Publications by authors named "Kirti Kaim"

8 Publications

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The second wave of COVID-19: effect on Indian health care system.

Horm Mol Biol Clin Investig 2021 Jul 30. Epub 2021 Jul 30.

Department of Biochemistry, University College of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/hmbci-2021-0040DOI Listing
July 2021

COVID-19 and neurology perspective.

Horm Mol Biol Clin Investig 2021 Feb 23;42(1):69-75. Epub 2021 Feb 23.

Department of Radio-diagnosis, Index Medical College, Hospital and Research Centre, Indore, Madhya Pradesh, India.

COVID-19 caused by SARS CoV2 (The novel corona virus) has already taken lives of many people across the globe even more than anyone could have imagined. This outbreak occurred in China and since then it is expanding its devastating effects by leaps and bounds. Initially it appeared to be an outbreak of pneumonia but soon it was found to be much more than that and the infectivity was found to be very high. This is the reason that it has taken whole globe in its trap and become a pandemic in such a short span of time. Death is occurring because it is a new virus and human body has no specific antibodies for it. Presently there is no approved vaccine so everyone is susceptible but people with co-morbidities appear to be in more risk and the best way for protection is social distancing and increasing one's natural immunity by taking healthy diet and exercise. When a person is infected the clinical presentation ranges from asymptomatic to severe ARDS, sudden onset of anosmia, headache, cough may be the initial symptoms. This review is focused on immunopathology and effect of COVID-19 on neurological disorders and also the neurological manifestations and the treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/hmbci-2020-0069DOI Listing
February 2021

COVID-19: a review on SARS-CoV-2 origin, epidemiology, virology, clinical manifestations and complications with special emphasis on adverse outcome in Bhopal Gas Tragedy survivor.

Horm Mol Biol Clin Investig 2021 Feb 19;42(1):63-68. Epub 2021 Feb 19.

Department of Ophthalmology, Indira Gandhi ESI Hospital, New Delhi, India.

After the global outbreak of coronaviruses caused diseases such as Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), an outbreak due to these viruses occurred in December, 2019 in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China and led to a worldwide spread. Coronavirus 2019 disease (COVID-19) has emerged as a serious global health emergency and spread from a person to another who has the virus. But the scope of an intermediate host is not known. Population at higher risk includes individuals in higher age group (>60 years) or with comorbidities such as diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease and weaker immune system. Many unknown and underestimate risk factors could be responsible for adverse outcomes in COVID-19. These risk factors should be appropriately identified, addressed and necessary actions should be taken to mitigate the effect of COVID-19 pandemic. Bhopal gas tragedy was one of the world's worst industrial chemical leak disaster. The survivors of this incident still suffer from the various complications such as increased rate of cancers, chronic illness like tuberculosis, respiratory diseases, birth defects, nerve injury, growth retardations, gynecological illness and many more. The survivors of Bhopal gas tragedy are at higher risk of developing COVID-19 related adverse outcome. One of the possible explanations can be long term effect of methyl isocyanate (MIC). MIC exposure can lead to possible toxic effect on genetic, epigenetic and non-genetic factors. In this review, we aim to establish the scientific basis for adverse outcome in COVID-19 patients who are also victims of Bhopal gas tragedy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/hmbci-2020-0070DOI Listing
February 2021

Kerala model for combating COVID-19 pandemic.

Horm Mol Biol Clin Investig 2021 Feb 12;42(1):1-2. Epub 2021 Feb 12.

Department of Biochemistry, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/hmbci-2021-0004DOI Listing
February 2021

COVID-19 and cardiovascular disease: a review of current knowledge.

Horm Mol Biol Clin Investig 2021 Feb 4;42(1):99-104. Epub 2021 Feb 4.

Department of Physiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India.

The uncontrolled spread of the COVID-19 pandemic which originated in China created a global turmoil. While the world is still busy figuring out a cure for the deadly disease, scientists worked out on many theories and conducted several studies to establish a relationship between the infection and other known diseases. Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are one of the major complications of this infection after the respiratory manifestations. Individuals with cardiovascular complication are said to be more susceptible to acquiring the infection because the novel coronavirus uses the ACE2 receptor for its entry inside the cell and there is a high level of ACE2 expression in individuals with cardiovascular complications because of the enzyme's anti-hypertrophic, anti-fibrotic and anti-hypertensive effects on the heart. Individuals who belong to the older age group are also more susceptible. Knowing the above information, it might seem that using ACE2 inhibitors would help to slow or prevent the entry of the novel coronavirus but it would also at the same time prove to have deleterious effects on the cardiovascular system as the protective functions of ACE2 would be lost. While the search for a cure still continues it has been stated many a times that the conditions might worsen with time and the only way to keep ourselves and our family safe would be to follow the appropriate social distancing methods and get a COVID test if we experience any of the major symptoms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/hmbci-2020-0052DOI Listing
February 2021

COVID-19 and geriatric population: from pathophysiology to clinical perspectives.

Horm Mol Biol Clin Investig 2021 Feb 4;42(1):87-98. Epub 2021 Feb 4.

Department of Physiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India.

The COVID-19 pandemic has not only led to a worldwide socio-economic depression, but has also had the highest health impact on the geriatric population. Elderly population, due to various reasons such as low immunity, pre-existing co-morbidities such as hypertension, cardiovascular diseases or diabetes, are obviously predisposed to develop severe infections and exhibit a high mortality rate. This is because of many reasons which include the atypical presentation in the geriatric population which might have led to diagnostic delay. As per the WHO guidelines to perform RT-PCR only on the symptomatic individuals, a very small portion of individuals were tested, leaving a fraction of population undiagnosed. Therefore, there remained a chance that many asymptomatic individuals such caregivers, healthcare professionals, family members were undiagnosed and might have carried this virus to the geriatric patients. Also, many countries were not prepared to handle the burden on their healthcare system which included sudden increased demand of ICU beds, mechanical ventilation etc. As a result, they had to make decision on who to be admitted. Atypical presentation in geriatric population may include afebrile or low-grade fever, absence of cough, malaise, muscle pains, dyspnoea etc. Geriatric population shows a more severe type of pneumonia, significantly higher number of neutrophils and C-reactive protein, less lymphocytes and a higher proportion of multiple lobe involvement. Extreme social suppression during COVID-19 pandemic has increased the risk of mental and physical adverse effects that has made older adults more vulnerable to depression and anxiety.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/hmbci-2020-0053DOI Listing
February 2021

COVID -19 outbreak - Diabetes aspect and perspective.

Curr Med Res Pract 2020 May-Jun;10(3):134. Epub 2020 May 19.

Department of Ophthalmology, Indira Gandhi ESI Hospital, Jhilmi, New Delhi, 110095, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cmrp.2020.05.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7236676PMC
May 2020

Association of prothrombotic adipokine (plasminogen activator inhibitor-1) with TSH in metabolic syndrome: a case control study.

Horm Mol Biol Clin Investig 2017 Dec 20;34(1). Epub 2017 Dec 20.

Department of Biochemistry, Lady Hardinge Medical College (LHMC), New Delhi, India.

Background Metabolic syndrome (MetS) involves a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors, including abnormal lipids, insulin resistance and hypertension. The aim of the present study is to investigate associations between thyroid profile and the pro-thrombotic mediator, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), in MetS and identify associated biochemical markers. Materials and methods The present study was a case control study and consisted of 50 diagnosed cases of MetS and 50 healthy volunteers as controls. MetS cases were further divided into two groups based on the presence and absence of subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH). Data collected included demographic profile, clinical history and routine lab investigation. Special investigations included the thyroid function test and serum PAI-1 levels. Results The mean serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels were significantly higher in MetS cases as compared to controls (5.7 ± 1.2 mIU/L vs. 2.3 ± 1.6 mIU/L, p < 0.0001), although the mean triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) levels were comparable in two groups. The mean levels of serum PAI-1 were significantly higher in MetS cases as compared to controls(231 ± 87 ng/mL vs. 185 ± 96 ng/mL, p = 0.013). TSH and PAI-1 levels were positively correlated with various markers of MetS and negatively correlated with high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Conclusion The present study points towards the presence of thyroid dysfunction, in the form of subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH), in cases of MetS. In the presence of thyroid dysfunction, abnormal adipocytes may release adipokines, such as PAI-1, which lead to increased risk of thrombotic episodes in these patients. Hence, SCH should be appropriately managed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/hmbci-2017-0046DOI Listing
December 2017
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