Publications by authors named "Kiana Mohajeri"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Biallelic mutation of FBXL7 suggests a novel form of Hennekam syndrome.

Am J Med Genet A 2020 01 21;182(1):189-194. Epub 2019 Oct 21.

Division of Genetics and Genomics, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.

Hennekam lymphangiectasia-lymphedema syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by congenital lymphedema, intestinal lymphangiectasia, facial dysmorphism, and variable intellectual disability. Known disease genes include CCBE1, FAT4, and ADAMTS3. In a patient with clinically diagnosed Hennekam syndrome but without mutations or copy-number changes in the three known disease genes, we identified a homozygous single-exon deletion affecting FBXL7. Specifically, exon 3, which encodes the F-box domain and several leucine-rich repeats of FBXL7, is eliminated. Our analyses of databases representing >100,000 control individuals failed to identify biallelic loss-of-function variants in FBXL7. Published studies in Drosophila indicate Fbxl7 interacts with Fat, of which human FAT4 is an ortholog, and mutation of either gene yields similar morphological consequences. These data suggest that FBXL7 may be the fourth gene for Hennekam syndrome, acting via a shared pathway with FAT4.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.61392DOI Listing
January 2020

Interchromosomal core duplicons drive both evolutionary instability and disease susceptibility of the Chromosome 8p23.1 region.

Genome Res 2016 11 7;26(11):1453-1467. Epub 2016 Oct 7.

Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA.

Recurrent rearrangements of Chromosome 8p23.1 are associated with congenital heart defects and developmental delay. The complexity of this region has led to inconsistencies in the current reference assembly, confounding studies of genetic variation. Using comparative sequence-based approaches, we generated a high-quality 6.3-Mbp alternate reference assembly of an inverted Chromosome 8p23.1 haplotype. Comparison with nonhuman primates reveals a 746-kbp duplicative transposition and two separate inversion events that arose in the last million years of human evolution. The breakpoints associated with these rearrangements map to an ape-specific interchromosomal core duplicon that clusters at sites of evolutionary inversion (P = 7.8 × 10). Refinement of microdeletion breakpoints identifies a subgroup of patients that map to the same interchromosomal core involved in the evolutionary formation of the duplication blocks. Our results define a higher-order genomic instability element that has shaped the structure of specific chromosomes during primate evolution contributing to rearrangements associated with inversion and disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/gr.211284.116DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5088589PMC
November 2016

Excess of rare, inherited truncating mutations in autism.

Nat Genet 2015 Jun 11;47(6):582-8. Epub 2015 May 11.

1] Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington, USA. [2] Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.

To assess the relative impact of inherited and de novo variants on autism risk, we generated a comprehensive set of exonic single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) and copy number variants (CNVs) from 2,377 families with autism. We find that private, inherited truncating SNVs in conserved genes are enriched in probands (odds ratio = 1.14, P = 0.0002) in comparison to unaffected siblings, an effect involving significant maternal transmission bias to sons. We also observe a bias for inherited CNVs, specifically for small (<100 kb), maternally inherited events (P = 0.01) that are enriched in CHD8 target genes (P = 7.4 × 10(-3)). Using a logistic regression model, we show that private truncating SNVs and rare, inherited CNVs are statistically independent risk factors for autism, with odds ratios of 1.11 (P = 0.0002) and 1.23 (P = 0.01), respectively. This analysis identifies a second class of candidate genes (for example, RIMS1, CUL7 and LZTR1) where transmitted mutations may create a sensitized background but are unlikely to be completely penetrant.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ng.3303DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4449286PMC
June 2015

Genome-wide association study and admixture mapping reveal new loci associated with total IgE levels in Latinos.

J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Jun 6;135(6):1502-10. Epub 2014 Dec 6.

Department of Allergy and Immunology, Kaiser Permanente-Vallejo Medical Center, Vallejo, Calif.

Background: IgE is a key mediator of allergic inflammation, and its levels are frequently increased in patients with allergic disorders.

Objective: We sought to identify genetic variants associated with IgE levels in Latinos.

Methods: We performed a genome-wide association study and admixture mapping of total IgE levels in 3334 Latinos from the Genes-environments & Admixture in Latino Americans (GALA II) study. Replication was evaluated in 454 Latinos, 1564 European Americans, and 3187 African Americans from independent studies.

Results: We confirmed associations of 6 genes identified by means of previous genome-wide association studies and identified a novel genome-wide significant association of a polymorphism in the zinc finger protein 365 gene (ZNF365) with total IgE levels (rs200076616, P = 2.3 × 10(-8)). We next identified 4 admixture mapping peaks (6p21.32-p22.1, 13p22-31, 14q23.2, and 22q13.1) at which local African, European, and/or Native American ancestry was significantly associated with IgE levels. The most significant peak was 6p21.32-p22.1, where Native American ancestry was associated with lower IgE levels (P = 4.95 × 10(-8)). All but 22q13.1 were replicated in an independent sample of Latinos, and 2 of the peaks were replicated in African Americans (6p21.32-p22.1 and 14q23.2). Fine mapping of 6p21.32-p22.1 identified 6 genome-wide significant single nucleotide polymorphisms in Latinos, 2 of which replicated in European Americans. Another single nucleotide polymorphism was peak-wide significant within 14q23.2 in African Americans (rs1741099, P = 3.7 × 10(-6)) and replicated in non-African American samples (P = .011).

Conclusion: We confirmed genetic associations at 6 genes and identified novel associations within ZNF365, HLA-DQA1, and 14q23.2. Our results highlight the importance of studying diverse multiethnic populations to uncover novel loci associated with total IgE levels.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2014.10.033DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4458233PMC
June 2015

Whole-genome sequencing of individuals from a founder population identifies candidate genes for asthma.

PLoS One 2014 12;9(8):e104396. Epub 2014 Aug 12.

Department of Human Genetics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States of America.

Asthma is a complex genetic disease caused by a combination of genetic and environmental risk factors. We sought to test classes of genetic variants largely missed by genome-wide association studies (GWAS), including copy number variants (CNVs) and low-frequency variants, by performing whole-genome sequencing (WGS) on 16 individuals from asthma-enriched and asthma-depleted families. The samples were obtained from an extended 13-generation Hutterite pedigree with reduced genetic heterogeneity due to a small founding gene pool and reduced environmental heterogeneity as a result of a communal lifestyle. We sequenced each individual to an average depth of 13-fold, generated a comprehensive catalog of genetic variants, and tested the most severe mutations for association with asthma. We identified and validated 1960 CNVs, 19 nonsense or splice-site single nucleotide variants (SNVs), and 18 insertions or deletions that were out of frame. As follow-up, we performed targeted sequencing of 16 genes in 837 cases and 540 controls of Puerto Rican ancestry and found that controls carry a significantly higher burden of mutations in IL27RA (2.0% of controls; 0.23% of cases; nominal p = 0.004; Bonferroni p = 0.21). We also genotyped 593 CNVs in 1199 Hutterite individuals. We identified a nominally significant association (p = 0.03; Odds ratio (OR) = 3.13) between a 6 kbp deletion in an intron of NEDD4L and increased risk of asthma. We genotyped this deletion in an additional 4787 non-Hutterite individuals (nominal p = 0.056; OR = 1.69). NEDD4L is expressed in bronchial epithelial cells, and conditional knockout of this gene in the lung in mice leads to severe inflammation and mucus accumulation. Our study represents one of the early instances of applying WGS to complex disease with a large environmental component and demonstrates how WGS can identify risk variants, including CNVs and low-frequency variants, largely untested in GWAS.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0104396PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4130548PMC
April 2015

Transmission disequilibrium of small CNVs in simplex autism.

Am J Hum Genet 2013 Oct 12;93(4):595-606. Epub 2013 Sep 12.

Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA 98195, USA.

We searched for disruptive, genic rare copy-number variants (CNVs) among 411 families affected by sporadic autism spectrum disorder (ASD) from the Simons Simplex Collection by using available exome sequence data and CoNIFER (Copy Number Inference from Exome Reads). Compared to high-density SNP microarrays, our approach yielded ∼2× more smaller genic rare CNVs. We found that affected probands inherited more CNVs than did their siblings (453 versus 394, p = 0.004; odds ratio [OR] = 1.19) and that the probands' CNVs affected more genes (921 versus 726, p = 0.02; OR = 1.30). These smaller CNVs (median size 18 kb) were transmitted preferentially from the mother (136 maternal versus 100 paternal, p = 0.02), although this bias occurred irrespective of affected status. The excess burden of inherited CNVs among probands was driven primarily by sibling pairs with discordant social-behavior phenotypes (p < 0.0002, measured by Social Responsiveness Scale [SRS] score), which contrasts with families where the phenotypes were more closely matched or less extreme (p > 0.5). Finally, we found enrichment of brain-expressed genes unique to probands, especially in the SRS-discordant group (p = 0.0035). In a combined model, our inherited CNVs, de novo CNVs, and de novo single-nucleotide variants all independently contributed to the risk of autism (p < 0.05). Taken together, these results suggest that small transmitted rare CNVs play a role in the etiology of simplex autism. Importantly, the small size of these variants aids in the identification of specific genes as additional risk factors associated with ASD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2013.07.024DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3791263PMC
October 2013

Evolution and diversity of copy number variation in the great ape lineage.

Genome Res 2013 Sep 3;23(9):1373-82. Epub 2013 Jul 3.

Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98105, USA.

Copy number variation (CNV) contributes to disease and has restructured the genomes of great apes. The diversity and rate of this process, however, have not been extensively explored among great ape lineages. We analyzed 97 deeply sequenced great ape and human genomes and estimate 16% (469 Mb) of the hominid genome has been affected by recent CNV. We identify a comprehensive set of fixed gene deletions (n = 340) and duplications (n = 405) as well as >13.5 Mb of sequence that has been specifically lost on the human lineage. We compared the diversity and rates of copy number and single nucleotide variation across the hominid phylogeny. We find that CNV diversity partially correlates with single nucleotide diversity (r(2) = 0.5) and recapitulates the phylogeny of apes with few exceptions. Duplications significantly outpace deletions (2.8-fold). The load of segregating duplications remains significantly higher in bonobos, Western chimpanzees, and Sumatran orangutans-populations that have experienced recent genetic bottlenecks (P = 0.0014, 0.02, and 0.0088, respectively). The rate of fixed deletion has been more clocklike with the exception of the chimpanzee lineage, where we observe a twofold increase in the chimpanzee-bonobo ancestor (P = 4.79 × 10(-9)) and increased deletion load among Western chimpanzees (P = 0.002). The latter includes the first genomic disorder in a chimpanzee with features resembling Smith-Magenis syndrome mediated by a chimpanzee-specific increase in segmental duplication complexity. We hypothesize that demographic effects, such as bottlenecks, have contributed to larger and more gene-rich segments being deleted in the chimpanzee lineage and that this effect, more generally, may account for episodic bursts in CNV during hominid evolution.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/gr.158543.113DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3759715PMC
September 2013