Publications by authors named "Kia Sepassi"

11 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Design, Synthesis, and Preclinical Evaluation of 3-Methyl-6-(5-thiophenyl)-1,3-dihydro-imidazo[4,5-]pyridin-2-ones as Selective GluN2B Negative Allosteric Modulators for the Treatment of Mood Disorders.

J Med Chem 2020 09 28;63(17):9181-9196. Epub 2020 Aug 28.

Janssen Research & Development, LLC, 3210 Merryfield Row, San Diego, California 92121-1126, United States.

Selective inhibitors of the GluN2B subunit of -methyl-d-aspartate receptors in the ionotropic glutamate receptor superfamily have been targeted for the treatment of mood disorders. We sought to identify structurally novel, brain penetrant, GluN2B-selective inhibitors suitable for evaluation in a clinical setting in patients with major depressive disorder. We identified a new class of negative allosteric modulators of GluN2B that contain a 1,3-dihydro-imidazo[4,5-]pyridin-2-one core. This series of compounds had poor solubility properties and poor permeability, which was addressed utilizing two approaches. First, a series of structural modifications was conducted which included replacing hydrogen bond donor groups. Second, enabling formulation development was undertaken in which a stable nanosuspension was identified for lead compound . Compound was found to have robust target engagement in rat with an ED of 1.4 mg/kg. The nanosuspension enabled sufficient margins in preclinical toleration studies to nominate for progression into advanced good laboratory practice studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.jmedchem.9b02113DOI Listing
September 2020

A Dipolar Cycloaddition Reaction To Access 6-Methyl-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1H-[1,2,3]triazolo[4,5-c]pyridines Enables the Discovery Synthesis and Preclinical Profiling of a P2X7 Antagonist Clinical Candidate.

J Med Chem 2018 01 20;61(1):207-223. Epub 2017 Dec 20.

Janssen Research & Development, LLC , 3210 Merryfield Row, San Diego, California 92121, United States.

A single pot dipolar cycloaddition reaction/Cope elimination sequence was developed to access novel 1,4,6,7-tetrahydro-5H-[1,2,3]triazolo[4,5-c]pyridine P2X7 antagonists that contain a synthetically challenging chiral center. The structure-activity relationships of the new compounds are described. Two of these compounds, (S)-(2-fluoro-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)(1-(5-fluoropyrimidin-2-yl)-6-methyl-1,4,6,7-tetrahydro-5H-[1,2,3]triazolo[4,5-c]pyridin-5-yl)methanone (compound 29) and (S)-(3-fluoro-2-(trifluoromethyl)pyridin-4-yl)(1-(5-fluoropyrimidin-2-yl)-6-methyl-1,4,6,7-tetrahydro-5H-[1,2,3]triazolo[4,5-c]pyridin-5-yl)methanone (compound 35), were found to have robust P2X7 receptor occupancy at low doses in rat with ED values of 0.06 and 0.07 mg/kg, respectively. Compound 35 had notable solubility compared to 29 and showed good tolerability in preclinical species. Compound 35 was chosen as a clinical candidate for advancement into phase I clinical trials to assess safety and tolerability in healthy human subjects prior to the initiation of proof of concept studies for the treatment of mood disorders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.jmedchem.7b01279DOI Listing
January 2018

Identification of (R)-(2-Chloro-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)(1-(5-fluoropyridin-2-yl)-4-methyl-6,7-dihydro-1H-imidazo[4,5-c]pyridin-5(4H)-yl)methanone (JNJ 54166060), a Small Molecule Antagonist of the P2X7 receptor.

J Med Chem 2016 09 8;59(18):8535-48. Epub 2016 Sep 8.

Janssen Pharmaceutical Research & Development, LLC , 3210 Merryfield Row, San Diego, California 92121 United States.

The synthesis and SAR of a series of 4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-imidazo[4,5-c]pyridine P2X7 antagonists are described. Addressing P2X7 affinity and liver microsomal stability issues encountered with this template afforded methyl substituted 4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-imidazo[4,5-c]pyridines ultimately leading to the identification of 1 (JNJ 54166060). 1 is a potent P2X7 antagonist with an ED50 = 2.3 mg/kg in rats, high oral bioavailability and low-moderate clearance in preclinical species, acceptable safety margins in rats, and a predicted human dose of 120 mg of QD. Additionally, 1 possesses a unique CYP profile and was found to be a regioselective inhibitor of midazolam CYP3A metabolism.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.jmedchem.6b00989DOI Listing
September 2016

Characterization of 2-(2,6-dichloro-benzyl)-thiazolo[5,4-d]pyrimidin-7-yl]-(4-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-amine (JNJ-39729209) as a novel TRPV1 antagonist.

Eur J Pharmacol 2011 Aug 10;663(1-3):40-50. Epub 2011 May 10.

Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research & Development, L.L.C., 3210 Merryfield Row, San Diego, CA 92121, USA.

As an integrator of multiple nociceptive and/or inflammatory stimuli, TRPV1 is an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of various painful disorders. Several TRPV1 antagonists have been advanced into clinical trials and the initial observations suggest that TRPV1 antagonism may be associated with mild hyperthermia and thermal insensitivity in man. However, no clinical efficacy studies have been described to date, making an assessment of risk:benefit impossible. Furthermore, it is not clear whether these early observations are representative of all TRPV1 antagonists and whether additional clinical studies with novel TRPV1 antagonists are required in order to understand optimal compound characteristics. In the present study we describe 2-(2,6-dichloro-benzyl)-thiazolo[5,4-d]pyrimidin-7-yl]-(4-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-amine (JNJ-39729309) as a novel, TRPV1 antagonist. JNJ-39729209 displaced tritiated resiniferotoxin binding to TRPV1 and prevented TRPV1 activation by capsaicin, protons and heat. In-vivo, JNJ-39729209 blocked capsaicin-induced hypotension, induced a mild hyperthermia and inhibited capsaicin-induced hypothermia in a dose dependent manner. JNJ-39729209 showed significant efficacy against carrageenan- and CFA-evoked thermal hyperalgesia and exhibited significant anti-tussive activity in a guinea-pig model of capsaicin-induced cough. In pharmacokinetic studies, JNJ-39729209 was found to have low clearance, a moderate volume of distribution, good oral bioavailability and was brain penetrant. On the basis of these findings, JNJ-39729209 represents a structurally novel TRPV1 antagonist with potential for clinical development. The advancement of JNJ-39729209 into human clinical trials could be useful in further understanding the analgesic potential of TRPV1 antagonists.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejphar.2011.05.001DOI Listing
August 2011

Pharmacological characterization of 1-(5-chloro-6-(trifluoromethoxy)-1H-benzoimidazol-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole-4-carboxylic acid (JNJ-42041935), a potent and selective hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor.

Mol Pharmacol 2011 Jun 3;79(6):910-20. Epub 2011 Mar 3.

Cardiovascular Metabolic Research, Johnson and Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development LLC, 3210 Merryfield Row, San Diego, CA 92121, USA.

The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) prolyl hydroxylase (PHD) enzymes represent novel targets for the treatment of anemia, ulcerative colitis, and ischemic and metabolic disease inter alia. We have identified a novel small-molecule inhibitor of PHD, 1-(5-chloro-6-(trifluoromethoxy)-1H-benzoimidazol-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole-4-carboxylic acid (JNJ-42041935), through structure-based drug design methods. The pharmacology of JNJ-42041935 was investigated in enzyme, cellular, and whole-animal systems and was compared with other compounds described in the literature as PHD inhibitors. JNJ-42041935, was a potent (pK(I) = 7.3-7.9), 2-oxoglutarate competitive, reversible, and selective inhibitor of PHD enzymes. In addition, JNJ-42041935 was used to compare the effect of selective inhibition of PHD to intermittent, high doses (50 μg/kg i.p.) of an exogenous erythropoietin receptor agonist in an inflammation-induced anemia model in rats. JNJ-42041935 (100 μmol/kg, once a day for 14 days) was effective in reversing inflammation-induced anemia, whereas erythropoietin had no effect. The results demonstrate that JNJ-42041935 is a new pharmacological tool, which can be used to investigate PHD inhibition and demonstrate that PHD inhibitors offer great promise for the treatment of inflammation-induced anemia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1124/mol.110.070508DOI Listing
June 2011

Pre-clinical characterization of aryloxypyridine amides as histamine H3 receptor antagonists: identification of candidates for clinical development.

Bioorg Med Chem Lett 2010 Jul 16;20(14):4210-4. Epub 2010 May 16.

Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research & Development L.L.C., 3210 Merryfield Row, San Diego, CA 92121, USA.

The pre-clinical characterization of novel aryloxypyridine amides that are histamine H(3) receptor antagonists is described. These compounds are high affinity histamine H(3) ligands that penetrate the CNS and occupy the histamine H(3) receptor in rat brain. Several compounds were extensively profiled pre-clinically leading to the identification of two compounds suitable for nomination as development candidates.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bmcl.2010.05.041DOI Listing
July 2010

Accounting for the effects of moderately increased pressure on the energetics of melting and solubility in metered dose inhalers.

Drug Dev Ind Pharm 2008 Sep;34(9):930-5

College of Pharmacy, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA.

The purpose of this study is to account for thermodynamic variations due to changes in the physical environment of propellant-based systems, particularly metered dose inhalers (MDIs). Twenty organic compounds were measured via differential scanning calorimetry under ambient pressure, 60 psi, and 90 psi. The increase in pressure did not affect the melting point of any of the compounds. A modest increase (approximately 8%) in enthalpy of fusion was noted. This correlates to a modest increase in entropy of fusion, and thus ideal crystalline solubility, though the magnitude of this change depends primarily on the melting point of the given compound. Because the relationship between melting point and solubility is logarithmic, compounds with higher melting points are affected more by this increased energy of melting. Based on the findings, modest changes can be made to predictive models to estimate solubility in propellant systems to account for changes in the physical environment of MDIs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03639040802154871DOI Listing
September 2008

Comparison of aqueous solubility estimation from AQUAFAC and the GSE.

Int J Pharm 2008 Aug 23;360(1-2):122-47. Epub 2008 Apr 23.

University of Arizona, College of Pharmacy, 1703 E. Mabel Street, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA.

The GSE (General Solubility Equation) and AQUAFAC (Aqueous Functional Group Activity Coefficients) are two empirical models for aqueous solubility prediction. This study compares the aqueous solubility estimation of a set of 1642 pharmaceutically and environmentally related compounds, using the two methods. The average absolute errors in the solubility prediction are 0.543 log units for AQUAFAC and 0.576 log units for the GSE. About 88.0% of the AQUAFAC solubilities and 83.0% of the GSE molar aqueous solubilities are predicted within one log unit of the observed values. The marginally greater accuracy of AQUAFAC is due to the fact that it utilizes fitted-parameters for many structural fragments and is based on experimental solubility data. The GSE on the other hand is a simpler, non-regression based equation which uses two parameters for solubility prediction.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpharm.2008.04.028DOI Listing
August 2008

Formulation and in vivo evaluation of chlorpropham (CIPC) oral formulations.

J Pharm Sci 2008 Dec;97(12):5222-8

Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, 2425 Ridgecrest Dr. SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108, USA.

The objective of these studies was to examine the in vivo performance of oral formulations of chlorpropham (CIPC). In order to develop a new oral formulation several different solubilization techniques were evaluated, namely: cosolvents, surfactants, and complexing agents. The solubilization data indicated that a conventional solution formulation was not plausible. Two self-emulsifying drug delivery systems (SEDDS) were developed and evaluated for stability. Both SEDDS formulations were found to be chemically stable. In vivo analysis of a SEDDS formulation, a suspension formulation and an intravenous bolus dose was conducted in F344 rats. Pharmacokinetic analysis of the formulation data indicated that the SEDDS formulation provided only marginally better oral bioavailability compared to a suspension formulation. While SEDDS formulations often result in greater bioavailability this was not observed for CIPC. In vivo analysis indicate that CIPC results in a situation where the dissolution rate of CIPC from the suspension is not rate limiting, rather the absorption rate in the GI tract is rate-limiting. This paradigm is the result of CIPCs low melting point and the relatively small particle size of the suspension which facilitate the dissolution in the GI tract.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jps.21384DOI Listing
December 2008

Solubility prediction in octanol: a technical note.

AAPS PharmSciTech 2006 Mar 24;7(1):E26. Epub 2006 Mar 24.

College of Pharmacy, University of Arizona, Tucson, USA.

The purpose of this work was to derive an equation for the rapid estimation of octanol solubilities of organic compounds. Solubilities ranging over 4 orders of magnitude were predicted with an average absolute error of 0.39 logarithmic units using melting point alone. The greatest error in prediction occurred for strongly bonded compounds.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1208/pt070126DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2750733PMC
March 2006

Solubility prediction in octanol: A technical note.

AAPS PharmSciTech 2006 Mar 8;7(1):E184-E191. Epub 2017 Mar 8.

College of Pharmacy, University of Arizona, 1703 East Mabel St, 85721, Tucson, AZ.

The purpose of this work was to derive an equation for the rapid estimation of octanol solubilities of organic compounds. Solubilities ranging over 4 orders of, magnitude were predicted with an average absolute error of 0.39 logarithmic units using melting point alone. The greatest error in prediction occurred for strongly bonded compounds.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1208/pt070126DOI Listing
March 2006