Publications by authors named "Kim Duong"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Established soft contact lens wearers' awareness of and initial experiences with orthokeratology.

Ophthalmic Physiol Opt 2021 Jul 4;41(4):673-682. Epub 2021 May 4.

University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, USA.

Objectives: To understand the initial awareness of and experience with orthokeratology in a group of adult, symptomatic, soft contact lens (CL) wearers.

Methods: This was a prospective, 3-month, open-label study of symptomatic soft CL wearers who were between the ages of 18 and 45 years. Baseline measurements were taken and then all subjects were treated with orthokeratology. A dry eye evaluation was completed at baseline prior to orthokeratology treatment. This same dry eye evaluation was completed 1 week and 1 month after orthokeratology treatment. An investigator-designed questionnaire that aimed to understand the subject's initial awareness of and experience with orthokeratology was also administered at the baseline, 1-week, 1-month and 3-month visits (perceptions, knowledge, tolerance and ability to apply and remove orthokeratology lenses).

Results: Twenty-nine out of 40 subjects completed this study. Completed subjects (age = 24.28 ± 3.75 years) had significant improvements in ocular comfort over the course of the study compared to their soft CLs. Most subjects were unfamiliar with orthokeratology before the study, were able to quickly adapt to the treatment and were likely to recommend orthokeratology to friends or children for myopia management.

Conclusions: This study found that few subjects knew about orthokeratology before learning about it through this investigation, suggesting that patients should be offered this treatment more regularly. This conclusion is supported by the ability of the subjects to learn and adapt to orthokeratology with ease, and their likelihood to recommend it to a friend or child.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/opo.12828DOI Listing
July 2021

Synthesis of chimera oligopeptide including furanoid β-sugar amino acid derivatives with free OHs: mild but successful removal of the 1,2-O-isopropylidene from the building block.

Amino Acids 2021 Feb 9;53(2):281-294. Epub 2021 Feb 9.

Laboratory of Structural Chemistry and Biology, Institute of Chemistry, ELTE Eötvös Loránd University, Pázmány P. stny. 1/A, Budapest, 1117, Hungary.

Complementary to hydrophobic five membered ring β-amino acids (e.g. ACPC), β-sugar amino acids (β-SAAs) have found increasing application as hydrophilic building blocks of foldamers and α/β chimeric peptides. Fmoc-protected β-SAAs [e.g. Fmoc-RibAFU(ip)-OH] are indeed useful Lego elements, ready to use for SPPS. The removal of 1,2-OH isopropylidene protecting group increasing the hydrophilicity of such SAA is presented here. We first used N-RibAFU(ip)-OH model compound to optimize mild deprotection conditions. The formation of the 1,2-OH free product N-RibAFU-OH and its methyl glycoside methyl ester, N-RibAFU(Me)-OMe were monitored by RP-HPLC and found that either 50% TFA or 8 eqv. Amberlite IR-120 H resin in MeOH are optimal reagents for the effective deprotection. These conditions were then successfully applied for the synthesis of chimeric oligopeptide: -GG-X-GG- [X=RibAFU(ip)]. We found the established conditions to be effective and-at the same time-sufficiently mild to remove 1,2-O-isopropylidene protection and thus, it is proposed to be used in the synthesis of oligo- and polypeptides of complex sequence combination.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00726-020-02923-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7910362PMC
February 2021

Treating Uncomfortable Contact Lens Wear With Orthokeratology.

Eye Contact Lens 2021 Feb;47(2):74-80

University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL.

Objectives: Many contact lens (CL) users permanently discontinue wear because of ocular dryness and discomfort. This study aimed to determine whether refitting symptomatic soft CL wearers in to orthokeratology could improve ocular symptoms and signs.

Methods: This was a prospective, 3-month, open-label study of symptomatic (Contact Lens Dry Eye Questionnaire [CLDEQ-8] ≥12) soft CL wearers who were between the ages of 18 and 45 years. All subjects were refit into orthokeratology CLs (Emerald, Euclid Systems). The following tests were completed: CL history, Standardized Patient Evaluation of Eye Dryness (SPEED) questionnaire, CLDEQ-8, CLDEQ-4, logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution visual acuity, pupil size, refractive error, slit-lamp biomicroscopy, noninvasive tear break-up time, tear meniscus height, phenol red thread, conjunctival staining, corneal aesthesiometry, and corneal topography.

Results: Twenty-nine of 40 qualifying subjects (age=24.43±4.62 years) completed the study. No significant differences were detected between completed and noncomplete subjects. Completed subjects had significantly better CLDEQ-8, CLDEQ-4, and SPEED scores at 3 months compared with baseline. Completed subjects had significantly better conjunctival staining scores and flatter keratometry values at 1 month compared with baseline.

Conclusions: Although not all symptomatic soft CL wearers were able to be refit into orthokeratology, subjects who were wearing orthokeratology at 3 months had a significant and clinically meaningful improvement in ocular symptoms. Additional work is needed to determine the mechanism leading to improved comfort because few clinical signs were changed after switching to orthokeratology.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ICL.0000000000000690DOI Listing
February 2021

Recurrence rate and associated factors of borderline ovarian tumors in the south of Vietnam.

J Obstet Gynaecol Res 2019 Oct 31;45(10):2055-2061. Epub 2019 Jul 31.

Stephenson Cancer Center, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA.

Aim: This study aimed to determine the recurrence rate and related risk factors of borderline ovarian tumors (BOT).

Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study with 433 patients who were surgically treated for primary BOT at Tu Du Hospital from 11/2008 to 09/2015. We used the life table method to estimate the cumulative recurrence rate. We used the log-rank test and Cox proportional hazard model to determine recurrence-associated factors.

Results: Median follow-up time was 43 months (range: 3-105 months). Eighteen patients developed recurrence. The cumulative BOT recurrence rates at year 1, 2, 3 and 4 were 1.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.5-2.8), 3.0% (95% CI = 1.7-5.2), 4.6% (95% CI = 2.9-7.4), and 5.1% (95% CI = 3.2-8.0), respectively. In the final multivariate model, a higher recurrence rate was significantly associated with primary tumor stages (stage I vs stages II and III, hazards ratio [HR] = 4.44, 95% CI = 1.60-12.38), pre-operative tumor's capsule rupture (HR = 4.14, 95% CI = 1.78-9.64), and cystectomy (HR = 5.33, 95% CI = 1.43-19.91).

Conclusion: The overall BOT recurrence rate in women in southern Vietnam was moderate. Primary tumor stage, capsule rupture, and cystectomy were main factors associated with BOT recurrence. Appropriate follow-up strategies for patients with high-risk factors are needed for early detection and management of recurrence.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jog.14072DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7053776PMC
October 2019

Ganglion cell complex loss in patients with type 1 diabetes: A 36-month retrospective study.

Oman J Ophthalmol 2019 Jan-Apr;12(1):31-36

Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Institute of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, New Jersey, USA.

Background: To analyze changes over a 3-year period in ganglion cell complex (GCC) thickness in individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (Optovue, Fremont, CA, USA).

Methods: Thirty-seven individuals from "Friends for Life Conference" with T1DM and a 3-year history of GCC thickness measurements were included in the study. Data analysis using SPSS 22 and Excel StatPlus was completed to note the subgroups that had a significant change.

Results: Significant decreases were noted in the following subgroups with slope in parenthesis. Overall: GCC superior thickness OD (-0.48)Male: GCC thickness OD (-0.86), GCC superior thickness OD (-0.735)Body mass index (BMI) 25.0-29.9: GCC thickness OD (-0.48), GCC superior thickness OS (-0.915), GCC inferior thickness OD (-0.43)Ages 10-20 years: GCC superior thickness OD (-0.635)Duration of diabetes 10-20 years: GCC thickness OD (-1.055), GCC superior thickness OD (-0.99).

Conclusion: GCC loss was noted in individuals who were males, those with BMIs of 25.0-29.9, and those who had diabetes for 10-20 years. Ganglion cell loss was also noted before the presence of any diabetic retinopathy, suggesting onset of neuronal loss before any vasculature changes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/ojo.OJO_224_2017DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6380152PMC
February 2019

A Computational Workflow Translates a 58-Gene Signature to a Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Sample-Based Companion Diagnostic for Personalized Treatment of the BRAF-Mutation-Like Subtype of Colorectal Cancers.

High Throughput 2017 Nov 6;6(4). Epub 2017 Nov 6.

Agendia NV, Science Park 406, 1098XH Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Colorectal cancer patients with the (p.V600E) mutation have poor prognosis in metastatic setting. Personalized treatment options and companion diagnostics are needed to better treat these patients. Previously, we developed a 58-gene signature to characterize the distinct gene expression pattern of -mutation-like subtype (accuracy 91.1%). Further experiments repurposed drug Vinorelbine as specifically lethal to this -mutation-like subtype. The aim of this study is to translate this 58-gene signature from a research setting to a robust companion diagnostic that can use formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples to select patients with the -mutation-like subtype. mutation and gene expression data of 302 FFPE samples were measured (mutants = 57, wild-type = 245). The performance of the 58-gene signature in FFPE samples showed a high sensitivity of 89.5%. In the identified -mutation-like subtype group, 50% of tumours were known mutants, and 50% were wild-type. The stability of the 58-gene signature in FFPE samples was evaluated by two control samples over 40 independent experiments. The standard deviations (SD) were within the predefined criteria (control 1: SD = 0.091, SD/Range = 3.0%; control 2: SD = 0.169, SD/Range = 5.5%). The fresh frozen version and translated FFPE version of this 58-gene signature were compared using 170 paired fresh frozen and FFPE samples and the result showed high consistency (agreement = 99.3%). In conclusion, we translated this 58-gene signature to a robust companion diagnostic that can use FFPE samples.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ht6040016DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5748595PMC
November 2017

Glia Open Access Database (GOAD): A comprehensive gene expression encyclopedia of glia cells in health and disease.

Glia 2015 Sep 25;63(9):1495-506. Epub 2015 Mar 25.

Medical Physiology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.

Recently, the number of genome-wide transcriptome profiles of pure populations of glia cells has drastically increased, resulting in an unprecedented amount of data that offer opportunities to study glia phenotypes and functions in health and disease. To make genome-wide transcriptome data easily accessible, we developed the Glia Open Access Database (GOAD), available via www.goad.education. GOAD contains a collection of previously published and unpublished transcriptome data, including datasets from isolated microglia, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes both at homeostatic and pathological conditions. It contains an intuitive web-based interface that consists of three features that enable searching, browsing, analyzing, and downloading of the data. The first feature is differential gene expression (DE) analysis that provides genes that are significantly up and down-regulated with the associated fold changes and p-values between two conditions of interest. In addition, an interactive Venn diagram is generated to illustrate the overlap and differences between several DE gene lists. The second feature is quantitative gene expression (QE) analysis, to investigate which genes are expressed in a particular glial cell type and to what degree. The third feature is a search utility, which can be used to find a gene of interest and depict its expression in all available expression data sets by generating a gene card. In addition, quality guidelines and relevant concepts for transcriptome analysis are discussed. Finally, GOAD is discussed in relation to several online transcriptome tools developed in neuroscience and immunology. In conclusion, GOAD is a unique platform to facilitate integration of bioinformatics in glia biology.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/glia.22810DOI Listing
September 2015

Magnetic luminescent porous silicon microparticles for localized delivery of molecular drug payloads.

Small 2010 Nov;6(22):2546-52

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA.

Magnetic manipulation, fluorescent tracking, and localized delivery of a drug payload to cancer cells in vitro is demonstrated, using nanostructured porous silicon microparticles as a carrier. The multifunctional microparticles are prepared by electrochemical porosification of a silicon wafer in a hydrofluoric acid-containing electrolyte, followed by removal and fracture of the porous layer into particles using ultrasound. The intrinsically luminescent particles are loaded with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and the anti-cancer drug doxorubicin. The drug-containing particles are delivered to human cervical cancer (HeLa) cells in vitro, under the guidance of a magnetic field. The high concentration of particles in the proximity of the magnetic field results in a high concentration of drug being released in that region of the Petri dish, and localized cell death is confirmed by cellular viability assay (Calcein AM).
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/smll.201000841DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3033739PMC
November 2010