand.

Background: Pediatric patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS) are at risk of developing small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). Prevention of SIBO using cyclic enteric antibiotics has been implemented to control the balance in microbial ecosystems, although its effectiveness has not been well studied.

Purpose: This study aimed to explore the change in the gut microbial composition in SBS patients during cyclic antibiotic phases and antibiotic-free period, and to compare the microbiota composition between healthy controls and SBS patients.

Method: SBS patients taking oral metronidazole alternating with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMT) and antibiotic-free conditions as a '10-day cyclic protocol' were involved in fecal microbiome study using Illumina 16S sequencing.

Results: When healthy control possessed the majority of Bacteroidetes spp. (54%) and Firmicutes spp. (33%), the microbial composition in SBS patients especially Firmicutes spp. and Proteobacteria spp. was prominently changed in each phase of treatment. In antibiotic-free period, SBS patients displayed 49% Firmicutes and 36% Proteobacteria. However, higher Proteobacteria than Firmicutes were detected at the commencement of metronidazole (58% versus 33%). Similarly, 56% Proteobacteria and 27% Firmicutes were found during TMP-SMT. Escherichia coli increased prominently during the antibiotic periods.

Conclusion: Prophylactic antibiotics change the gut microbiota composition in an unfavorable direction, especially when repeatedly used for a long period. This practice should be reconsidered.

Level Of Evidence: III.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00383-021-04948-5DOI Listing
June 2021

influences quorum sensing-controlled phenotypes of acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease-causing .

PeerJ 2021 1;9:e11567. Epub 2021 Jun 1.

Division of Biological Science, Faculty of Science, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla, Thailand.

Background: Acute hepatopancreatic necrosis syndrome (AHPND) caused by strain (VP) impacts the shrimp industry worldwide. With the increasing problem of antibiotic abuse, studies on quorum sensing (QS) system and anti-QS compounds bring potential breakthroughs for disease prevention and treatment.

Methods: In this study, the cell-free culture supernatant (CFCS) and its extract of BC25 were investigated for anti-QS activity against a reporter bacteria, DMST46846. The effects of CFCS and/ or extract on motility, biofilm formation and extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) of VP PSU5591 were evaluated. Moreover, the effects of BC25 on virulence of VP PSU5591 were investigated by shrimp challenge test. The potentially active anti-QS compounds presented in the extract and effect on gene expression of VP PSU5591 were identified.

Results: The CFCS of BC25 and its extract showed a significant anti-QS activity against the reporter bacteria as well as swimming and swarming motilities, biofilms, and EPSs production by VP PSU5591. Transcriptome analysis revealed that BC25 extract significantly reduced the flagella genes involved in biofilm formation and iron-controlled virulence regulatory gene of VP PSU5591. Whereas, the LuxR family transcriptional regulator gene, c-factor, a cell-cell signaling gene, and capsular polysaccharide were up-regulated. The potentially active anti-QS compounds identified in extract were Cyclo-(L-Leu-L-Pro), and Cyclo-(L-Phe-L-Pro). Furthermore, BC25 enhanced disease resistance against VP PSU5591 in tested shrimp larvae.

Conclusion: These findings suggest that BC25 could provide natural anti-QS and anti-biofilms compounds and has great ability to be used as biocontrol agent against VP infection in shrimp aquaculture.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7717/peerj.11567DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8176930PMC
June 2021

A Novel Jumbo Phage PhiMa05 Inhibits Harmful sp.

Front Microbiol 2021 20;12:660351. Epub 2021 Apr 20.

Division of Biological Science, Faculty of Science, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Thailand.

poses a concern because of its potential contribution to eutrophication and production of microcystins (MCs). Phage treatment has been proposed as a novel biocontrol method for . Here, we isolated a lytic cyanophage named PhiMa05 with high efficiency against MCs-producing strains. Its burst size was large, with approximately 127 phage particles/infected cell, a short latent period (1 day), and high stability to broad salinity, pH and temperature ranges. The PhiMa05 structure was composed of an icosahedral capsid (100 nm) and tail (120 nm), suggesting that the PhiMa05 belongs to the family. PhiMa05 inhibited both planktonic and aggregated forms of in a concentration-dependent manner. The lysis of resulted in a significant reduction of total MCs compared to the uninfected cells. A genome analysis revealed that PhiMa05 is a double-stranded DNA virus with a 273,876 bp genome, considered a jumbo phage. Out of 254 predicted open reading frames (ORFs), only 54 ORFs were assigned as putative functional proteins. These putative proteins are associated with DNA metabolisms, structural proteins, host lysis and auxiliary metabolic genes (AMGs), while no lysogenic, toxin and antibiotic resistance genes were observed in the genome. The AMGs harbored in the phage genome are known to be involved in energy metabolism [photosynthesis and tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA)] and nucleotide biosynthesis genes. Their functions suggested boosting and redirecting host metabolism during viral infection. Comparative genome analysis with other phages in the database indicated that PhiMa05 is unique. Our study highlights the characteristics and genome analysis of a novel jumbo phage, PhiMa05. PhiMa05 is a potential phage for controlling bloom and minimizing MC occurrence.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2021.660351DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8093824PMC
April 2021

Induction and Genome Analysis of HY01, a Newly Reported Prophage from an Emerging Shrimp Pathogen .

Microorganisms 2021 Feb 15;9(2). Epub 2021 Feb 15.

Division of Biological Science, Faculty of Science, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla 90110, Thailand.

is an emerging aquaculture pathogen that causes luminous vibriosis in farmed shrimp. Although prophages in various aquaculture pathogens have been widely reported, there is still limited knowledge regarding prophages in the genome of pathogenic . Here, we describe the full-genome sequence of a prophage named HY01, induced from the emerging shrimp pathogen HY01. The phage HY01 was induced by mitomycin C and was morphologically characterized as long tailed phage. phage HY01 is composed of 41,772 bp of dsDNA with a G+C content of 47.45%. A total of 60 open reading frames (ORFs) were identified, of which 31 could be predicted for their biological functions. Twenty seven out of 31 predicted protein coding regions were matched with several encoded proteins of various , , , and other phages of Gram-negative bacteria. Interestingly, the comparative genome analysis revealed that the phage HY01 was only distantly related to Vibrio phage Va_PF430-3_p42 of fish pathogen but differed in genomic size and gene organization. The phylogenetic tree placed the phage together with family. Additionally, a survey of Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) spacers revealed two matching sequences between phage HY01 genome and viral spacer sequence of spp. The spacer results combined with the synteny results suggest that the evolution of phage HY01 is driven by the horizontal genetic exchange between bacterial families belonging to the class of Gammaproteobacteria.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9020400DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7919010PMC
February 2021

Genomic Insight into HN9, a Potential Probiotic Strain Isolated from the Traditional Thai-Style Fermented Beef Nhang.

Microorganisms 2020 Dec 27;9(1). Epub 2020 Dec 27.

Division of Biological Science, Faculty of Science, Prince of Songkla University, Hatyai, Songkhla 90110, Thailand.

HN9 is a beneficial lactic acid bacterium isolated from Nhang, a traditional Thai-style fermented beef. In this study, the molecular properties of HN9 were characterized to provide insights into its potential probiotic activity. Specifically, this work sought to report the complete genome of HN9 and perform a comparative genome analysis with other bacterial strains belonging to the genus . Genomic features of HN9 were compared with those of all other bacterial strains to examine the adaptation, evolutionary relationships, and diversity within this genus. Additionally, several bioinformatic approaches were used to investigate phylogenetic relationships, genome stability, virulence factors, bacteriocin production, and antimicrobial resistance genes of the HN9 strain, as well as to ensure its safety as a potential starter culture in food applications. A 2,034,522 bp circular chromosome and two circular plasmids, designated pHN9-1 (42,239-bp) and pHN9-2 (30,711-bp), were detected, and used for pan-genome analysis, as well as for identification of bacteriocin-encoding genes in 129 strains belonging to all species. Two CRISPR regions were identified in HN9, including type II-A CRISPR/CRISPR-associated (Cas). This study provides an in-depth analysis on HN9, facilitating a better understanding of its adaptability to different environments and its mechanism to maintain genome stability over time.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9010050DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7823806PMC
December 2020

Geno-Spatial Distribution of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis and Drug Resistance Profiles in Myanmar-Thai Border Area.

Trop Med Infect Dis 2020 Sep 30;5(4). Epub 2020 Sep 30.

Epidemiology Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla 90110, Thailand.

Worldwide, studies investigating the relationship between the lineage of (MTB) across geographic areas has empowered the "End TB" program and understand transmission across national boundaries. Genomic diversity of MTB varies with geographical locations and ethnicity. Genomic diversity can also affect the emergence of drug resistance. In Myanmar, we still have limited genetic information about geographical, ethnicity, and drug resistance linkage to MTB genetic information. This study aimed to describe the geno-spatial distribution of MTB and drug resistance profiles in Myanmar-Thailand border areas. A cross-sectional study was conducted with a total of 109 sequenced isolates. The lineages of MTB and the potential associated socio-demographic, geographic and clinical factors were analyzed using Fisher's exact tests. value of statistically significance was set at < 0.05. We found that 67% of the isolates were lineage 1 (L1)/East-African-Indian (EAI) (n = 73), followed by lineage 2 (L2)/Beijing (n = 26), lineage 4 (L4)/European American (n = 6) and lineage 3 (L3)/Delhi/Central Asian (n = 4). "Gender", "type of TB patient", "sputum smear grading" and "streptomycin resistance" were significantly different with the lineages of MTB. Sublineages of L1, which had never been reported elsewhere in Myanmar, were detected in this study area. Moreover, both ethnicity and lineage of MTB significantly differed in distribution by patient location. Diversity of the lineage of MTB and detection of new sublineages suggested that this small area had been resided by a heterogeneous population group who actively transmitted the disease. This information on distribution of lineage of MTB can be linked in the future with those on the other side of the border to evaluate cross-border transmission.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/tropicalmed5040153DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7709706PMC
September 2020

In silico analysis of protein toxin and bacteriocins from Lactobacillus paracasei SD1 genome and available online databases.

PLoS One 2017 24;12(8):e0183548. Epub 2017 Aug 24.

Department of Molecular Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, Faculty of Science, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla 90112, Thailand.

Lactobacillus paracasei SD1 is a potential probiotic strain due to its ability to survive several conditions in human dental cavities. To ascertain its safety for human use, we therefore performed a comprehensive bioinformatics analysis and characterization of the bacterial protein toxins produced by this strain. We report the complete genome of Lactobacillus paracasei SD1 and its comparison to other Lactobacillus genomes. Additionally, we identify and analyze its protein toxins and antimicrobial proteins using reliable online database resources and establish its phylogenetic relationship with other bacterial genomes. Our investigation suggests that this strain is safe for human use and contains several bacteriocins that confer health benefits to the host. An in silico analysis of protein-protein interactions between the target bacteriocins and the microbial proteins gtfB and luxS of Streptococcus mutans was performed and is discussed here.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0183548PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5570283PMC
October 2017