Publications by authors named "Klaus Giewekemeyer"

13 Publications

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Segmented flow generator for serial crystallography at the European X-ray free electron laser.

Nat Commun 2020 09 9;11(1):4511. Epub 2020 Sep 9.

School of Molecular Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, 85287-1604, USA.

Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) with X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) allows structure determination of membrane proteins and time-resolved crystallography. Common liquid sample delivery continuously jets the protein crystal suspension into the path of the XFEL, wasting a vast amount of sample due to the pulsed nature of all current XFEL sources. The European XFEL (EuXFEL) delivers femtosecond (fs) X-ray pulses in trains spaced 100 ms apart whereas pulses within trains are currently separated by 889 ns. Therefore, continuous sample delivery via fast jets wastes >99% of sample. Here, we introduce a microfluidic device delivering crystal laden droplets segmented with an immiscible oil reducing sample waste and demonstrate droplet injection at the EuXFEL compatible with high pressure liquid delivery of an SFX experiment. While achieving ~60% reduction in sample waste, we determine the structure of the enzyme 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonate-8-phosphate synthase from microcrystals delivered in droplets revealing distinct structural features not previously reported.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-18156-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7481229PMC
September 2020

Evaluation of serial crystallographic structure determination within megahertz pulse trains.

Struct Dyn 2019 Nov 4;6(6):064702. Epub 2019 Dec 4.

Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg, Germany.

The new European X-ray Free-Electron Laser (European XFEL) is the first X-ray free-electron laser capable of delivering intense X-ray pulses with a megahertz interpulse spacing in a wavelength range suitable for atomic resolution structure determination. An outstanding but crucial question is whether the use of a pulse repetition rate nearly four orders of magnitude higher than previously possible results in unwanted structural changes due to either radiation damage or systematic effects on data quality. Here, separate structures from the first and subsequent pulses in the European XFEL pulse train were determined, showing that there is essentially no difference between structures determined from different pulses under currently available operating conditions at the European XFEL.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5124387DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6892710PMC
November 2019

The Single Particles, Clusters and Biomolecules and Serial Femtosecond Crystallography instrument of the European XFEL: initial installation.

J Synchrotron Radiat 2019 May 12;26(Pt 3):660-676. Epub 2019 Apr 12.

European XFEL, Holzkoppel 4, 22869 Schenefeld, Germany.

The European X-ray Free-Electron Laser (FEL) became the first operational high-repetition-rate hard X-ray FEL with first lasing in May 2017. Biological structure determination has already benefitted from the unique properties and capabilities of X-ray FELs, predominantly through the development and application of serial crystallography. The possibility of now performing such experiments at data rates more than an order of magnitude greater than previous X-ray FELs enables not only a higher rate of discovery but also new classes of experiments previously not feasible at lower data rates. One example is time-resolved experiments requiring a higher number of time steps for interpretation, or structure determination from samples with low hit rates in conventional X-ray FEL serial crystallography. Following first lasing at the European XFEL, initial commissioning and operation occurred at two scientific instruments, one of which is the Single Particles, Clusters and Biomolecules and Serial Femtosecond Crystallography (SPB/SFX) instrument. This instrument provides a photon energy range, focal spot sizes and diagnostic tools necessary for structure determination of biological specimens. The instrumentation explicitly addresses serial crystallography and the developing single particle imaging method as well as other forward-scattering and diffraction techniques. This paper describes the major science cases of SPB/SFX and its initial instrumentation - in particular its optical systems, available sample delivery methods, 2D detectors, supporting optical laser systems and key diagnostic components. The present capabilities of the instrument will be reviewed and a brief outlook of its future capabilities is also described.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1107/S1600577519003308DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6510195PMC
May 2019

Initial observations of the femtosecond timing jitter at the European XFEL.

Opt Lett 2019 Apr;44(7):1650-1653

Intense, ultrashort, and high-repetition-rate X-ray pulses, combined with a femtosecond optical laser, allow pump-probe experiments with fast data acquisition and femtosecond time resolution. However, the relative timing of the X-ray pulses and the optical laser pulses can be controlled only to a level of the intrinsic error of the instrument which, without characterization, limits the time resolution of experiments. This limitation inevitably calls for a precise determination of the relative arrival time, which can be used after measurement for sorting and tagging the experimental data to a much finer resolution than it can be controlled to. The observed root-mean-square timing jitter between the X-ray and the optical laser at the SPB/SFX instrument at European XFEL was 308 fs. This first measurement of timing jitter at the European XFEL provides an important step in realizing ultrafast experiments at this novel X-ray source. A method for determining the change in the complex refractive index of samples is also presented.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OL.44.001650DOI Listing
April 2019

Megahertz serial crystallography.

Authors:
Max O Wiedorn Dominik Oberthür Richard Bean Robin Schubert Nadine Werner Brian Abbey Martin Aepfelbacher Luigi Adriano Aschkan Allahgholi Nasser Al-Qudami Jakob Andreasson Steve Aplin Salah Awel Kartik Ayyer Saša Bajt Imrich Barák Sadia Bari Johan Bielecki Sabine Botha Djelloul Boukhelef Wolfgang Brehm Sandor Brockhauser Igor Cheviakov Matthew A Coleman Francisco Cruz-Mazo Cyril Danilevski Connie Darmanin R Bruce Doak Martin Domaracky Katerina Dörner Yang Du Hans Fangohr Holger Fleckenstein Matthias Frank Petra Fromme Alfonso M Gañán-Calvo Yaroslav Gevorkov Klaus Giewekemeyer Helen Mary Ginn Heinz Graafsma Rita Graceffa Dominic Greiffenberg Lars Gumprecht Peter Göttlicher Janos Hajdu Steffen Hauf Michael Heymann Susannah Holmes Daniel A Horke Mark S Hunter Siegfried Imlau Alexander Kaukher Yoonhee Kim Alexander Klyuev Juraj Knoška Bostjan Kobe Manuela Kuhn Christopher Kupitz Jochen Küpper Janine Mia Lahey-Rudolph Torsten Laurus Karoline Le Cong Romain Letrun P Lourdu Xavier Luis Maia Filipe R N C Maia Valerio Mariani Marc Messerschmidt Markus Metz Davide Mezza Thomas Michelat Grant Mills Diana C F Monteiro Andrew Morgan Kerstin Mühlig Anna Munke Astrid Münnich Julia Nette Keith A Nugent Theresa Nuguid Allen M Orville Suraj Pandey Gisel Pena Pablo Villanueva-Perez Jennifer Poehlsen Gianpietro Previtali Lars Redecke Winnie Maria Riekehr Holger Rohde Adam Round Tatiana Safenreiter Iosifina Sarrou Tokushi Sato Marius Schmidt Bernd Schmitt Robert Schönherr Joachim Schulz Jonas A Sellberg M Marvin Seibert Carolin Seuring Megan L Shelby Robert L Shoeman Marcin Sikorski Alessandro Silenzi Claudiu A Stan Xintian Shi Stephan Stern Jola Sztuk-Dambietz Janusz Szuba Aleksandra Tolstikova Martin Trebbin Ulrich Trunk Patrik Vagovic Thomas Ve Britta Weinhausen Thomas A White Krzysztof Wrona Chen Xu Oleksandr Yefanov Nadia Zatsepin Jiaguo Zhang Markus Perbandt Adrian P Mancuso Christian Betzel Henry Chapman Anton Barty

Nat Commun 2018 10 2;9(1):4025. Epub 2018 Oct 2.

Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607, Hamburg, Germany.

The new European X-ray Free-Electron Laser is the first X-ray free-electron laser capable of delivering X-ray pulses with a megahertz inter-pulse spacing, more than four orders of magnitude higher than previously possible. However, to date, it has been unclear whether it would indeed be possible to measure high-quality diffraction data at megahertz pulse repetition rates. Here, we show that high-quality structures can indeed be obtained using currently available operating conditions at the European XFEL. We present two complete data sets, one from the well-known model system lysozyme and the other from a so far unknown complex of a β-lactamase from K. pneumoniae involved in antibiotic resistance. This result opens up megahertz serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) as a tool for reliable structure determination, substrate screening and the efficient measurement of the evolution and dynamics of molecular structures using megahertz repetition rate pulses available at this new class of X-ray laser source.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-018-06156-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6168542PMC
October 2018

Single-shot determination of focused FEL wave fields using iterative phase retrieval.

Opt Express 2017 Jul;25(15):17892-17903

Determining fluctuations in focus properties is essential for many experiments at Self-Amplified-Spontaneous-Emission (SASE) based Free-Electron-Lasers (FELs), in particular for imaging single non-crystalline biological particles. We report on a diffractive imaging technique to fully characterize highly focused, single-shot pulses using an iterative phase retrieval algorithm, and benchmark it against an existing Hartmann wavefront sensor. The results, both theoretical and experimental, demonstrate the effectiveness of this technique to provide a comprehensive and convenient shot-to-shot measurement of focused-pulse wave fields and source-point positional variations without the need for manipulative optics between the focus and the detector.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.25.017892DOI Listing
July 2017

High-dynamic-range coherent diffractive imaging: ptychography using the mixed-mode pixel array detector.

J Synchrotron Radiat 2014 Sep 7;21(Pt 5):1167-74. Epub 2014 Aug 7.

European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg, Germany.

Coherent (X-ray) diffractive imaging (CDI) is an increasingly popular form of X-ray microscopy, mainly due to its potential to produce high-resolution images and the lack of an objective lens between the sample and its corresponding imaging detector. One challenge, however, is that very high dynamic range diffraction data must be collected to produce both quantitative and high-resolution images. In this work, hard X-ray ptychographic coherent diffractive imaging has been performed at the P10 beamline of the PETRA III synchrotron to demonstrate the potential of a very wide dynamic range imaging X-ray detector (the Mixed-Mode Pixel Array Detector, or MM-PAD). The detector is capable of single photon detection, detecting fluxes exceeding 1 × 10(8) 8-keV photons pixel(-1) s(-1), and framing at 1 kHz. A ptychographic reconstruction was performed using a peak focal intensity on the order of 1 × 10(10) photons µm(-2) s(-1) within an area of approximately 325 nm × 603 nm. This was done without need of a beam stop and with a very modest attenuation, while `still' images of the empty beam far-field intensity were recorded without any attenuation. The treatment of the detector frames and CDI methodology for reconstruction of non-sensitive detector regions, partially also extending the active detector area, are described.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1107/S1600577514013411DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4151683PMC
September 2014

Versatility of a hard X-ray Kirkpatrick-Baez focus characterized by ptychography.

J Synchrotron Radiat 2013 May 4;20(Pt 3):490-7. Epub 2013 Apr 4.

Institut für Röntgenphysik, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany.

In the past decade Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirrors have been established as powerful focusing systems in hard X-ray microscopy applications. Here a ptychographic characterization of the KB focus in the dedicated nano-imaging setup GINIX (Göttingen Instrument for Nano-Imaging with X-rays) at the P10 coherence beamline of the PETRA III synchrotron at HASLYLAB/DESY, Germany, is reported. More specifically, it is shown how aberrations in the KB beam, caused by imperfections in the height profile of the focusing mirrors, can be eliminated using a pinhole as a spatial filter near the focal plane. A combination of different pinhole sizes and illumination conditions of the KB setup makes the prepared optical setup well suited not only for high-resolution ptychographic coherent X-ray diffractive imaging but also for moderate-resolution/large-field-of-view propagation imaging in the divergent KB beam.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1107/S0909049513005372DOI Listing
May 2013

Drift correction in ptychographic diffractive imaging.

Ultramicroscopy 2013 Mar 23;126:44-7. Epub 2012 Nov 23.

Applied Physical Chemistry, Ruprecht-Karls-University Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 253, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany.

X-ray ptychography is a rapidly developing phase retrieval technique that combines the experimental advantages of coherent diffractive imaging with the possibility to image extended specimens. Data collection requires imaging at several scan points with high positional accuracy, which implies susceptibility to mechanical drift. This is a well-known problem in ptychographic scans, which can reduce reconstruction quality and limit the achievable resolution. Using a simple model for positional drift, we show that a set of corrected positions can be found systematically, leading to strong improvements in the reconstruction of a Siemens star dataset severely affected by drift.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ultramic.2012.11.006DOI Listing
March 2013

Chemical contrast in soft x-ray ptychography.

Phys Rev Lett 2011 Nov 8;107(20):208101. Epub 2011 Nov 8.

Applied Physical Chemistry, Ruprecht-Karls-University Heidelberg, Germany.

The unique strengths of x-ray microscopy are high penetration depth and near-edge resonances that provide chemical information. We use ptychography, a coherent diffractive imaging technique that disposes of the requirement for isolated specimens, and demonstrate resonant imaging by exploiting resonances near the oxygen K edge to differentiate between two oxygen-containing materials. To highlight a biological system where resonant ptychography might be used for chemical mapping of unsliced cells, reconstructions of freeze-dried Deinococcus radiodurans cells at an energy of 517 eV are shown.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.107.208101DOI Listing
November 2011

Quantitative biological imaging by ptychographic x-ray diffraction microscopy.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2010 Jan 17;107(2):529-34. Epub 2009 Dec 17.

Institut für Röntgenphysik, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen, Germany.

Recent advances in coherent x-ray diffractive imaging have paved the way to reliable and quantitative imaging of noncompact specimens at the nanometer scale. Introduced a year ago, an advanced implementation of ptychographic coherent diffractive imaging has removed much of the previous limitations regarding sample preparation and illumination conditions. Here, we apply this recent approach toward structure determination at the nanoscale to biological microscopy. We show that the projected electron density of unstained and unsliced freeze-dried cells of the bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans can be derived from the reconstructed phase in a straightforward and reproducible way, with quantified and small errors. Thus, the approach may contribute in the future to the understanding of the highly disputed nucleoid structure of bacterial cells. In the present study, the estimated resolution for the cells was 85 nm (half-period length), whereas 50-nm resolution was demonstrated for lithographic test structures. With respect to the diameter of the pinhole used to illuminate the samples, a superresolution of about 15 was achieved for the cells and 30 for the test structures, respectively. These values should be assessed in view of the low dose applied on the order of approximately 1.3x10(5) Gy, and were shown to scale with photon fluence.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0905846107DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2795774PMC
January 2010

Iterative reconstruction of a refractive-index profile from x-ray or neutron reflectivity measurements.

Phys Rev E Stat Nonlin Soft Matter Phys 2008 May 16;77(5 Pt 1):051604. Epub 2008 May 16.

Institut für Numerische und Angewandte Mathematik, Lotzestrasse 16-18, 37085 Göttingen, Germany.

Analysis of x-ray and neutron reflectivity is usually performed by modeling the density profile of the sample and performing a least square fit to the measured (phaseless) reflectivity data. Here we address the uniqueness of the reflectivity problem as well as its numerical reconstruction. In particular, we derive conditions for uniqueness, which are applicable in the kinematic limit (Born approximation), and for the most relevant case of box model profiles with Gaussian roughness. At the same time we present an iterative method to reconstruct the profile based on regularization methods. The method is successfully implemented and tested both on simulated and real experimental data.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevE.77.051604DOI Listing
May 2008

Structure of two-component lipid membranes on solid support: an x-ray reflectivity study.

Phys Rev E Stat Nonlin Soft Matter Phys 2006 Nov 15;74(5 Pt 1):051911. Epub 2006 Nov 15.

Institut für Röntgenphysik, Universität Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37073 Göttingen, Germany.

We report an x-ray reflectivity study of phospholipid membranes deposited on silicon by vesicle fusion. The samples investigated were composed of single phospholipid bilayers as well as two-component lipid bilayer systems with varied charge density. We show that the resolution obtained in the density profile across the bilayer is high enough to distinguish two head-group maxima in the profile if the sample is in the phase coexistence regime. The water layer between the bilayer and silicon is found to depend on the lipid surface charge density.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevE.74.051911DOI Listing
November 2006