Publications by authors named "Kimberly A Kasow"

57 Publications

Hematopoietic stem cell transplant referral patterns for children with sickle cell disease vary among pediatric hematologist/oncologists' practice focus: A Sickle Cell Transplant Advocacy and Research Alliance (STAR) study.

Pediatr Blood Cancer 2021 Mar 6;68(3):e28861. Epub 2021 Jan 6.

Department of Pediatrics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Background: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) provides a curative therapy for children severely affected by sickle cell disease (SCD). Rejection-free survival after matched sibling donor (MSD) HSCT is very high, but adoption of HSCT as a curative SCD therapy has been slow. In this study, we assess providers' perceptions about MSD HSCT for children with variable SCD severity, and determine the influence of provider characteristics on HSCT referrals.

Procedure: After our Institutional Review Board deemed the study exempt, American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Clinical Forum listserv subscribers and American Society of Hematology members who self-identified as pediatric hematologists/oncologists (PHO) were emailed a survey. Analysis was performed to describe and evaluate correlations between participant demographics (including practice focus within PHO) and likelihood of HSCT referral for each scenario.

Results: Spearman's rank correlation analysis did not reveal any significant relationship between demographic characteristics except practice focus and likelihood to refer to HSCT for any scenarios. Providers focused on SCD and HSCT were more likely to refer a child who had never been admitted to the hospital or had suboptimal adherence to hydroxyurea than general PHOs. A significantly higher proportion of all respondents would refer a child with β-thalassemia major (87%) than an asymptomatic child with HbSS (47%, P < .00001) or non-HbSS variant (23%, P < .00001).

Conclusion: PSCD and HSCT physicians are more likely to refer for MSD HSCT in almost every condition than general PHO practitioners, likely because of increased awareness of long-term effects of SCD and safety of MSD HSCT for children with SCD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pbc.28861DOI Listing
March 2021

Impact of autologous blood transfusion after bone marrow harvest on unrelated donor's health and outcome: a CIBMTR analysis.

Bone Marrow Transplant 2020 11 30;55(11):2121-2131. Epub 2020 Apr 30.

Division of Hematology & Oncology, Department of Medicine, Shands HealthCare & University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.

Pre-harvest autologous blood collection from bone marrow (BM) donors is performed to meet potential post-operative transfusion needs. This study examines the impact of autologous blood transfusion on BM donor's health and safety. The study included first-time unrelated BM donors from the United States whose BM harvest was facilitated by the National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP) centers between 2006 and 2017. Examination of 7024 BM donors revealed that 60% received at least one unit of autologous blood. The donors who received autologous blood were older, had lower hemoglobin pre-harvest, underwent longer duration of anesthesia, and higher volume BM harvest. Only donors who underwent high-volume BM harvest, defined as a BM harvest volume >27% of donor's blood volume, benefited from autologous transfusion. After a high-volume BM harvest, autologous blood transfusion was shown to decrease grade 2 to 4 collection-associated toxicities within 48 h of BM donation (p = 0.010) and shorten the time to donor-reported "complete" recovery from donation-associated symptoms (p < 0.001). Therefore, autologous transfusion could be avoided as support of marrow donation in the majority of unrelated BM donors and should be limited to cases where the planned BM harvest volume is expected to exceed 27% of donor's blood volume.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41409-020-0911-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7606543PMC
November 2020

Late effects after ablative allogeneic stem cell transplantation for adolescent and young adult acute myeloid leukemia.

Blood Adv 2020 03;4(6):983-992

Division of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Stanford University, Stanford, CA.

There is marked paucity of data regarding late effects in adolescents and young adults (AYAs) who undergo myeloablative conditioning (MAC) allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We evaluated late effects and survival in 826 1-year disease-free survivors of MAC HCT for AYA AML, with an additional focus on comparing late effects based upon MAC type (total body irradiation [TBI] vs high-dose chemotherapy only). The estimated 10-year cumulative incidence of subsequent neoplasms was 4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 2%-6%); 10-year cumulative incidence of nonmalignant late effects included gonadal dysfunction (10%; 95% CI, 8%-13%), cataracts (10%; 95% CI, 7%-13%), avascular necrosis (8%; 95% CI, 5%-10%), diabetes mellitus (5%; 95% CI, 3%-7%), and hypothyroidism (3%; 95% CI, 2%-5%). Receipt of TBI was independently associated with a higher risk of cataracts only (hazard ratio [HR], 4.98; P < .0001) whereas chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) was associated with an increased risk of cataracts (HR, 3.22; P = .0006), avascular necrosis (HR, 2.49; P = .006), and diabetes mellitus (HR, 3.36; P = .03). Estimated 10-year overall survival and leukemia-free survival were 73% and 70%, respectively, and did not differ on the basis of conditioning type. In conclusion, late effects among survivors of MAC HCT for AYA AML are frequent and are more closely linked to cGVHD than type of conditioning.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/bloodadvances.2019001126DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7094022PMC
March 2020

Weighty choices: selecting optimal G-CSF doses for stem cell mobilization to optimize yield.

Blood Adv 2020 02;4(4):706-716

Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Medicine, Shands HealthCare and University of Florida, Gainesville, FL.

There are limited data on the effect of donor body mass index (BMI) on peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) mobilization response to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), especially in unrelated donors. Obesity has been associated with persistent leukocytosis, elevated circulating progenitor cells, and enhanced stem cell mobilization. Therefore, we hypothesized that adequate collection of CD34+ cells may be achieved with lower doses (per kilogram of body weight) of G-CSF in donors with higher BMI compared with donors with lower BMI. Using the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research database, we evaluated the impact of donor BMI on G-CSF-mobilized PBSC yield in healthy unrelated donors. We examined 20 884 PBSC donations collected at National Marrow Donor Program centers between 2006 and 2016. We found significantly higher collection yields in obese and severely obese donors compared with normal and overweight donors. An increase in average daily G-CSF dose was associated with an increase in stem cell yield in donors with normal or overweight BMI. In contrast, an increase in average daily G-CSF dose beyond 780 μg per day in obese and 900 μg per day in severely obese donors did not increase cell yield. Pain and toxicities were assessed at baseline, during G-CSF administration, and postcollection. Obesity was associated with higher levels of self-reported donation-related pain and toxicities in the pericollection and early postdonation recovery periods. This study suggests a maximum effective G-CSF dose for PBSC mobilization in obese and severely obese donors, beyond which higher doses of G-CSF add no increased yield.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/bloodadvances.2019000923DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7042992PMC
February 2020

Collection of Peripheral Blood Progenitor Cells in 1 Day Is Associated with Decreased Donor Toxicity Compared to 2 Days in Unrelated Donors.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2020 06 20;26(6):1210-1217. Epub 2020 Feb 20.

Division of Hematology and Oncology, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.

Peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) have been increasingly used for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation instead of bone marrow stem cells. Current National Marrow Donor Program policy recommends 5 days of daily filgrastim, followed by either 1 or 2 days of apheresis for unrelated donors, depending on collection center choice. To date, there are no published studies comparing the differences in donor experience between 1 day and 2 days of apheresis. We examined 22,348 adult unrelated donor collections in 184 centers between 2006 and 2016. Of these 22,348 donors, 20,004 (89.5%) had collection on 1 day, and the other 2344 (9.5%) had collection over 2 days. Information on why donors underwent apheresis in 1 day or 2 days was not available. Donors who underwent apheresis in 1 day were more likely to be male (67% versus 46%; P < .001), younger (age <30 years, 48% versus 36%; P < .001), and have a higher body weight (83.0 kg versus 75.9 kg; P< .001) and body mass index (BMI; >30, 30% versus 22%; P < .001). Successful collection of the requested CD34 cell count was achieved on the first day in 82% of 1-day collections and in 16% of 2-day collections. Despite not administering filgrastim the evening after the first day of collection in patients who underwent 2 days of apheresis, the median concentration of CD34 cells/L in the product was higher on the second day of apheresis compared with the first day (23.8 × 10 CD34/L on day 1 versus 28.7 × 10 CD34/L on day 2; P< .001). Donors who underwent collection in 1 day were less likely to experience citrate toxicity (36% versus 52%; P< .001), hospitalization (1% versus 6%; P< .001), and other side effects related to apheresis (Modified Toxicity Criteria incidence: 20% versus 26%; P < .001). Female sex, older age, collection via central lines, and higher BMI were factors associated with greater likelihood for the development of toxicity, whereas less toxicity was noted in those with higher CD34 counts and more blood processed on the first day of collection. We conclude that although unrelated donors can be successfully collected in 1 day or 2 days, 1-day apheresis procedures were associated with less overall toxicity, and thus we recommend single-day collections, especially if the requested number of cells have been collected in 1 day.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2020.02.011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7347029PMC
June 2020

Immune profile differences between chronic GVHD and late acute GVHD: results of the ABLE/PBMTC 1202 studies.

Blood 2020 04;135(15):1287-1298

CancerCare Manitoba, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.

Human graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) biology beyond 3 months after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is complex. The Applied Biomarker in Late Effects of Childhood Cancer study (ABLE/PBMTC1202, NCT02067832) evaluated the immune profiles in chronic GVHD (cGVHD) and late acute GVHD (L-aGVHD). Peripheral blood immune cell and plasma markers were analyzed at day 100 post-HSCT and correlated with GVHD diagnosed according to the National Institutes of Health consensus criteria (NIH-CC) for cGVHD. Of 302 children enrolled, 241 were evaluable as L-aGVHD, cGVHD, active L-aGVHD or cGVHD, and no cGVHD/L-aGVHD. Significant marker differences, adjusted for major clinical factors, were defined as meeting all 3 criteria: receiver-operating characteristic area under the curve ≥0.60, P ≤ .05, and effect ratio ≥1.3 or ≤0.75. Patients with only distinctive features but determined as cGVHD by the adjudication committee (non-NIH-CC) had immune profiles similar to NIH-CC. Both cGVHD and L-aGVHD had decreased transitional B cells and increased cytolytic natural killer (NK) cells. cGVHD had additional abnormalities, with increased activated T cells, naive helper T (Th) and cytotoxic T cells, loss of CD56bright regulatory NK cells, and increased ST2 and soluble CD13. Active L-aGVHD before day 114 had additional abnormalities in naive Th, naive regulatory T (Treg) cell populations, and cytokines, and active cGVHD had an increase in PD-1- and a decrease in PD-1+ memory Treg cells. Unsupervised analysis appeared to show a progression of immune abnormalities from no cGVHD/L-aGVHD to L-aGVHD, with the most complex pattern in cGVHD. Comprehensive immune profiling will allow us to better understand how to minimize L-aGVHD and cGVHD. Further confirmation in adult and pediatric cohorts is needed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood.2019003186DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7146024PMC
April 2020

Choice of conditioning regimens for bone marrow transplantation in severe aplastic anemia.

Blood Adv 2019 10;3(20):3123-3131

Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research, Department of Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI.

Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is curative therapy for the treatment of patients with severe aplastic anemia (SAA). However, several conditioning regimens can be used for BMT. We evaluated transplant conditioning regimens for BMT in SAA after HLA-matched sibling and unrelated donor BMT. For recipients of HLA-matched sibling donor transplantation (n = 955), fludarabine (Flu)/cyclophosphamide (Cy)/antithymocyte globulin (ATG) or Cy/ATG led to the best survival. The 5-year probabilities of survival with Flu/Cy/ATG, Cy/ATG, Cy ± Flu, and busulfan/Cy were 91%, 91%, 80%, and 84%, respectively (P = .001). For recipients of 8/8 and 7/8 HLA allele-matched unrelated donor transplantation (n = 409), there were no differences in survival between regimens. The 5-year probabilities of survival with Cy/ATG/total body irradiation 200 cGy, Flu/Cy/ATG/total body irradiation 200 cGy, Flu/Cy/ATG, and Cy/ATG were 77%, 80%, 75%, and 72%, respectively (P = .61). Rabbit-derived ATG compared with equine-derived ATG was associated with a lower risk of grade II to IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) (hazard ratio [HR], 0.39; P < .001) but not chronic GVHD. Independent of conditioning regimen, survival was lower in patients aged >30 years after HLA-matched sibling (HR, 2.74; P < .001) or unrelated donor (HR, 1.98; P = .001) transplantation. These data support Flu/Cy/ATG and Cy/ATG as optimal regimens for HLA-matched sibling BMT. Although survival after an unrelated donor BMT did not differ between regimens, use of rabbit-derived ATG may be preferred because of lower risks of acute GVHD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/bloodadvances.2019000722DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6849938PMC
October 2019

Current and Future Cell Therapy Standards and Guidelines.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2019 10 30;33(5):839-855. Epub 2019 Jul 30.

Department of Pediatrics, University of North Carolina, 1108 Physicians Office Building, 170 Manning, Drive, CB 7236, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7236, USA.

Cell biology researchers, cellular engineers, and clinicians are teaming together to create powerful drugs. The use of cell-derived products as biologics is rapidly advancing. These human cell-based products have great potential for treating serious conditions but may have unidentified risks. Manipulations, expansions, and gene modifications increase the risks of unexpected outcomes. Implementation of the 21st Century Cures Act is opening avenues for accelerated approvals of these drugs for use in clinical trials and licensure. Although overwhelming, collaboration between regulators, industry, and research and medical communities enables the field to safely meet the needs of critically ill patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2019.05.008DOI Listing
October 2019

Benefits and challenges with diagnosing chronic and late acute GVHD in children using the NIH consensus criteria.

Blood 2019 07 1;134(3):304-316. Epub 2019 May 1.

British Columbia Children's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) and late acute graft-versus-host disease (L-aGVHD) are understudied complications of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children. The National Institutes of Health Consensus Criteria (NIH-CC) were designed to improve the diagnostic accuracy of cGVHD and to better classify graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) syndromes but have not been validated in patients <18 years of age. The objectives of this prospective multi-institution study were to determine: (1) whether the NIH-CC could be used to diagnose pediatric cGVHD and whether the criteria operationalize well in a multi-institution study; (2) the frequency of cGVHD and L-aGVHD in children using the NIH-CC; and (3) the clinical features and risk factors for cGVHD and L-aGVHD using the NIH-CC. Twenty-seven transplant centers enrolled 302 patients <18 years of age before conditioning and prospectively followed them for 1 year posttransplant for development of cGVHD. Centers justified their cGVHD diagnosis according to the NIH-CC using central review and a study adjudication committee. A total of 28.2% of reported cGVHD cases was reclassified, usually as L-aGVHD, following study committee review. Similar incidence of cGVHD and L-aGVHD was found (21% and 24.7%, respectively). The most common organs involved with diagnostic or distinctive manifestations of cGVHD in children include the mouth, skin, eyes, and lungs. Importantly, the 2014 NIH-CC for bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome perform poorly in children. Past acute GVHD and peripheral blood grafts are major risk factors for cGVHD and L-aGVHD, with recipients ≥12 years of age being at risk for cGVHD. Applying the NIH-CC in pediatrics is feasible and reliable; however, further refinement of the criteria specifically for children is needed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood.2019000216DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6911839PMC
July 2019

The Concentration of Total Nucleated Cells in Harvested Bone Marrow for Transplantation Has Decreased over Time.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2019 07 2;25(7):1325-1330. Epub 2019 Feb 2.

Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research, Department of Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Electronic address:

Bone marrow (BM) is an essential source of hematopoietic stem cell grafts for many allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients, including adult patients (for specific diseases and transplantation strategies) and the majority of pediatric recipient. However, since the advent of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) grafts, there has been a significant decrease in the use of BM in HCT, thought to be due mainly to the increased logistical challenges in harvesting BM compared with PBSCs, as well as generally no significant survival advantage of BM over PBSCs. The decreased frequency of collection has the potential to impact the quality of BM harvests. In this study, we examined >15,000 BM donations collected at National Marrow Donor Program centers between 1994 and 2016 and found a significant decline in the quality of BM products, as defined by the concentration of total nucleated cells (TNCs). The mean TNC concentration in BM donations dropped from 21.8 × 10 cells/mL in the earliest era (1994 to 1996) to 18.7 × 10 cells/mL in the most recent era (2012 to 2016) (means ratio, .83; P < .001). This decline in BM quality was seen despite the selection of more donors perceived to be optimal (eg, younger and male). Multivariate regression analysis showed that higher-volume centers (performing >30 collections per era) had better-quality harvests with higher concentrations of TNCs collected. In conclusion, we have identified a significant decrease in the quality of BM collections over time, and lower-volume collection centers had poorer-quality harvests. In this analysis, we could not elucidate the direct cause for this finding, suggesting the need for further studies to investigate the key factors responsible and to explore the impact on transplant recipients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2019.01.034DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6615955PMC
July 2019

Higher Risks of Toxicity and Incomplete Recovery in 13- to 17-Year-Old Females after Marrow Donation: RDSafe Peds Results.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2019 05 31;25(5):955-964. Epub 2018 Dec 31.

Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Although donation of bone marrow (BM) or peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) from children to family members undergoing allogeneic transplantation are well-established procedures, studies detailing levels of pain, symptoms, and long-term recovery are lacking. To address this lack, we prospectively enrolled 294 donors age <18 years at 25 pediatric transplantation centers in North America, assessing them predonation, peridonation, and at 1 month, 6 months, and 1 year postdonation. We noted that 71% of children reported pain and 59% reported other symptoms peridonation, with resolution to 14% and 12% at 1 month postdonation. Both older age (age 13 to 17 years versus younger) and female sex were associated with higher levels of pain peridonation, with the highest rates in older females (57% with grade 2-4 pain and 17% with grade 3-4 pain). Multivariate analyses showed a 4-fold increase in risk for older females compared with males age <13 years (P <.001). At 1 year, 11% of 13- to 17-year-old females reported grade 2-4 pain, compared with 3% of males age 13 to 17 years, 0% of females age <13 years, and 1% of males age <13 years (P = .01). Males and females age 13 to 17 years failed to return to predonation pain levels at 1 year 22% and 23% of the time, respectively, compared with 3% and 10% in males and females age <13 years (P = .002). Our data show that females age 13 to 17 years are at increased risk of grade 2-4 pain at 1 year and >20% of females and males age 13 to 17 years do not return to baseline pain levels by 1 year after BM donation. Studies aimed at decreasing symptoms and improving recovery in older children are warranted.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2018.12.765DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6511296PMC
May 2019

Effect of Aging and Predonation Comorbidities on the Related Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Donor Experience: Report from the Related Donor Safety Study.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2019 04 10;25(4):699-711. Epub 2018 Nov 10.

Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research, Minneapolis, Minnesota; National Marrow Donor Program/Be the Match, Minneapolis, Minnesota.

The development of reduced-intensity approaches for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation has resulted in growing numbers of older related donors (RDs) of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs). The effects of age on donation efficacy, toxicity, and long-term recovery in RDs are poorly understood. To address this we analyzed hematologic variables, pain, donation-related symptoms, and recovery in 1211 PBSC RDs aged 18 to 79 enrolled in the Related Donor Safety Study. RDs aged > 60 had a lower median CD34 level before apheresis compared with younger RDs (age > 60, 59 × 10/L; age 41 to 60, 81 × 10/L; age 18 to 40, 121 × 10/L; P < .001). This resulted in older donors undergoing more apheresis procedures (49% versus 30% ≥ 2 collections, P < .001) and higher collection volumes (52% versus 32% > 24 L, P < .001), leading to high percentages of donors aged > 60 with postcollection thrombocytopenia <50 × 10/L (26% and 57% after 2 and 3days of collection, respectively). RDs aged 18 to 40 had a higher risk of grades 2 to 4 pain and symptoms pericollection, but donors over age 40 had more persistent pain at 1, 6, and 12 months (odds ratio [OR], 1.7; P = 0.02) and a higher rate of nonrecovery to predonation levels (OR, 1.7; P = .01). Donors reporting comorbidities increased significantly with age, and those with comorbidities that would have led to deferral by National Marrow Donor Program unrelated donor standards had an increased risk for persistent grades 2 to 4 pain (OR, 2.41; P < .001) and failure to recover to predonation baseline for other symptoms (OR, 2.34; P = .004). This information should be used in counseling RDs regarding risk and can assist in developing practice approaches aimed at improving the RD experience for high-risk individuals.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2018.11.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6453753PMC
April 2019

Related peripheral blood stem cell donors experience more severe symptoms and less complete recovery at one year compared to unrelated donors.

Haematologica 2019 04 31;104(4):844-854. Epub 2018 Oct 31.

Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI.

Unlike unrelated donor registries, transplant centers lack uniform approaches to related donor assessment and deferral. To test whether related donors are at increased risk for donation-related toxicities, we conducted a prospective observational trial of 11,942 related and unrelated donors aged 18-60 years. Bone marrow (BM) was collected at 37 transplant and 78 National Marrow Donor Program centers, and peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) were collected at 42 transplant and 87 unrelated donor centers in North America. Possible presence of medical comorbidities was verified prior to donation, and standardized pain and toxicity measures were assessed pre-donation, peri-donation, and one year following. Multivariate analyses showed similar experiences for BM collection in related and unrelated donors; however, related stem cell donors had increased risk of moderate [odds ratios (ORs) 1.42; <0.001] and severe (OR 8.91; <0.001) pain and toxicities (OR 1.84; <0.001) with collection. Related stem cell donors were at increased risk of persistent toxicities (OR 1.56; =0.021) and non-recovery from pain (OR 1.42; =0.001) at one year. Related donors with more significant comorbidities were at especially high risk for grade 2-4 pain (OR 3.43; <0.001) and non-recovery from toxicities (OR 3.71; <0.001) at one year. Related donors with more significant comorbidities were at especially high risk for grade 2-4 pain (OR 3.43; <0.001) and non-recovery from toxicities (OR 3.71; <0.001) at one year. Related donors reporting grade ≥2 pain had significant decreases in Health-Related Quality of Life (HR-QoL) scores at one month and one year post donation (=0.004). In conclusion, related PBSC donors with comorbidities are at increased risk for pain, toxicity, and non-recovery at one year after donation. Risk profiles described in this study should be used for donor education, planning studies to improve the related donor experience, and decisions regarding donor deferral. Registered at .
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3324/haematol.2018.200121DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6442962PMC
April 2019

Characteristics of Late Fatal Infections after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2019 02 2;25(2):362-368. Epub 2018 Oct 2.

Division of Hematology/Oncology, University Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida.

We analyzed late fatal infections (LFIs) in allogeneic stem cell transplantation (HCT) recipients reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research. We analyzed the incidence, infection types, and risk factors contributing to LFI in 10,336 adult and 5088 pediatric subjects surviving for ≥2 years after first HCT without relapse. Among 2245 adult and 377 pediatric patients who died, infections were a primary or contributory cause of death in 687 (31%) and 110 (29%), respectively. At 12 years post-HCT, the cumulative incidence of LFIs was 6.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.8% to 7.0%) in adults, compared with 1.8% (95% CI, 1.4% to 2.3%) in pediatric subjects; P < .001). In adults, the 2 most significant risks for developing LFI were increasing age (20 to 39, 40 to 54, and ≥55 years versus 18 to 19 years) with hazard ratios (HRs) of 3.12 (95% CI, 1.33 to 7.32), 3.86 (95% CI, 1.66 to 8.95), and 5.49 (95% CI, 2.32 to 12.99) and a history of chronic graft-versus-host disease GVHD (cGVHD) with ongoing immunosuppression at 2 years post-HCT compared with no history of GVHD with (HR, 3.87; 95% CI, 2.59 to 5.78). In pediatric subjects, the 3 most significant risks for developing LFI were a history of cGVHD with ongoing immunosuppression (HR, 9.49; 95% CI, 4.39 to 20.51) or without ongoing immunosuppression (HR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.05 to 7.43) at 2 years post-HCT compared with no history of GVHD, diagnosis of inherited abnormalities of erythrocyte function compared with diagnosis of acute myelogenous leukemia (HR, 2.30; 95% CI, 1.19 to 4.42), and age >10 years (HR, 1.92; 95% CI, 1.15 to 3.2). This study emphasizes the importance of continued vigilance for late infections after HCT and institution of support strategies aimed at decreasing the risk of cGVHD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2018.09.031DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6339825PMC
February 2019

Risk of acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome after autotransplants for lymphomas and plasma cell myeloma.

Leuk Res 2018 11 19;74:130-136. Epub 2018 Jul 19.

Department of Oncology, King Faisal Specialist Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

Background: Exposures to DNA-damaging drugs and ionizing radiations increase risks of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS).

Methods: 9028 recipients of hematopoietic cell autotransplants (1995-2010) for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL; n = 916), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL; n = 3546) and plasma cell myeloma (PCM; n = 4566), reported to the CIBMTR, were analyzed for risk of subsequent AML or MDS.

Results: 335 MDS/AML cases were diagnosed posttransplant (3.7%). Variables associated with an increased risk for AML or MDS in multivariate analyses were: (1) conditioning with total body radiation versus chemotherapy alone for HL (HR = 4.0; 95% confidence interval [1.4, 11.6]) and NHL (HR = 2.5 [1.1, 2.5]); (2) ≥3 versus 1 line of chemotherapy for NHL (HR = 1.9 [1.3, 2.8]); and (3) subjects with NHL transplanted in 2005-2010 versus 1995-1999 (HR = 2.1 [1.5, 3.1]). Using Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) data, we found risks for AML/MDS in HL, NHL and PCM to be 5-10 times the background rate. In contrast, relative risks were 10-50 for AML and approximately 100 for MDS in the autotransplant cohort.

Conclusions: There are substantial risks of AML and MDS after autotransplants for HL, NHL and PCM.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.leukres.2018.07.016DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6219911PMC
November 2018

Outcomes of Measurable Residual Disease in Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia before and after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant: Validation of Difference from Normal Flow Cytometry with Chimerism Studies and Wilms Tumor 1 Gene Expression.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2018 10 19;24(10):2040-2046. Epub 2018 Jun 19.

Division of Hematology, Oncology, and Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, USC Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

We enrolled 150 patients in a prospective multicenter study of children with acute myeloid leukemia undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) to compare the detection of measurable residual disease (MRD) by a "difference from normal" flow cytometry (ΔN) approach with assessment of Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) gene expression without access to the diagnostic specimen. Prospective analysis of the specimens using this approach showed that 23% of patients screened for HSCT had detectable residual disease by ΔN (.04% to 53%). Of those patients who proceeded to transplant as being in morphologic remission, 10 had detectable disease (.04% to 14%) by ΔN. The disease-free survival of this group was 10% (0 to 35%) compared with 55% (46% to 64%, P < .001) for those without disease. The ΔN assay was validated using the post-HSCT specimen by sorting abnormal or suspicious cells to confirm recipient or donor origin by chimerism studies. All 15 patients who had confirmation of tumor detection relapsed, whereas the 2 patients with suspicious phenotype cells lacking this confirmation did not. The phenotype of the relapse specimen was then used retrospectively to assess the pre-HSCT specimen, allowing identification of additional samples with low levels of MRD involvement that were previously undetected. Quantitative assessment of WT1 gene expression was not predictive of relapse or other outcomes in either pre- or post-transplant specimens. MRD detected by ΔN was highly specific, but did not identify most relapsing patients. The application of the assay was limited by poor quality among one-third of the specimens and lack of a diagnostic phenotype for comparison.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2018.06.010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6239928PMC
October 2018

Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infection Due to Contaminated Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Graft.

Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2018 03 23;39(3):367-369. Epub 2018 Jan 23.

2Hospital Epidemiology,University of North Carolina Hospitals, and Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina,Chapel Hill,North Carolina.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/ice.2017.285DOI Listing
March 2018

Long-term outcomes among 2-year survivors of autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation for Hodgkin and diffuse large b-cell lymphoma.

Cancer 2018 02 10;124(4):816-825. Epub 2017 Nov 10.

Division of Pediatric Hematology, Oncology, and Stem Cell Transplantation, Department of Pediatrics, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York.

Background: Autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (auto-HCT) is a standard therapy for relapsed classic Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL); however, long-term outcomes are not well described.

Methods: This study analyzed survival, nonrelapse mortality, late effects, and subsequent malignant neoplasms (SMNs) in 1617 patients who survived progression-free for ≥2 years after auto-HCT for cHL or DLBCL between 1990 and 2008. The median age at auto-HCT was 40 years; the median follow-up was 10.6 years.

Results: The 5-year overall survival rate was 90% (95% confidence interval [CI], 87%-92%) for patients with cHL and 89% (95% CI, 87%-91%) for patients with DLBCL. The risk of late mortality in comparison with the general population was 9.6-fold higher for patients with cHL (standardized mortality ratio [SMR], 9.6) and 3.4-fold higher for patients with DLBCL (SMR, 3.4). Relapse accounted for 44% of late deaths. At least 1 late effect was reported for 9% of the patients. A total of 105 SMNs were confirmed: 44 in the cHL group and 61 in the DLBCL group. According to a multivariate analysis, older age, male sex, a Karnofsky score < 90, total body irradiation (TBI) exposure, and a higher number of lines of chemotherapy before auto-HCT were risk factors for overall mortality in cHL. Risk factors in DLBCL were older age and TBI exposure. A subanalysis of 798 adolescent and young adult patients mirrored the outcomes of the overall study population.

Conclusions: Despite generally favorable outcomes, 2-year survivors of auto-HCT for cHL or DLBCL have an excess late-mortality risk in comparison with the general population and experience an assortment of late complications. Cancer 2018;124:816-25. © 2017 American Cancer Society.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cncr.31114DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5871233PMC
February 2018

Survival and Late Effects after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Hematologic Malignancy at Less than Three Years of Age.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2017 Aug 28;23(8):1327-1334. Epub 2017 Apr 28.

Department of Pediatric Oncology, Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, Boston, Massachusetts.

Very young children undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) are a unique and vulnerable population. We analyzed outcomes of 717 patients from 117 centers who survived relapse free for ≥1 year after allogeneic myeloablative HCT for hematologic malignancy at <3 years of age, between 1987 and 2012. The median follow-up was 8.3 years (range, 1.0 to 26.4 years); median age at follow-up was 9 years (range, 2 to 29 years). Ten-year overall and relapse-free survival were 87% (95% confidence interval [CI], 85% to 90%) and 84% (95% CI, 81% to 87%). Ten-year cumulative incidence of relapse was 11% (95% CI, 9% to 13%). Of 84 deaths, relapse was the leading cause (43%). Chronic graft-versus-host-disease 1 year after HCT was associated with increased risk of mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 2.1; 95% CI, 1.3 to 3.3; P = .0018). Thirty percent of patients experienced ≥1 organ toxicity/late effect >1 year after HCT. The most frequent late effects included growth hormone deficiency/growth disturbance (10-year cumulative incidence, 23%; 95% CI, 19% to 28%), cataracts (18%; 95% CI, 15% to 22%), hypothyroidism (13%; 95% CI, 10% to 16%), gonadal dysfunction/infertility requiring hormone replacement (3%; 95% CI, 2% to 5%), and stroke/seizure (3%; 95% CI, 2% to 5%). Subsequent malignancy was reported in 3.6%. In multivariable analysis, total body irradiation (TBI) was predictive of increased risk of cataracts (HR, 17.2; 95% CI, 7.4 to 39.8; P < .001), growth deficiency (HR, 3.5; 95% CI, 2.2 to 5.5; P < .001), and hypothyroidism (HR, 5.3; 95% CI, 3.0 to 9.4; P < .001). In summary, those who survived relapse free ≥1 year after HCT for hematologic malignancy at <3 years of age had favorable overall survival. Chronic graft-versus-host-disease and TBI were associated with adverse outcomes. Future efforts should focus on reducing the risk of relapse and late effects after HCT at early age.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2017.04.017DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5666571PMC
August 2017

Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Activity in Pediatric Cancer between 2008 and 2014 in the United States: A Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research Report.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2017 Aug 24;23(8):1342-1349. Epub 2017 Apr 24.

Division of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Immune Deficiency, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio.

This Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research report describes the use of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in pediatric patients with cancer, 4408 undergoing allogeneic (allo) and3076 undergoing autologous (auto) HSCT in the United States between 2008 and 2014. In both settings, there was a greater proportion of boys (n = 4327; 57%), children < 10 years of age (n = 4412; 59%), whites (n = 5787; 77%), and children with a performance score ≥ 90% at HSCT (n = 6187; 83%). Leukemia was the most common indication for an allo-transplant (n = 4170; 94%), and among these, acute lymphoblastic leukemia in second complete remission (n = 829; 20%) and acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission (n = 800; 19%) werethe most common. The most frequently used donor relation, stem cell sources, and HLA match were unrelated donor (n = 2933; 67%), bone marrow (n = 2378; 54%), and matched at 8/8 HLA antigens (n = 1098; 37%) respectively. Most allo-transplants used myeloablative conditioning (n = 4070; 92%) and calcineurin inhibitors and methotrexate (n = 2245; 51%) for acute graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis. Neuroblastoma was the most common primary neoplasm for an auto-transplant (n = 1338; 44%). Tandem auto-transplants for neuroblastoma declined after 2012 (40% in 2011, 25% in 2012, and 8% in 2014), whereas tandem auto-transplants increased for brain tumors (57% in 2008 and 77% in 2014). Allo-transplants from relatives other than HLA-identical siblings doubled between 2008 and 2014 (3% in 2008 and 6% in 2014). These trends will be monitored in future reports of transplant practices in the United States.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2017.04.018DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5669065PMC
August 2017

A trial of unrelated donor marrow transplantation for children with severe sickle cell disease.

Blood 2016 11 13;128(21):2561-2567. Epub 2016 Sep 13.

AABB Center for Cellular Therapies, Bethesda, MD.

Children with sickle cell disease experience organ damage, impaired quality of life, and premature mortality. Allogeneic bone marrow transplant from an HLA-matched sibling can halt disease progression but is limited by donor availability. A Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network (BMT CTN) phase 2 trial conducted from 2008 to 2014 enrolled 30 children aged 4 to 19 years; 29 were eligible for evaluation. The primary objective was 1-year event-free survival (EFS) after HLA allele-matched (at HLA-A, -B, -C, and -DRB1 loci) unrelated donor transplant. The conditioning regimen included alemtuzumab, fludarabine, and melphalan. Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis included calcineurin inhibitor, short-course methotrexate, and methylprednisolone. Transplant indications included stroke (n = 12), transcranial Doppler velocity >200 cm/s (n = 2), ≥3 vaso-occlusive pain crises per year (n = 12), or ≥2 acute chest syndrome episodes (n = 4) in the 2 years preceding enrollment. Median follow-up was 26 months (range, 12-62 months); graft rejection was 10%. The 1- and 2-year EFS rates were 76% and 69%, respectively. The corresponding rates for overall survival were 86% and 79%. The day 100 incidence rate of grade II-IV acute GVHD was 28%, and the 1-year incidence rate of chronic GVHD was 62%; 38% classified as extensive. There were 7 GVHD-related deaths. A 34% incidence of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome was noted in the first 6 months. Although the 1-year EFS met the prespecified target of ≥75%, this regimen cannot be considered sufficiently safe for widespread adoption without modifications to achieve more effective GVHD prophylaxis. The BMT CTN #0601 trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00745420.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood-2016-05-715870DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5123194PMC
November 2016

Long-Term Follow-Up after Reduced-Intensity Conditioning and Stem Cell Transplantation for Childhood Nonmalignant Disorders.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2016 08 6;22(8):1467-1472. Epub 2016 May 6.

Division of Pediatric Hematology Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri. Electronic address:

Reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) in children could result in fewer complications during follow-up compared with myeloablative regimens. Hence, many RIC regimens are under investigation, but long-term follow-up is essential. We describe late follow-up beyond 2 years post-HCT in 43 children with nonmalignant disorders who underwent related or unrelated donor (56%) HCT on a multicenter study using a RIC regimen (alemtuzumab, fludarabine, and melphalan) followed by bone marrow (n = 30), peripheral blood (n = 3), or umbilical cord blood (n = 10) HCT for immune dysfunction, bone marrow failure, metabolic disorders, or hemoglobinopathy. Recipients (median age, 7.5 years; range, 3 to 26) underwent HCT 2 to 8 years (median, 3.1 years) before this report. Full donor (67%) or stable mixed chimerism (33%) was noted without late graft rejection. Five patients (12%) required systemic immunosuppression therapy (IST) beyond 2 years post-HCT for graft-versus-host disease (GVHD); 2 patients died 38 and 79 months later, whereas the others improved, enabling an IST wean. Overall, 17 complications were documented in 10 patients (23%). Complications not related to GVHD included hypothyroidism (n = 2), low grade neoplasms (n = 2), and delayed puberty (n = 1). One patient with GVHD had ovarian failure; all other postpubertal females resumed normal ovarian function. Twenty-seven of 28 school-age recipients were functioning at grade level. RIC HCT recipients thus had few regimen-related toxicities during long-term follow-up. However, objective long-term follow-up is still necessary to identify complications so timely intervention may be planned.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2016.04.025DOI Listing
August 2016

Significant Improvements in the Practice Patterns of Adult Related Donor Care in US Transplantation Centers.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2016 Mar 18;22(3):520-7. Epub 2015 Nov 18.

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA.

Recent investigations have found a higher incidence of adverse events associated with hematopoietic cell donation in related donors (RDs) who have morbidities that if present in an unrelated donor (UD) would preclude donation. In the UD setting, regulatory standards ensure independent assessment of donors, one of several crucial measures to safeguard donor health and safety. A survey conducted by the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) Donor Health and Safety Working Committee in 2007 reported a potential conflict of interest in >70% of US centers, where physicians had simultaneous responsibility for RDs and their recipients. Consequently, several international organizations have endeavored to improve practice through regulations and consensus recommendations. We hypothesized that the changes in the 2012 Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy and the Joint Accreditation Committee-International Society for Cellular Therapy and European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation standards resulting from the CIBMTR study would have significantly impacted practice. Accordingly, we conducted a follow-up survey of US transplantation centers to assess practice changes since 2007, and to investigate additional areas where RD care was predicted to differ from UD care. A total of 73 centers (53%), performing 79% of RD transplantations in the United States, responded. Significant improvements were observed since the earlier survey; 62% centers now ensure separation of RD and recipient care (P < .0001). This study identifies several areas where RD management does not meet international donor care standards, however. Particular concerns include counseling and assessment of donors before HLA typing, with 61% centers first disclosing donor HLA results to an individual other than the donor, the use of unlicensed mobilization agents, and the absence of long-term donor follow-up. Recommendations for improvement are made.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2015.11.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4760616PMC
March 2016

Sequential renal and bone marrow transplants in a child with Fanconi anemia.

Pediatr Transplant 2016 Feb 19;20(1):146-50. Epub 2015 Oct 19.

Department of Pediatrics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.

FA is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by small stature and renal abnormalities. FA can lead to progressive bone marrow failure, myelodysplastic syndrome, or acute leukemia. Using a multidisciplinary team approach, we managed a 3-yr-old boy with FA who simultaneously developed renal and hematopoietic failure. Because renal function was insufficient to support the conditioning regimen for HCT, we performed a deceased donor renal transplant in December 2012 prior to HCT with the known risk of graft-versus-graft rejection of the donor kidney. Seven months later he underwent allogeneic HCT. He obtained myeloid engraftment on day +11 and peripheral blood chimerism demonstrated all donor by day +21. He developed asymptomatic CMV reactivation and despite antirejection medications, mild skin graft-versus-host disease. He has maintained excellent renal function and remains transfusion independent with full hematopoietic recovery. He has not experienced any renal rejection episodes nor developed donor-specific antibodies toward his renal donor. Peripheral blood chimerism remains completely HCT donor. He is clinically well, now greater than two and a half yr after renal transplant and two yr after HCT. The continuing close collaboration between the Pediatric Nephrology and Bone Marrow Transplant teams is a major factor in this successful outcome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/petr.12619DOI Listing
February 2016

Successful matched sibling donor marrow transplantation following reduced intensity conditioning in children with hemoglobinopathies.

Am J Hematol 2015 Dec 6;90(12):1093-8. Epub 2015 Oct 6.

Department of Pediatric, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri.

Fifty-two children with symptomatic sickle cell disease sickle cell disease (SCD) (N = 43) or transfusion-dependent thalassemia (N = 9) received matched sibling donor marrow (46), marrow and cord product (5), or cord blood (1) allografts following reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) with alemtuzumab, fludarabine, and melphalan between March 2003 and May 2014*. The Kaplan-Meier probabilities of overall and event-free survival at a median of 3.42 (range, 0.75-11.83) years were 94.2% and 92.3% for the group, 93% and 90.7% for SCD, and 100% and 100% for thalassemia, respectively. Treatment-related mortality (all related to graft versus host disease, GVHD) was noted in three (5.7%) recipients, all 17-18 years of age. Acute and chronic GVHD was noted in 23% and 13%, respectively, with 81% of recipients off immunosuppression by 1 year. Graft rejection was limited to the single umbilical cord blood recipient who had prompt autologous hematopoietic recovery. Fourteen (27%) had mixed chimerism at 1 year and beyond; all had discontinued immunosuppression between 4 and 12 months from transplant with no subsequent consequence on GVHD or rejection. Infectious complications included predominantly bacteremia (48% were staphylococcus) and CMV reactivation (43%) necessitating preemptive therapy. Lymphocyte recovery beyond 6 months was associated with subsidence of infectious complications. All patients who engrafted were transfusion independent; no strokes or pulmonary complications of SCD were noted, and pain symptoms subsided within 6 months posttransplant. These findings support using RIC for patients with hemoglobinopathy undergoing matched sibling marrow transplantation (*www.Clinical Trials.gov: NCT00920972, NCT01050855, NCT02435901).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajh.24183DOI Listing
December 2015

Transplant Outcomes for Children with T Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Second Remission: A Report from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2015 Dec 29;21(12):2154-2159. Epub 2015 Aug 29.

Stem Cell Transplant Program, Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN.

Survival for children with relapsed T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is poor when treated with chemotherapy alone, and outcomes after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is not well described. Two hundred twenty-nine children with T-ALL in second complete remission (CR2) received an HCT after myeloablative conditioning between 2000 and 2011 and were reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research. Median age was 10 years (range, 2 to 18). Donor source was umbilical cord blood (26%), matched sibling bone marrow (38%), or unrelated bone marrow/peripheral blood (36%). Acute (grades II to IV) and chronic graft-versus-host disease occurred in, respectively, 35% (95% confidence interval [CI], 27% to 45%) and 26% (95% CI, 20% to 33%) of patients. Transplant-related mortality at day 100 and 3-year relapse rates were 13% (95% CI, 9% to 18%) and 30% (95% CI, 24% to 37%), respectively. Three-year overall survival and disease-free survival rates were 48% (95% CI, 41% to 55%) and 46% (95% CI, 39% to 52%), respectively. In multivariate analysis, patients with bone marrow relapse, with or without concurrent extramedullary relapse before HCT, were most likely to relapse (hazard ratio, 3.94; P = .005) as compared with isolated extramedullary disease. In conclusion, HCT for pediatric T-ALL in CR2 demonstrates reasonable and durable outcomes, and consideration for HCT is warranted.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2015.08.023DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4654112PMC
December 2015

Ethical decision making about end-of-life care issues by pediatric oncologists in economically diverse settings.

J Pediatr Hematol Oncol 2015 May;37(4):257-63

*University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill §Duke University, Durham, NC ‡Texas A&M Health Science Center, Temple, TX †St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN ∥Arkansas Children's Hospital, Little Rock, AR.

Purpose: Pediatric cancer represents 1% to 4% of all cancers worldwide, with the majority of diagnoses in developing countries where mortality remains much higher than that in high-income countries. We sought to describe differences in ethical decision-making at the end of life among an international sample of pediatric oncologists practicing in countries with a variety of income levels and resource settings.

Methods: Pediatric oncologists subscribing to an educational international oncology Web site were invited to complete a 38-item web-based survey investigating ethical domains related to end-of-life care: level of care, fiduciary responsibility, decision making, and justice.

Results: Responses were received from 401 physicians in 83 countries, with most respondents practicing in middle-income or high-income countries. Significant differences in attitudes toward ethical issues existed across the national developmental indices.

Conclusions: Further education on ethical principles is warranted in pediatric oncology, particularly among oncologists practicing in low-income or middle-income countries.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MPH.0000000000000271DOI Listing
May 2015

Transplantation Outcomes for Children with Hypodiploid Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2015 Jul 10;21(7):1273-7. Epub 2015 Apr 10.

Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio.

Children with hypodiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have inferior outcomes despite intensive risk-adapted chemotherapy regimens. We describe 78 children with hypodiploid ALL who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation between 1990 and 2010. Thirty-nine (50%) patients had ≤ 43 chromosomes, 12 (15%) had 44 chromosomes, and 27 (35%) had 45 chromosomes. Forty-three (55%) patients underwent transplantation in first remission (CR1) and 35 (45%) underwent transplantation in ≥ second remission (CR2). Twenty-nine patients (37%) received a graft from a related donor and 49 (63%) from an unrelated donor. All patients received a myeloablative conditioning regimen. The 5-year probabilities of leukemia-free survival, overall survival, relapse, and treatment-related mortality for the entire cohort were 51%, 56%, 27%, and 22%, respectively. Multivariate analysis confirmed that mortality risks were higher for patients who underwent transplantation in CR2 (hazard ratio, 2.16; P = .05), with number of chromosomes ≤ 43 (hazard ratio, 2.15; P = .05), and for those who underwent transplantation in the first decade of the study period (hazard ratio, 2.60; P = .01). Similarly, treatment failure risks were higher with number of chromosomes ≤ 43 (hazard ratio, 2.28; P = .04) and the earlier transplantation period (hazard ratio, 2.51; P = .01). Although survival is better with advances in donor selection and supportive care, disease-related risk factors significantly influence transplantation outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2015.04.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4465998PMC
July 2015