Publications by authors named "Kimberly Lally"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Transfusion reactions associated with COVID-19 convalescent plasma therapy for SARS-CoV-2.

Transfusion 2021 01 20;61(1):78-93. Epub 2020 Nov 20.

Department of Pathology, Molecular and Cell-Based Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, USA.

Background: Convalescent plasma (CP) for treatment of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has shown preliminary signs of effectiveness in moderate to severely ill patients in reducing mortality. While studies have demonstrated a low risk of serious adverse events, the comprehensive incidence and nature of the spectrum of transfusion reactions to CP is unknown. We retrospectively examined 427 adult inpatient CP transfusions to determine incidence and types of reactions, as well as clinical parameters and risk factors associated with transfusion reactions.

Study Design And Methods: Retrospective analysis was performed for 427 transfusions to 215 adult patients with coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) within the Mount Sinai Health System, through the US Food and Drug Administration emergency investigational new drug and the Mayo Clinic Expanded Access Protocol to Convalescent Plasma approval pathways. Transfusions were blindly evaluated by two reviewers and adjudicated by a third reviewer in discordant cases. Patient demographics and clinical and laboratory parameters were compared and analyzed.

Results: Fifty-five reactions from 427 transfusions were identified (12.9% incidence), and 13 were attributed to transfusion (3.1% incidence). Reactions were classified as underlying COVID-19 (76%), febrile nonhemolytic (10.9%), transfusion-associated circulatory overload (9.1%), and allergic (1.8%) and hypotensive (1.8%) reactions. Statistical analysis identified increased transfusion reaction risk for ABO blood group B or Sequential Organ Failure Assessment scores of 12 to 13, and decreased risk within the age group of 80 to 89 years.

Conclusion: Our findings support the use of CP as a safe, therapeutic option from a transfusion reaction perspective, in the setting of COVID-19. Further studies are needed to confirm the clinical significance of ABO group B, age, and predisposing disease severity in the incidence of transfusion reaction events.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/trf.16177DOI Listing
January 2021

Anti-SARS-CoV-2 spike antibodies are stable in convalescent plasma when stored at 4° Celsius for at least 6 weeks.

Transfusion 2020 10 23;60(10):2457-2459. Epub 2020 Sep 23.

Department of Pathology, Molecular and Cell-Based Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/trf.16047DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7461441PMC
October 2020

Isohemagglutinin titering performed on an automated solid-phase and hemagglutinin-based analyzer is comparable to results obtained by manual gel testing.

Transfusion 2020 03 20;60(3):628-636. Epub 2020 Jan 20.

Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.

Background: Isohemagglutinins (anti-A and anti-B) mediate hemolytic transfusion reactions, antibody-mediated rejection of solid-organ transplants, and delayed engraftment after stem cell transplant. However, quantification of isohemagglutinins is often labor intensive and operator dependent, limiting availability and interfacility comparisons. We evaluated an automated, solid-phase and agglutination-based antibody titer platform versus manual gel testing.

Study Design And Methods: Plasma samples were obtained from 54 randomly selected patients. Titers were determined by our laboratory's standard assay (manual dilution followed by manual gel testing) and were compared to results obtained on a fully automated blood bank analyzer (Galileo NEO, Immucor). The analyzer determined immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies using solid-phase and immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies by direct hemagglutination.

Results: Isohemagglutinin titers obtained by manual gel versus the automated assay generally (>80%) agreed within one doubling dilution, and always (100%) agreed within two dilutions. Among O samples, the gel titer and the highest titer obtained with the automated assay (either IgG or IgM) were similar in paired, nonparametric analysis (p = 0.06 for anti-A; p = 0.13 for anti-B). Gel titers from group A and group B patients were slightly higher than the highest titer obtained using the automated assay (p = 0.04 for group A; p = 0.009 for group B), although these differences were within the accepted error of measurement.

Conclusion: Manual and automated methodologies yielded similar isohemagglutinin titers. Separate quantification of IgM and IgG isohemagglutinins via automated titration may yield additional insight into hemolysis, graft survival after ABO-incompatible transplantation, and red blood cell engraftment after ABO-incompatible stem cell transplant.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/trf.15671DOI Listing
March 2020

Granular cell tumour in male breast mimicking breast carcinoma.

BMJ Case Rep 2019 Mar 5;12(3). Epub 2019 Mar 5.

Department of Radiology, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Los Angeles, California, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bcr-2018-227805DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6441268PMC
March 2019
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