Publications by authors named "Kil Jong Yu"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Prevalence of colorectal adenomas in asymptomatic young adults: a window to early intervention?

Scand J Gastroenterol 2016 14;51(6):731-8. Epub 2016 Jan 14.

b Department of Medicine , Samsung Changwon Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine , Changwon , Korea ;

Objective: The prevalence of colorectal adenoma is increasing in the average-risk population. However, little research is available on colorectal adenoma in young adults under age 40. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and risk factors of colorectal adenoma in 20- to 39-year-old adults.

Methods: We evaluated 4286 asymptomatic young adults aged 20 to 39 years who underwent first colonoscopy screening as part of an employer-provided health wellness programme at the Health Promotion Centre of Samsung Changwon Hospital, Korea from January 2011 to December 2013. Logistic regression modelling was used to identify risk factors for colorectal adenoma in asymptomatic young adults.

Results: The prevalence of colorectal adenoma and advanced adenoma was 11.6% (497/4286) and 0.9% (39/4286), respectively. By age group, the prevalence of colorectal adenoma was 5.4% (33/608) in participants aged 20 to 29 years and 12.6% (464/3678) in participants aged 30 to 39. Colorectal adenoma was found in 13.1% (403/3072) of men and 7.7% (94/1214) of women. Increased risk of colorectal adenoma was associated with age over 30 years (OR, 2.37; 95% CI, 1.64-3.42), current smoker status (OR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.14-1.91), and alcohol consumption (OR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.03-1.63).

Conclusions: Our findings indicate that even if the prevalence of colorectal adenoma was low in young adults aged 20 to 39, being over 30, cigarette smoking, and alcohol consumption can affect young adults who have no other CRC risks.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00365521.2015.1130163DOI Listing
November 2016

[A case of superior mesenteric venous thrombosis due to protein C deficiency in a patient with duodenal ulcer bleeding].

Korean J Gastroenterol 2011 Jan;57(1):34-7

Department of Internal Medicine, Masan Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Masan, Korea.

Mesenteric venous thrombosis is a clinically very rare disease, and may cause bowel infarction and gangrene. Difficulty in the diagnosis the disease due to its non-specific symptoms and low prevalence can cause a clinically fatal situation. Mesenteric venous thrombosis may be caused by both congenital and acquired factors, and protein C deficiency, which is a very rare genetic disorder, is one of many causes of mesenteric thrombosis. The authors experienced a case of mesenteric venous thrombosis caused by protein C deficiency in a patient with duodenal ulcer bleeding, so here we report a case together with literature review.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4166/kjg.2011.57.1.34DOI Listing
January 2011