Publications by authors named "Kjetil S Sundet"

5 Publications

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Body language reading of emotion in schizophrenia: Associations with symptoms and functional outcome.

Scand J Psychol 2017 Oct 22;58(5):359-366. Epub 2017 Aug 22.

NORMENT K. G. Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital & Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.

Our aim was to explore how body language reading of emotion relates to neurocognition, symptoms and functional outcome in schizophrenia. Fifty-four individuals with schizophrenia and eighty-four healthy controls participated in the study. Emotion perception was assessed with a point-light display (PLD) task, the Emotion in Biological Motion (EmoBio) test, neurocognition was measured with the MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery (MCCB), and functioning was indexed by one measure of functional capacity and by one self-report questionnaire. Clinical symptoms were assessed with a five factor Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) symptoms model. Participants with schizophrenia had impaired body language reading of emotions compared to healthy controls (Cohen's d = 0.69). In participants with schizophrenia, emotion perception was associated with neurocognition (r = 0.42), functional capacity (r = 0.27) and disorganization symptoms (r = -0.27). Mediation analyses showed that disorganization symptoms mediated the effects of emotion perception and neurocognition, respectively, on social functional capacity. These results suggest that in individuals with schizophrenia, reduced emotion perception from body movements has negative consequences for functional outcome, but that the effect is mediated through disorganization symptoms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/sjop.12381DOI Listing
October 2017

A sequence variant associating with educational attainment also affects childhood cognition.

Sci Rep 2016 11 4;6:36189. Epub 2016 Nov 4.

deCODE Genetics/Amgen, Inc., Reykjavik, Iceland.

Only a few common variants in the sequence of the genome have been shown to impact cognitive traits. Here we demonstrate that polygenic scores of educational attainment predict specific aspects of childhood cognition, as measured with IQ. Recently, three sequence variants were shown to associate with educational attainment, a confluence phenotype of genetic and environmental factors contributing to academic success. We show that one of these variants associating with educational attainment, rs4851266-T, also associates with Verbal IQ in dyslexic children (P = 4.3 × 10, β = 0.16 s.d.). The effect of 0.16 s.d. corresponds to 1.4 IQ points for heterozygotes and 2.8 IQ points for homozygotes. We verified this association in independent samples consisting of adults (P = 8.3 × 10, β = 0.12 s.d., combined P = 2.2 x 10, β = 0.14 s.d.). Childhood cognition is unlikely to be affected by education attained later in life, and the variant explains a greater fraction of the variance in verbal IQ than in educational attainment (0.7% vs 0.12%,. P = 1.0 × 10).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep36189DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5095652PMC
November 2016

Stability of executive functions in first episode psychosis: One year follow up study.

Psychiatry Res 2015 Aug 25;228(3):475-81. Epub 2015 Jun 25.

NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital & Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Kirkeveien 166, 0407 Oslo, Norway; Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1094 Blindern, 0317 Oslo, Norway.

Executive functioning is a multi-dimensional construct covering several sub-processes. The aim of this study was to determine whether executive functions, indexed by a broad range of executive measures remain stable in first episode psychosis (FEP) over time. Eighty-two patients and 107 age and gender matched healthy controls were assessed on five subdomains of executive functioning; working memory, fluency, flexibility, and inhibitory control at baseline and at 1 year follow-up. Results showed that patients performed significantly poorer than controls on all executive measures at both assessment points. In general executive functions remained stable from baseline to follow-up, although both groups improved on measures of inhibitory control and flexibility. In phonemic fluency, controls showed a slight improvement while patients showed a slight decline. Investigation of individual trajectories revealed some fluctuations in both groups over time, but mainly supports the group level findings. The implications of these results are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2015.05.060DOI Listing
August 2015

Clinical gains from including both dextroamphetamine and methylphenidate in stimulant trials.

J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol 2013 Nov 9;23(9):597-604. Epub 2013 May 9.

1 Østfold Hospital Trust , Neuropsychiatric Unit, Fredrikstad, Norway .

Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical gains from including both dextroamphetamine and methylphenidate in stimulant trials.

Method: Thirty-six medication-naïve children ages 9-14 years diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) were enrolled for 6 weeks in a crossover trial, with 2 weeks of methylphenidate, dextroamphetamine, and placebo, in a randomly assigned, counterbalanced sequence. Outcome measures constituted a computer-based continuous performance test combined with a motion tracking system (Qb Test) and an ADHD questionnaire rated by parents and teachers.

Results: Group analyses found significant treatment effects of similar size for the two stimulants on both outcome measures. Single-subject analyses revealed that each stimulant produced a favourable response in 26 children; however, an individual child frequently responded qualitatively or quantitatively differently to the two stimulants. By including both stimulants in the trial, the number of favorable responders increased from 26 (72%) to 33 (92%). In children with favorable responses of unequal strength to the two stimulants, a shift from inferior drug to best drug was associated with a 64% mean increase in the overall response strength score, as measured by the ADHD questionnaire.

Conclusions: The likelihood of a favorable response and optimal response strength is increased by including both stimulants in the stimulant trial. The study was first registered in clinical trials 28 September 2010. Clinical Trials.gov Identifier: NCT01220440.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cap.2012.0085DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3842881PMC
November 2013

Measuring cognitive insight in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: a comparative study.

BMC Psychiatry 2007 Dec 11;7:71. Epub 2007 Dec 11.

Division of Psychiatry, Ulleval University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.

Background: Beck Cognitive Insight Scale (BCIS) has been designed for assessment of self-reflection on patients' anomalous experiences and interpretations of own beliefs. The scale has been developed and validated for patients with schizophrenia. We wanted to study the utility of the scale for patients with bipolar disorder. The relationship between the BCIS as a measure of cognitive insight and established methods for assessment of insight of illness was explored in both diagnostic groups.

Methods: The BCIS self-report inventory was administered to patients with schizophrenia (n = 143), bipolar disorder (n = 92) and controls (n = 64). The 15 items of the inventory form two subscales, self-reflectiveness and self-certainty.

Results: The internal consistency of the subscales was good for the patient groups and the controls. The mean subscale scores were not significantly different for the three groups. Four items in subscale self-reflectiveness referring to psychotic experiences gave, however, different results in the control subjects. Self-certainty and scores on insight item PANSS correlated significantly in the schizophrenia, but not in the bipolar group.

Conclusion: BCIS with its two subscales seems applicable for patients with bipolar disorder as well as for patients with schizophrenia. The self-report inventory can also be applied to control subjects if the items referring to psychotic experiences are omitted. In schizophrenia high scores on self-certainty is possibly associated with poor insight of illness. For the bipolar group the subscales are largely independent of traditional insight measures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-244X-7-71DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2222246PMC
December 2007
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