Publications by authors named "Kirsty McWalter"

71 Publications

Bi-allelic variants in SPATA5L1 lead to intellectual disability, spastic-dystonic cerebral palsy, epilepsy, and hearing loss.

Am J Hum Genet 2021 10;108(10):2006-2016

Institute of Human Genetics, Klinikum rechts der Isar, School of Medicine, Technical University of Munich, 81675 Munich, Germany.

Spermatogenesis-associated 5 like 1 (SPATA5L1) represents an orphan gene encoding a protein of unknown function. We report 28 bi-allelic variants in SPATA5L1 associated with sensorineural hearing loss in 47 individuals from 28 (26 unrelated) families. In addition, 25/47 affected individuals (53%) presented with microcephaly, developmental delay/intellectual disability, cerebral palsy, and/or epilepsy. Modeling indicated damaging effect of variants on the protein, largely via destabilizing effects on protein domains. Brain imaging revealed diminished cerebral volume, thin corpus callosum, and periventricular leukomalacia, and quantitative volumetry demonstrated significantly diminished white matter volumes in several individuals. Immunofluorescent imaging in rat hippocampal neurons revealed localization of Spata5l1 in neuronal and glial cell nuclei and more prominent expression in neurons. In the rodent inner ear, Spata5l1 is expressed in the neurosensory hair cells and inner ear supporting cells. Transcriptomic analysis performed with fibroblasts from affected individuals was able to distinguish affected from controls by principal components. Analysis of differentially expressed genes and networks suggested a role for SPATA5L1 in cell surface adhesion receptor function, intracellular focal adhesions, and DNA replication and mitosis. Collectively, our results indicate that bi-allelic SPATA5L1 variants lead to a human disease characterized by sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) with or without a nonprogressive mixed neurodevelopmental phenotype.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2021.08.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8546233PMC
October 2021

Expanding the KIF4A-associated phenotype.

Am J Med Genet A 2021 12 3;185(12):3728-3739. Epub 2021 Aug 3.

Medical Genetics, Institute of Medical Genetics and Pathology, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland.

Kinesin super family (KIF) genes encode motor kinesins, a family of evolutionary conserved proteins, involved in intracellular trafficking of various cargoes. These proteins are critical for various physiological processes including neuron function and survival, ciliary function and ciliogenesis, and cell-cycle progression. Recent evidence suggests that alterations in motor kinesin genes can lead to a variety of human diseases, including monogenic disorders. Neuropathies, impaired higher brain functions, structural brain abnormalities and multiple congenital anomalies (i.e., renal, urogenital, and limb anomalies) can result from pathogenic variants in many KIF genes. We expand the phenotype associated with KIF4A variants from developmental delay and intellectual disability with or without epilepsy to a congenital anomaly phenotype with hydrocephalus and various brain anomalies at the more severe end of phenotypic manifestations. Additional anomalies of the kidneys and urinary tract, congenital lymphedema, eye, and dental anomalies seem to be variably associated and overlap with clinical signs observed in other kinesinopathies. Caution still applies to missense variants, but hopefully, future work will further establish genotype-phenotype correlations in a larger number of patients and functional studies may give further insights into the complex function of KIF4A.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.62443DOI Listing
December 2021

Pathogenic MAST3 Variants in the STK Domain Are Associated with Epilepsy.

Ann Neurol 2021 08 13;90(2):274-284. Epub 2021 Jul 13.

Epilepsy Research Centre, Department of Medicine, Austin Health, The University of Melbourne, Heidelberg, VIC, Australia.

Objective: The MAST family of microtubule-associated serine-threonine kinases (STKs) have distinct expression patterns in the developing and mature human and mouse brain. To date, only MAST1 has been conclusively associated with neurological disease, with de novo variants in individuals with a neurodevelopmental disorder, including a mega corpus callosum.

Methods: Using exome sequencing, we identify MAST3 missense variants in individuals with epilepsy. We also assess the effect of these variants on the ability of MAST3 to phosphorylate the target gene product ARPP-16 in HEK293T cells.

Results: We identify de novo missense variants in the STK domain in 11 individuals, including 2 recurrent variants p.G510S (n = 5) and p.G515S (n = 3). All 11 individuals had developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, with 8 having normal development prior to seizure onset at <2 years of age. All patients developed multiple seizure types, 9 of 11 patients had seizures triggered by fever and 9 of 11 patients had drug-resistant seizures. In vitro analysis of HEK293T cells transfected with MAST3 cDNA carrying a subset of these patient-specific missense variants demonstrated variable but generally lower expression, with concomitant increased phosphorylation of the MAST3 target, ARPP-16, compared to wild-type. These findings suggest the patient-specific variants may confer MAST3 gain-of-function. Moreover, single-nuclei RNA sequencing and immunohistochemistry shows that MAST3 expression is restricted to excitatory neurons in the cortex late in prenatal development and postnatally.

Interpretation: In summary, we describe MAST3 as a novel epilepsy-associated gene with a potential gain-of-function pathogenic mechanism that may be primarily restricted to excitatory neurons in the cortex. ANN NEUROL 2021;90:274-284.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ana.26147DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8324566PMC
August 2021

TSPEAR variants are primarily associated with ectodermal dysplasia and tooth agenesis but not hearing loss: A novel cohort study.

Am J Med Genet A 2021 08 27;185(8):2417-2433. Epub 2021 May 27.

Faculté de Chirurgie Dentaire, Université de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France.

Biallelic loss-of-function variants in the thrombospondin-type laminin G domain and epilepsy-associated repeats (TSPEAR) gene have recently been associated with ectodermal dysplasia and hearing loss. The first reports describing a TSPEAR disease association identified this gene is a cause of nonsyndromic hearing loss, but subsequent reports involving additional affected families have questioned this evidence and suggested a stronger association with ectodermal dysplasia. To clarify genotype-phenotype associations for TSPEAR variants, we characterized 13 individuals with biallelic TSPEAR variants. Individuals underwent either exome sequencing or panel-based genetic testing. Nearly all of these newly reported individuals (11/13) have phenotypes that include tooth agenesis or ectodermal dysplasia, while three newly reported individuals have hearing loss. Of the individuals displaying hearing loss, all have additional variants in other hearing-loss-associated genes, specifically TMPRSS3, GJB2, and GJB6, that present competing candidates for their hearing loss phenotype. When presented alongside previous reports, the overall evidence supports the association of TSPEAR variants with ectodermal dysplasia and tooth agenesis features but creates significant doubt as to whether TSPEAR variants are a monogenic cause of hearing loss. Further functional evidence is needed to evaluate this phenotypic association.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.62347DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8361973PMC
August 2021

Genotype-phenotype correlations and novel molecular insights into the DHX30-associated neurodevelopmental disorders.

Genome Med 2021 05 21;13(1):90. Epub 2021 May 21.

Département de Génétique, Hôpital La Pitié-Salpêtrière, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France.

Background: We aimed to define the clinical and variant spectrum and to provide novel molecular insights into the DHX30-associated neurodevelopmental disorder.

Methods: Clinical and genetic data from affected individuals were collected through Facebook-based family support group, GeneMatcher, and our network of collaborators. We investigated the impact of novel missense variants with respect to ATPase and helicase activity, stress granule (SG) formation, global translation, and their effect on embryonic development in zebrafish. SG formation was additionally analyzed in CRISPR/Cas9-mediated DHX30-deficient HEK293T and zebrafish models, along with in vivo behavioral assays.

Results: We identified 25 previously unreported individuals, ten of whom carry novel variants, two of which are recurrent, and provide evidence of gonadal mosaicism in one family. All 19 individuals harboring heterozygous missense variants within helicase core motifs (HCMs) have global developmental delay, intellectual disability, severe speech impairment, and gait abnormalities. These variants impair the ATPase and helicase activity of DHX30, trigger SG formation, interfere with global translation, and cause developmental defects in a zebrafish model. Notably, 4 individuals harboring heterozygous variants resulting either in haploinsufficiency or truncated proteins presented with a milder clinical course, similar to an individual harboring a de novo mosaic HCM missense variant. Functionally, we established DHX30 as an ATP-dependent RNA helicase and as an evolutionary conserved factor in SG assembly. Based on the clinical course, the variant location, and type we establish two distinct clinical subtypes. DHX30 loss-of-function variants cause a milder phenotype whereas a severe phenotype is caused by HCM missense variants that, in addition to the loss of ATPase and helicase activity, lead to a detrimental gain-of-function with respect to SG formation. Behavioral characterization of dhx30-deficient zebrafish revealed altered sleep-wake activity and social interaction, partially resembling the human phenotype.

Conclusions: Our study highlights the usefulness of social media to define novel Mendelian disorders and exemplifies how functional analyses accompanied by clinical and genetic findings can define clinically distinct subtypes for ultra-rare disorders. Such approaches require close interdisciplinary collaboration between families/legal representatives of the affected individuals, clinicians, molecular genetics diagnostic laboratories, and research laboratories.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13073-021-00900-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8140440PMC
May 2021

Pathogenic variants in , a chromatin remodeler, cause a range of syndromic neurodevelopmental features.

Sci Adv 2021 May 12;7(20). Epub 2021 May 12.

Division of Genetics and Metabolism, Phoenix Children's Hospital, Phoenix, AZ, USA.

Intellectual disability encompasses a wide spectrum of neurodevelopmental disorders, with many linked genetic loci. However, the underlying molecular mechanism for more than 50% of the patients remains elusive. We describe pathogenic variants in , encoding the ATPase motor of the ISWI chromatin remodeler, as a cause of a previously unidentified neurodevelopmental disorder, identifying 12 individuals with de novo or dominantly segregating rare heterozygous variants. Accompanying phenotypes include mild developmental delay, frequent postnatal short stature and microcephaly, and recurrent dysmorphic features. Loss of function of the SMARCA5 ortholog led to smaller body size, reduced sensory dendrite complexity, and tiling defects in larvae. In adult flies, Iswi neural knockdown caused decreased brain size, aberrant mushroom body morphology, and abnormal locomotor function. loss of function was rescued by wild-type but not mutant SMARCA5. Our results demonstrate that pathogenic variants cause a neurodevelopmental syndrome with mild facial dysmorphia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.abf2066DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8115915PMC
May 2021

Haploinsufficiency of the Sin3/HDAC corepressor complex member SIN3B causes a syndromic intellectual disability/autism spectrum disorder.

Am J Hum Genet 2021 05 2;108(5):929-941. Epub 2021 Apr 2.

Etablissement Français du Sang, 44000 Nantes, France; CRCINA, INSERM, CNRS, Université d'Angers, Université de Nantes, 44000 Nantes, France; LabEx IGO, Nantes 44000, France.

Proteins involved in transcriptional regulation harbor a demonstrated enrichment of mutations in neurodevelopmental disorders. The Sin3 (Swi-independent 3)/histone deacetylase (HDAC) complex plays a central role in histone deacetylation and transcriptional repression. Among the two vertebrate paralogs encoding the Sin3 complex, SIN3A variants cause syndromic intellectual disability, but the clinical consequences of SIN3B haploinsufficiency in humans are uncharacterized. Here, we describe a syndrome hallmarked by intellectual disability, developmental delay, and dysmorphic facial features with variably penetrant autism spectrum disorder, congenital malformations, corpus callosum defects, and impaired growth caused by disruptive SIN3B variants. Using chromosomal microarray or exome sequencing, and through international data sharing efforts, we identified nine individuals with heterozygous SIN3B deletion or single-nucleotide variants. Five individuals harbor heterozygous deletions encompassing SIN3B that reside within a ∼230 kb minimal region of overlap on 19p13.11, two individuals have a rare nonsynonymous substitution, and two individuals have a single-nucleotide deletion that results in a frameshift and predicted premature termination codon. To test the relevance of SIN3B impairment to measurable aspects of the human phenotype, we disrupted the orthologous zebrafish locus by genome editing and transient suppression. The mutant and morphant larvae display altered craniofacial patterning, commissural axon defects, and reduced body length supportive of an essential role for Sin3 function in growth and patterning of anterior structures. To investigate further the molecular consequences of SIN3B variants, we quantified genome-wide enhancer and promoter activity states by using H3K27ac ChIP-seq. We show that, similar to SIN3A mutations, SIN3B disruption causes hyperacetylation of a subset of enhancers and promoters in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Together, these data demonstrate that SIN3B haploinsufficiency leads to a hitherto unknown intellectual disability/autism syndrome, uncover a crucial role of SIN3B in the central nervous system, and define the epigenetic landscape associated with Sin3 complex impairment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2021.03.017DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8206166PMC
May 2021

SPEN haploinsufficiency causes a neurodevelopmental disorder overlapping proximal 1p36 deletion syndrome with an episignature of X chromosomes in females.

Am J Hum Genet 2021 03 16;108(3):502-516. Epub 2021 Feb 16.

Division of Medical Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, UPMC Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15224, USA.

Deletion 1p36 (del1p36) syndrome is the most common human disorder resulting from a terminal autosomal deletion. This condition is molecularly and clinically heterogeneous. Deletions involving two non-overlapping regions, known as the distal (telomeric) and proximal (centromeric) critical regions, are sufficient to cause the majority of the recurrent clinical features, although with different facial features and dysmorphisms. SPEN encodes a transcriptional repressor commonly deleted in proximal del1p36 syndrome and is located centromeric to the proximal 1p36 critical region. Here, we used clinical data from 34 individuals with truncating variants in SPEN to define a neurodevelopmental disorder presenting with features that overlap considerably with those of proximal del1p36 syndrome. The clinical profile of this disease includes developmental delay/intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorder, anxiety, aggressive behavior, attention deficit disorder, hypotonia, brain and spine anomalies, congenital heart defects, high/narrow palate, facial dysmorphisms, and obesity/increased BMI, especially in females. SPEN also emerges as a relevant gene for del1p36 syndrome by co-expression analyses. Finally, we show that haploinsufficiency of SPEN is associated with a distinctive DNA methylation episignature of the X chromosome in affected females, providing further evidence of a specific contribution of the protein to the epigenetic control of this chromosome, and a paradigm of an X chromosome-specific episignature that classifies syndromic traits. We conclude that SPEN is required for multiple developmental processes and SPEN haploinsufficiency is a major contributor to a disorder associated with deletions centromeric to the previously established 1p36 critical regions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2021.01.015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8008487PMC
March 2021

Mutation-specific pathophysiological mechanisms define different neurodevelopmental disorders associated with SATB1 dysfunction.

Am J Hum Genet 2021 02 28;108(2):346-356. Epub 2021 Jan 28.

Department of Rehabilitation and Development, Randall Children's Hospital at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center, Portland, OR 97227, USA.

Whereas large-scale statistical analyses can robustly identify disease-gene relationships, they do not accurately capture genotype-phenotype correlations or disease mechanisms. We use multiple lines of independent evidence to show that different variant types in a single gene, SATB1, cause clinically overlapping but distinct neurodevelopmental disorders. Clinical evaluation of 42 individuals carrying SATB1 variants identified overt genotype-phenotype relationships, associated with different pathophysiological mechanisms, established by functional assays. Missense variants in the CUT1 and CUT2 DNA-binding domains result in stronger chromatin binding, increased transcriptional repression, and a severe phenotype. In contrast, variants predicted to result in haploinsufficiency are associated with a milder clinical presentation. A similarly mild phenotype is observed for individuals with premature protein truncating variants that escape nonsense-mediated decay, which are transcriptionally active but mislocalized in the cell. Our results suggest that in-depth mutation-specific genotype-phenotype studies are essential to capture full disease complexity and to explain phenotypic variability.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2021.01.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7895900PMC
February 2021

Histone H3.3 beyond cancer: Germline mutations in cause a previously unidentified neurodegenerative disorder in 46 patients.

Sci Adv 2020 Dec 2;6(49). Epub 2020 Dec 2.

Institut für Neurogenomik, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Munich, Germany.

Although somatic mutations in Histone 3.3 (H3.3) are well-studied drivers of oncogenesis, the role of germline mutations remains unreported. We analyze 46 patients bearing de novo germline mutations in histone 3 family 3A () or with progressive neurologic dysfunction and congenital anomalies without malignancies. Molecular modeling of all 37 variants demonstrated clear disruptions in interactions with DNA, other histones, and histone chaperone proteins. Patient histone posttranslational modifications (PTMs) analysis revealed notably aberrant local PTM patterns distinct from the somatic lysine mutations that cause global PTM dysregulation. RNA sequencing on patient cells demonstrated up-regulated gene expression related to mitosis and cell division, and cellular assays confirmed an increased proliferative capacity. A zebrafish model showed craniofacial anomalies and a defect in Foxd3-derived glia. These data suggest that the mechanism of germline mutations are distinct from cancer-associated somatic histone mutations but may converge on control of cell proliferation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.abc9207DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7821880PMC
December 2020

An autosomal dominant neurological disorder caused by de novo variants in FAR1 resulting in uncontrolled synthesis of ether lipids.

Genet Med 2021 04 26;23(4):740-750. Epub 2020 Nov 26.

NIH Undiagnosed Diseases Program, Office of the Clinical Director, National Human Genome Research Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA.

Purpose: In this study we investigate the disease etiology in 12 patients with de novo variants in FAR1 all resulting in an amino acid change at position 480 (p.Arg480Cys/His/Leu).

Methods: Following next-generation sequencing and clinical phenotyping, functional characterization was performed in patients' fibroblasts using FAR1 enzyme analysis, FAR1 immunoblotting/immunofluorescence, and lipidomics.

Results: All patients had spastic paraparesis and bilateral congenital/juvenile cataracts, in most combined with speech and gross motor developmental delay and truncal hypotonia. FAR1 deficiency caused by biallelic variants results in defective ether lipid synthesis and plasmalogen deficiency. In contrast, patients' fibroblasts with the de novo FAR1 variants showed elevated plasmalogen levels. Further functional studies in fibroblasts showed that these variants cause a disruption of the plasmalogen-dependent feedback regulation of FAR1 protein levels leading to uncontrolled ether lipid production.

Conclusion: Heterozygous de novo variants affecting the Arg480 residue of FAR1 lead to an autosomal dominant disorder with a different disease mechanism than that of recessive FAR1 deficiency and a diametrically opposed biochemical phenotype. Our findings show that for patients with spastic paraparesis and bilateral cataracts, FAR1 should be considered as a candidate gene and added to gene panels for hereditary spastic paraplegia, cerebral palsy, and juvenile cataracts.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41436-020-01027-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8026396PMC
April 2021

Germline AGO2 mutations impair RNA interference and human neurological development.

Nat Commun 2020 11 16;11(1):5797. Epub 2020 Nov 16.

Department of Genetics, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, ON, Canada.

ARGONAUTE-2 and associated miRNAs form the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), which targets mRNAs for translational silencing and degradation as part of the RNA interference pathway. Despite the essential nature of this process for cellular function, there is little information on the role of RISC components in human development and organ function. We identify 13 heterozygous mutations in AGO2 in 21 patients affected by disturbances in neurological development. Each of the identified single amino acid mutations result in impaired shRNA-mediated silencing. We observe either impaired RISC formation or increased binding of AGO2 to mRNA targets as mutation specific functional consequences. The latter is supported by decreased phosphorylation of a C-terminal serine cluster involved in mRNA target release, increased formation of dendritic P-bodies in neurons and global transcriptome alterations in patient-derived primary fibroblasts. Our data emphasize the importance of gene expression regulation through the dynamic AGO2-RNA association for human neuronal development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-19572-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7670403PMC
November 2020

Defining the genotypic and phenotypic spectrum of X-linked MSL3-related disorder.

Genet Med 2021 02 11;23(2):384-395. Epub 2020 Nov 11.

Department of Pediatrics, Section of Genetics, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, USA.

Purpose: We sought to delineate the genotypic and phenotypic spectrum of female and male individuals with X-linked, MSL3-related disorder (Basilicata-Akhtar syndrome).

Methods: Twenty-five individuals (15 males, 10 females) with causative variants in MSL3 were ascertained through exome or genome sequencing at ten different sequencing centers.

Results: We identified multiple variant types in MSL3 (ten nonsense, six frameshift, four splice site, three missense, one in-frame-deletion, one multi-exon deletion), most proven to be de novo, and clustering in the terminal eight exons suggesting that truncating variants in the first five exons might be compensated by an alternative MSL3 transcript. Three-dimensional modeling of missense and splice variants indicated that these have a deleterious effect. The main clinical findings comprised developmental delay and intellectual disability ranging from mild to severe. Autism spectrum disorder, muscle tone abnormalities, and macrocephaly were common as well as hearing impairment and gastrointestinal problems. Hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis emerged as a consistent magnetic resonance image (MRI) finding. Females and males were equally affected. Using facial analysis technology, a recognizable facial gestalt was determined.

Conclusion: Our aggregated data illustrate the genotypic and phenotypic spectrum of X-linked, MSL3-related disorder (Basilicata-Akhtar syndrome). Our cohort improves the understanding of disease related morbidity and allows us to propose detailed surveillance guidelines for affected individuals.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41436-020-00993-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7862064PMC
February 2021

New insights into the clinical and molecular spectrum of the novel CYFIP2-related neurodevelopmental disorder and impairment of the WRC-mediated actin dynamics.

Genet Med 2021 03 5;23(3):543-554. Epub 2020 Nov 5.

Department of Medical Genetics, Lyon University Hospital, Lyon, France.

Purpose: A few de novo missense variants in the cytoplasmic FMRP-interacting protein 2 (CYFIP2) gene have recently been described as a novel cause of severe intellectual disability, seizures, and hypotonia in 18 individuals, with p.Arg87 substitutions in the majority.

Methods: We assembled data from 19 newly identified and all 18 previously published individuals with CYFIP2 variants. By structural modeling and investigation of WAVE-regulatory complex (WRC)-mediated actin polymerization in six patient fibroblast lines we assessed the impact of CYFIP2 variants on the WRC.

Results: Sixteen of 19 individuals harbor two previously described and 11 novel (likely) disease-associated missense variants. We report p.Asp724 as second mutational hotspot (4/19 cases). Genotype-phenotype correlation confirms a consistently severe phenotype in p.Arg87 patients but a more variable phenotype in p.Asp724 and other substitutions. Three individuals with milder phenotypes carry putative loss-of-function variants, which remain of unclear pathogenicity. Structural modeling predicted missense variants to disturb interactions within the WRC or impair CYFIP2 stability. Consistent with its role in WRC-mediated actin polymerization we substantiate aberrant regulation of the actin cytoskeleton in patient fibroblasts.

Conclusion: Our study expands the clinical and molecular spectrum of CYFIP2-related neurodevelopmental disorder and provides evidence for aberrant WRC-mediated actin dynamics as contributing cellular pathomechanism.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41436-020-01011-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7935717PMC
March 2021

De novo variants in MPP5 cause global developmental delay and behavioral changes.

Hum Mol Genet 2020 12;29(20):3388-3401

Division of Newborn Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

Membrane Protein Palmitoylated 5 (MPP5) is a highly conserved apical complex protein essential for cell polarity, fate and survival. Defects in cell polarity are associated with neurologic disorders including autism and microcephaly. MPP5 is essential for neurogenesis in animal models, but human variants leading to neurologic impairment have not been described. We identified three patients with heterozygous MPP5 de novo variants (DNV) and global developmental delay (GDD) and compared their phenotypes and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to ascertain how MPP5 DNV leads to GDD. All three patients with MPP5 DNV experienced GDD with language delay/regression and behavioral changes. MRI ranged from normal to decreased gyral folding and microcephaly. The effects of MPP5 depletion on the developing brain were assessed by creating a heterozygous conditional knock out (het CKO) murine model with central nervous system (CNS)-specific Nestin-Cre drivers. In the het CKO model, Mpp5 depletion led to microcephaly, decreased cerebellar volume and cortical thickness. Het CKO mice had decreased ependymal cells and Mpp5 at the apical surface of cortical ventricular zone compared with wild type. Het CKO mice also failed to maintain progenitor pools essential for neurogenesis. The proportion of cortical cells undergoing apoptotic cell death increased, suggesting that cell death reduces progenitor population and neuron number. Het CKO mice also showed behavioral changes, similar to our patients. To our knowledge, this is the first report to show that variants in MPP5 are associated with GDD, behavioral abnormalities and language regression/delay. Murine modeling shows that neurogenesis is likely altered in these individuals, with cell death and skewed cellular composition playing significant roles.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/hmg/ddaa224DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7906781PMC
December 2020

Heterozygous de novo variants in CSNK1G1 are associated with syndromic developmental delay and autism spectrum disorder.

Clin Genet 2020 12 12;98(6):571-576. Epub 2020 Oct 12.

Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Division of Human Genetics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.

The gamma-1 isoform of casein kinase 1, the protein encoded by CSNK1G1, is involved in the growth and morphogenesis of cells. This protein is expressed ubiquitously among many tissue types, including the brain, where it regulates the phosphorylation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and plays a role in synaptic transmission. One prior individual with a de novo variant in CSNK1G presenting with severe developmental delay and early-onset epilepsy has been reported. Here we report an updated clinical history of this previously published case, as well as four additional individuals with de novo variants in CSNK1G1 identified via microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization, exome, or genome sequencing. All individuals (n = 5) had developmental delay. At least three individuals had diagnoses of autism spectrum disorder. All participants were noted to have dysmorphic facial features, although the reported findings varied widely and therefore may not clearly be recognizable. None of the participants had additional major malformations. Taken together, our data suggest that CSNK1G1 may be a cause of syndromic developmental delay and possibly autism spectrum disorder.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cge.13851DOI Listing
December 2020

Boricua Founder Variant in Causes Epileptic Encephalopathy With Hyperkinetic Movements.

J Child Neurol 2021 02 15;36(2):93-98. Epub 2020 Sep 15.

Section of Neurology, Department of Pediatrics, 14521St. Christopher's Hospital for Children Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

Objective: To describe a founder mutation effect and the clinical phenotype of homozygous c.737_739delGAG (p.Gly246del) variant in 15 children of Puerto Rican (Boricua) ancestry presenting with early infantile epileptic encephalopathy (EIEE-37) with prominent movement disorder.

Background: EIEE-37 is caused by biallelic loss of function variants in the gene, which is critical for AMPA-receptor function, resulting in intractable epilepsy and dyskinesia.

Methods: A retrospective, multicenter chart review of patients sharing the same homozygous (p.Gly246del) pathogenic variant identified by clinical genetic testing. Clinical information was collected regarding neurodevelopmental outcomes, neuroimaging, electrographic features and clinical response to antiseizure medications.

Results: Fifteen patients from 12 different families of Puerto Rican ancestry were homozygous for the (p.Gly246del) pathogenic variant, with ages ranging from 1 to 25 years. The onset of seizures was from 6 to 24 months. All had hypotonia, severe global developmental delay, and most had hyperkinetic involuntary movements. Developmental regression during the first year of life was common (86%). Electroencephalogram showed hypsarrhythmia in 66% (10/15), with many older children evolving into Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Six patients demonstrated progressive volume loss and/or cerebellar atrophy on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

Conclusions: We describe the largest cohort to date of patients with epileptic encephalopathy. We estimate that 0.76% of unaffected individuals of Puerto Rican ancestry carry this pathogenic variant due to a founder effect. Children homozygous for the (p.Gly246del) Boricua variant exhibit a very homogenous phenotype of early developmental regression and epilepsy, starting with infantile spasms and evolving into Lennox-Gastaut syndrome with hyperkinetic movement disorder.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0883073820953001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8496110PMC
February 2021

Variants in SCAF4 Cause a Neurodevelopmental Disorder and Are Associated with Impaired mRNA Processing.

Am J Hum Genet 2020 09 29;107(3):544-554. Epub 2020 Jul 29.

University of South Dakota, Sanford School of Medicine, Sioux Falls, SD 57105, USA.

RNA polymerase II interacts with various other complexes and factors to ensure correct initiation, elongation, and termination of mRNA transcription. One of these proteins is SR-related CTD-associated factor 4 (SCAF4), which is important for correct usage of polyA sites for mRNA termination. Using exome sequencing and international matchmaking, we identified nine likely pathogenic germline variants in SCAF4 including two splice-site and seven truncating variants, all residing in the N-terminal two thirds of the protein. Eight of these variants occurred de novo, and one was inherited. Affected individuals demonstrated a variable neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by mild intellectual disability, seizures, behavioral abnormalities, and various skeletal and structural anomalies. Paired-end RNA sequencing on blood lymphocytes of SCAF4-deficient individuals revealed a broad deregulation of more than 9,000 genes and significant differential splicing of more than 2,900 genes, indicating an important role of SCAF4 in mRNA processing. Knockdown of the SCAF4 ortholog CG4266 in the model organism Drosophila melanogaster resulted in impaired locomotor function, learning, and short-term memory. Furthermore, we observed an increased number of active zones in larval neuromuscular junctions, representing large glutamatergic synapses. These observations indicate a role of CG4266 in nervous system development and function and support the implication of SCAF4 in neurodevelopmental phenotypes. In summary, our data show that heterozygous, likely gene-disrupting variants in SCAF4 are causative for a variable neurodevelopmental disorder associated with impaired mRNA processing.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2020.06.019DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7477272PMC
September 2020

Genotype-phenotype correlation at codon 1740 of SETD2.

Am J Med Genet A 2020 09 24;182(9):2037-2048. Epub 2020 Jul 24.

Department of Genetics, University of Groningen, University Medical Centre Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.

The SET domain containing 2, histone lysine methyltransferase encoded by SETD2 is a dual-function methyltransferase for histones and microtubules and plays an important role for transcriptional regulation, genomic stability, and cytoskeletal functions. Specifically, SETD2 is associated with trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 36 (H3K36me3) and methylation of α-tubulin at lysine 40. Heterozygous loss of function and missense variants have previously been described with Luscan-Lumish syndrome (LLS), which is characterized by overgrowth, neurodevelopmental features, and absence of overt congenital anomalies. We have identified 15 individuals with de novo variants in codon 1740 of SETD2 whose features differ from those with LLS. Group 1 consists of 12 individuals with heterozygous variant c.5218C>T p.(Arg1740Trp) and Group 2 consists of 3 individuals with heterozygous variant c.5219G>A p.(Arg1740Gln). The phenotype of Group 1 includes microcephaly, profound intellectual disability, congenital anomalies affecting several organ systems, and similar facial features. Individuals in Group 2 had moderate to severe intellectual disability, low normal head circumference, and absence of additional major congenital anomalies. While LLS is likely due to loss of function of SETD2, the clinical features seen in individuals with variants affecting codon 1740 are more severe suggesting an alternative mechanism, such as gain of function, effects on epigenetic regulation, or posttranslational modification of the cytoskeleton. Our report is a prime example of different mutations in the same gene causing diverging phenotypes and the features observed in Group 1 suggest a new clinically recognizable syndrome uniquely associated with the heterozygous variant c.5218C>T p.(Arg1740Trp) in SETD2.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.61724DOI Listing
September 2020

Mutations in FAM50A suggest that Armfield XLID syndrome is a spliceosomopathy.

Nat Commun 2020 07 23;11(1):3698. Epub 2020 Jul 23.

Center for Human Disease Modeling, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA.

Intellectual disability (ID) is a heterogeneous clinical entity and includes an excess of males who harbor variants on the X-chromosome (XLID). We report rare FAM50A missense variants in the original Armfield XLID syndrome family localized in Xq28 and four additional unrelated males with overlapping features. Our fam50a knockout (KO) zebrafish model exhibits abnormal neurogenesis and craniofacial patterning, and in vivo complementation assays indicate that the patient-derived variants are hypomorphic. RNA sequencing analysis from fam50a KO zebrafish show dysregulation of the transcriptome, with augmented spliceosome mRNAs and depletion of transcripts involved in neurodevelopment. Zebrafish RNA-seq datasets show a preponderance of 3' alternative splicing events in fam50a KO, suggesting a role in the spliceosome C complex. These data are supported with transcriptomic signatures from cell lines derived from affected individuals and FAM50A protein-protein interaction data. In sum, Armfield XLID syndrome is a spliceosomopathy associated with aberrant mRNA processing during development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-17452-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7378245PMC
July 2020

De Novo Variants in CNOT1, a Central Component of the CCR4-NOT Complex Involved in Gene Expression and RNA and Protein Stability, Cause Neurodevelopmental Delay.

Am J Hum Genet 2020 07 17;107(1):164-172. Epub 2020 Jun 17.

Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, Cambridge, UK.

CNOT1 is a member of the CCR4-NOT complex, which is a master regulator, orchestrating gene expression, RNA deadenylation, and protein ubiquitination. We report on 39 individuals with heterozygous de novo CNOT1 variants, including missense, splice site, and nonsense variants, who present with a clinical spectrum of intellectual disability, motor delay, speech delay, seizures, hypotonia, and behavioral problems. To link CNOT1 dysfunction to the neurodevelopmental phenotype observed, we generated variant-specific Drosophila models, which showed learning and memory defects upon CNOT1 knockdown. Introduction of human wild-type CNOT1 was able to rescue this phenotype, whereas mutants could not or only partially, supporting our hypothesis that CNOT1 impairment results in neurodevelopmental delay. Furthermore, the genetic interaction with autism-spectrum genes, such as ASH1L, DYRK1A, MED13, and SHANK3, was impaired in our Drosophila models. Molecular characterization of CNOT1 variants revealed normal CNOT1 expression levels, with both mutant and wild-type alleles expressed at similar levels. Analysis of protein-protein interactions with other members indicated that the CCR4-NOT complex remained intact. An integrated omics approach of patient-derived genomics and transcriptomics data suggested only minimal effects on endonucleolytic nonsense-mediated mRNA decay components, suggesting that de novo CNOT1 variants are likely haploinsufficient hypomorph or neomorph, rather than dominant negative. In summary, we provide strong evidence that de novo CNOT1 variants cause neurodevelopmental delay with a wide range of additional co-morbidities. Whereas the underlying pathophysiological mechanism warrants further analysis, our data demonstrate an essential and central role of the CCR4-NOT complex in human brain development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2020.05.017DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7332645PMC
July 2020

Mutations in the KIF21B kinesin gene cause neurodevelopmental disorders through imbalanced canonical motor activity.

Nat Commun 2020 05 15;11(1):2441. Epub 2020 May 15.

Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire, Illkirch, France.

KIF21B is a kinesin protein that promotes intracellular transport and controls microtubule dynamics. We report three missense variants and one duplication in KIF21B in individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders associated with brain malformations, including corpus callosum agenesis (ACC) and microcephaly. We demonstrate, in vivo, that the expression of KIF21B missense variants specifically recapitulates patients' neurodevelopmental abnormalities, including microcephaly and reduced intra- and inter-hemispheric connectivity. We establish that missense KIF21B variants impede neuronal migration through attenuation of kinesin autoinhibition leading to aberrant KIF21B motility activity. We also show that the ACC-related KIF21B variant independently perturbs axonal growth and ipsilateral axon branching through two distinct mechanisms, both leading to deregulation of canonical kinesin motor activity. The duplication introduces a premature termination codon leading to nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. Although we demonstrate that Kif21b haploinsufficiency leads to an impaired neuronal positioning, the duplication variant might not be pathogenic. Altogether, our data indicate that impaired KIF21B autoregulation and function play a critical role in the pathogenicity of human neurodevelopmental disorder.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-16294-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7229210PMC
May 2020

Characterization of SETD1A haploinsufficiency in humans and Drosophila defines a novel neurodevelopmental syndrome.

Mol Psychiatry 2021 06 28;26(6):2013-2024. Epub 2020 Apr 28.

Center for Pediatric Genomic Medicine, Children's Mercy Hospital, University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO, USA.

Defects in histone methyltransferases (HMTs) are major contributing factors in neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs). Heterozygous variants of SETD1A involved in histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methylation were previously identified in individuals with schizophrenia. Here, we define the clinical features of the Mendelian syndrome associated with haploinsufficiency of SETD1A by investigating 15 predominantly pediatric individuals who all have de novo SETD1A variants. These individuals present with a core set of symptoms comprising global developmental delay and/or intellectual disability, subtle facial dysmorphisms, behavioral and psychiatric problems. We examined cellular phenotypes in three patient-derived lymphoblastoid cell lines with three variants: p.Gly535Alafs*12, c.4582-2_4582delAG, and p.Tyr1499Asp. These patient cell lines displayed DNA damage repair defects that were comparable to previously observed RNAi-mediated depletion of SETD1A. This suggested that these variants, including the p.Tyr1499Asp in the catalytic SET domain, behave as loss-of-function (LoF) alleles. Previous studies demonstrated a role for SETD1A in cell cycle control and differentiation. However, individuals with SETD1A variants do not show major structural brain defects or severe microcephaly, suggesting that defective proliferation and differentiation of neural progenitors is unlikely the single underlying cause of the disorder. We show here that the Drosophila melanogaster SETD1A orthologue is required in postmitotic neurons of the fly brain for normal memory, suggesting a role in post development neuronal function. Together, this study defines a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by dominant de novo LoF variants in SETD1A and further supports a role for H3K4 methyltransferases in the regulation of neuronal processes underlying normal cognitive functioning.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41380-020-0725-5DOI Listing
June 2021

Pathogenic variants in cause a genetic disorder characterised by developmental delay/intellectual disability and a spectrum of neurobehavioural phenotypes including autism and ADHD.

J Med Genet 2020 10 9;57(10):717-724. Epub 2020 Mar 9.

GeneDx, Gaithersburg, Maryland, USA.

Background: Rare variants in hundreds of genes have been implicated in developmental delay (DD), intellectual disability (ID) and neurobehavioural phenotypes. encodes a protein important for RNA silencing. Heterozygous truncating variants have been reported in three patients from large cohorts with autism, but no full phenotypic characterisation was described.

Methods: Clinical and molecular characterisation was performed on 17 patients with variants. Clinical data were obtained by retrospective chart review, parent interviews, direct patient interaction with providers and formal neuropsychological evaluation.

Results: Clinical findings included DD/ID (17/17) (speech delay in 94% (16/17), fine motor delay in 82% (14/17) and gross motor delay in 71% (12/17) of subjects), autism or autistic traits (13/17), attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (11/17), other behavioural problems (7/17) and musculoskeletal findings (12/17). Other congenital malformations or clinical findings were occasionally documented. The majority of patients exhibited some dysmorphic features but no recognisable gestalt was identified. 17 heterozygous variants were identified in 12 male and five female unrelated subjects by exome sequencing (14), a targeted panel (2) and a chromosomal microarray (1). The variants were nonsense (7), frameshift (5), splice site (2), intragenic deletions (2) and missense (1).

Conclusions: Variants in cause a novel genetic disorder characterised by recurrent neurocognitive and behavioural phenotypes featuring DD/ID, autism, ADHD and other behavioural abnormalities. Our data highly suggest that haploinsufficiency is the most likely pathogenic mechanism. should be added to the growing list of genes of the RNA-induced silencing complex associated with ID/DD, autism and ADHD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jmedgenet-2019-106470DOI Listing
October 2020

Posterior Neocortex-Specific Regulation of Neuronal Migration by CEP85L Identifies Maternal Centriole-Dependent Activation of CDK5.

Neuron 2020 04 24;106(2):246-255.e6. Epub 2020 Feb 24.

Division of Genetics and Genomics and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Pediatrics and Neurology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address:

Genes mutated in human neuronal migration disorders encode tubulin proteins and a variety of tubulin-binding and -regulating proteins, but it is very poorly understood how these proteins function together to coordinate migration. Additionally, the way in which regional differences in neocortical migration are controlled is completely unknown. Here we describe a new syndrome with remarkably region-specific effects on neuronal migration in the posterior cortex, reflecting de novo variants in CEP85L. We show that CEP85L is required cell autonomously in vivo and in vitro for migration, that it localizes to the maternal centriole, and that it forms a complex with many other proteins required for migration, including CDK5, LIS1, NDE1, KIF2A, and DYNC1H1. Loss of CEP85L disrupts CDK5 localization and activation, leading to centrosome disorganization and disrupted microtubule cytoskeleton organization. Together, our findings suggest that CEP85L highlights a complex that controls CDK5 activity to promote neuronal migration.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuron.2020.01.030DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7255387PMC
April 2020

Deficient histone H3 propionylation by BRPF1-KAT6 complexes in neurodevelopmental disorders and cancer.

Sci Adv 2020 01 22;6(4):eaax0021. Epub 2020 Jan 22.

Center for Medical Genetics, Ghent University and Ghent University Hospital, C. Heymanslaan 10, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.

Lysine acetyltransferase 6A (KAT6A) and its paralog KAT6B form stoichiometric complexes with bromodomain- and PHD finger-containing protein 1 (BRPF1) for acetylation of histone H3 at lysine 23 (H3K23). We report that these complexes also catalyze H3K23 propionylation in vitro and in vivo. Immunofluorescence microscopy and ATAC-See revealed the association of this modification with active chromatin. deletion obliterates the acylation in mouse embryos and fibroblasts. Moreover, we identify variants in 12 previously unidentified cases of syndromic intellectual disability and demonstrate that these cases and known variants impair H3K23 propionylation. Cardiac anomalies are present in a subset of the cases. H3K23 acylation is also impaired by cancer-derived somatic mutations. Valproate, vorinostat, propionate and butyrate promote H3K23 acylation. These results reveal the dual functionality of BRPF1-KAT6 complexes, shed light on mechanisms underlying related developmental disorders and various cancers, and suggest mutation-based therapy for medical conditions with deficient histone acylation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.aax0021DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6976298PMC
January 2020

Novel KIAA1033/WASHC4 mutations in three patients with syndromic intellectual disability and a review of the literature.

Am J Med Genet A 2020 04 18;182(4):792-797. Epub 2020 Jan 18.

UMR-Inserm 1231 GAD team, Génétique des Anomalies du développement, Université de Bourgogne Franche-Comté, Dijon, France.

In 2011, KIAA1033/WASHC4 was associated with autosomal recessive intellectual disability (ARID) in a large consanguineous family comprising seven affected individuals with moderate ID and short stature. Since then, no other cases of KIAA1033 variants have been reported. Here we describe three additional patients (from two unrelated families) with syndromic ID due to compound heterozygous KIAA1033 variants ascertained by exome sequencing (ES). Two sisters, aged 4 and 5.5 years, had a stop-gain and a missense variants, each inherited from one parent (p.(Gln442*) and p.(Asp1048Gly)). Both had learning disabilities, macrocephaly, dysmorphic features, skeletal anomalies, and subependymal heterotopic nodules. In addition, the younger sibling had a congenital absence of the right internal carotid and bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. The third patient was aged 34 years and had two missense variants, one inherited from each parent (p.(Lys1079Arg) and p.(His503Arg)). This patient presented with mild ID, short stature, and microcephaly. KIAA1033 encodes a large protein (WASHC4), which is part of the WASH complex. The WASH complex is involved in the regulation of the fission of tubules that serve as transport intermediates during endosome sorting. Another member of the WASH complex, KIAA0196/WASHC5, has already been implicated in ARID with brain and cardiac malformations, under the designation of 3C or Ritscher-Schinzel syndrome (MIM#20210). ES has proved efficient for finding replications of genes with insufficient data in the literature to be defined as new OMIM genes. We conclude that KIAA1033 is responsible for a heterogeneous ARID phenotype, and additional description will be needed to refine the clinical phenotype.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.61487DOI Listing
April 2020

Delineation of a Human Mendelian Disorder of the DNA Demethylation Machinery: TET3 Deficiency.

Am J Hum Genet 2020 02 9;106(2):234-245. Epub 2020 Jan 9.

Division of Evolution & Genomic Sciences, School of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL, UK; Manchester Centre for Genomic Medicine, St Mary's Hospital, Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust, Health Innovation Manchester, Manchester M13 9WL, UK.

Germline pathogenic variants in chromatin-modifying enzymes are a common cause of pediatric developmental disorders. These enzymes catalyze reactions that regulate epigenetic inheritance via histone post-translational modifications and DNA methylation. Cytosine methylation (5-methylcytosine [5mC]) of DNA is the quintessential epigenetic mark, yet no human Mendelian disorder of DNA demethylation has yet been delineated. Here, we describe in detail a Mendelian disorder caused by the disruption of DNA demethylation. TET3 is a methylcytosine dioxygenase that initiates DNA demethylation during early zygote formation, embryogenesis, and neuronal differentiation and is intolerant to haploinsufficiency in mice and humans. We identify and characterize 11 cases of human TET3 deficiency in eight families with the common phenotypic features of intellectual disability and/or global developmental delay; hypotonia; autistic traits; movement disorders; growth abnormalities; and facial dysmorphism. Mono-allelic frameshift and nonsense variants in TET3 occur throughout the coding region. Mono-allelic and bi-allelic missense variants localize to conserved residues; all but one such variant occur within the catalytic domain, and most display hypomorphic function in an assay of catalytic activity. TET3 deficiency and other Mendelian disorders of the epigenetic machinery show substantial phenotypic overlap, including features of intellectual disability and abnormal growth, underscoring shared disease mechanisms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2019.12.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7010978PMC
February 2020
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