Publications by authors named "Kim Bender"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

How do peer support workers value self-directed growth over conventional change goals among young people experiencing homelessness?

J Community Psychol 2021 Jun 30. Epub 2021 Jun 30.

Community-Based Researcher and Former Staff at the Colorado Coalition for the Homeless.

The aim of this study is to explore how peer support workers (individuals with similar lived experiences employed to provide support) conceptualize change work with young people experiencing homelessness. The present study used participatory qualitative methods, including semistructured interviews and journaling with peer support workers and program supervisors and administrators, to understand how peers understand change work with young people experiencing homelessness. This study found that peers center self-directed growth among young people experiencing homelessness, rather than change that prioritizes meeting program-directed outcomes such as obtaining housing or gaining employment. Peer relationships invite possibility and create containers of hope when supporting young people experiencing homelessness, regardless of their paths. Lastly, peers recognize that growth happens in seasons, and embrace such seasons as checkpoints on youths' journeys. Such findings may guide service providers beginning peer programming or those considering models for engaging young people experiencing homelessness in relationship-supported growth.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jcop.22649DOI Listing
June 2021

Complex health concerns among child welfare populations and the benefit of pediatric medical homes.

Child Abuse Negl 2017 Mar 10;65:212-225. Epub 2017 Feb 10.

University of Denver, Graduate School of Social Work, 2148 S. High St. Denver, CO 80208, United States. Electronic address:

Children referred to child welfare have higher-than-average rates of physical, mental, and developmental health conditions, yet coordinating medical care to address their complex needs is challenging. This study investigates complex health characteristics of child welfare-involved children to inform evolving patient-centered medical homes that incorporate multidisciplinary care and social health determinants. Study questions include: (1) To what degree do child welfare-involved children present with complex physical, behavioral, and developmental conditions? (2) How does the clustering of complex health concerns vary according to developmental stage? (3) What demographic factors relate to complex health concerns? Data are from 5873 children (birth to 18) who participated in the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-being II. Latent class analyses were conducted for children in four developmental groups (infants, preschool-age, elementary school-age, and adolescents), including up to 11 indicators from standardized health measures. For all developmental groups, the best fitting model indicated a complex health concern class and a class with fewer health concerns. Multivariate logistic regressions revealed that membership in the complex health concerns class was associated with: increased age, poverty, poor caregiver health, out-of-home placement, gender, and race/ethnicity; although some developmental differences in predictors were observed. Results suggest that for younger children, preventive approaches and integration of developmental specialists in primary care is needed, while school-age children and adolescents demonstrate greater need for integrated behavioral health. All developmental groups would benefit from multidisciplinary teams that address complex health issues related to environmental risks common among children involved in child welfare.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chiabu.2017.01.021DOI Listing
March 2017

Evaluating the impact of a classroom response system in a microbiology course.

Microbiol Educ 2006 May;7:3-11

Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Pathology, and.

The use of a Classroom Response System (CRS) was evaluated in two sections, A and B, of a large lecture microbiology course. In Section B the instructor used the CRS technology at the beginning of the class period posing a question on content from the previous class. Students could earn extra credit if they answered the question correctly. In Section A, the class also began with an extra credit CRS question. However, CRS questions were integrated into the lecture during the entire class period. We compared the two classes to see if augmenting lectures with this technology increased student learning, confidence, attendance, and the instructor's ability to respond to student's misconceptions, over simply using the CRS as a quizzing tool. Student performance was compared using shared examination questions. The questions were categorized by how the content had been presented in class. All questions came from instructors' common lecture content, some without CRS use, and some questions where Instructor A used both lecture and CRS questions. Although Section A students scored significantly better on both types of examination questions, there was no demonstrable difference in learning based on CRS question participation. However, student survey data showed that students in Section A expressed higher confidence levels in their learning and knowledge and indicated that they interacted more with other students than did the students in Section B. In addition, Instructor A recorded more modifications to lecture content and recorded more student interaction in the course than did Instructor B.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3633139PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/me.7.1.3-11.2006DOI Listing
May 2006
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