Publications by authors named "Ki Hyeong Park"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Different patterns of belowground fungal diversity along altitudinal gradients with respect to microhabitat and guild types.

Environ Microbiol Rep 2021 Jun 23. Epub 2021 Jun 23.

School of Biological Sciences, Institute of Microbiology, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea.

Fungi are key components of belowground ecosystems with various ecological roles in forests. Although the changes in the richness and composition of belowground fungi across altitudinal gradients have been widely reported, only a few studies have focused on the microhabitat types along altitudinal gradients. Here, we analysed the effect of altitude on the ectomycorrhizal and non-ectomycorrhizal fungal communities in belowground microhabitats. We collected root and soil samples from 16 Pinus densiflora forests at various altitudes across Korea, and measured the soil properties as potential factors. Fungal communities were analysed by high-throughput sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) region. We found that altitude negatively affected the species richness of root-inhabiting fungi but did not influence that of soil-inhabiting fungi. In addition, the composition of ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi was less influenced by altitude than non-ECM fungi. Most of the soil properties did not show a significant relationship with altitude, but the effect of soil properties was different across microhabitat types and ecological roles of fungi. Our results reveal that microhabitat types and altitudinal gradients differently affect the richness and composition of fungal communities associated with P. densiflora, providing a better understanding of plant-associated fungal communities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1758-2229.12976DOI Listing
June 2021

Influence of Season and Soil Properties on Fungal Communities of Neighboring Climax Forests ( and ).

Front Microbiol 2020 28;11:572706. Epub 2020 Oct 28.

School of Biological Sciences and Institute of Microbiology, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea.

Trees in forest ecosystems constantly interact with the soil fungal community, and this interaction plays a key role in nutrient cycling. The diversity of soil fungal communities is affected by both environmental factors and host tree species. We investigated the influence of both of these factors by examining the total fungal communities in the rhizospheric soil of climax tree species that have similar ecological roles (, an ectomycorrhizal [ECM] tree, and , an arbuscular mycorrhizal [AM] tree) in temperate forests with continental climates of Mt. Jeombong, South Korea. Fungal communities were assessed by Illumina-MiSeq sequencing the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of environmental DNA, and comparing their environmental factors (season and soil properties). We found that soil fungi of the two forest types differed in terms of community structure and ecological guild composition. The total fungal community composition changed significantly with seasons and soil properties in the forest, but not in the forest. However, potassium and carbon were significantly correlated with fungal diversity in both forests, and a positive correlation was found only between symbiotrophs of and the carbon to nitrogen (C/N) ratio. Thus, the effects of environmental factors on soil fungal communities depended on the host trees, but some factors were common in both forests. Our results indicate that individual tree species should be considered when anticipating how the fungal communities will respond to environmental change.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2020.572706DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7655983PMC
October 2020

Successional Change of the Fungal Microbiome Pine Seedling Roots Inoculated With .

Front Microbiol 2020 25;11:574146. Epub 2020 Sep 25.

School of Biological Sciences, Institute of Microbiology, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea.

The pine mushroom (; Agaricales, Tricholomataceae) is an ectomycorrhizal fungus that produces a commercially valuable, edible mushrooms. Attempts to artificially cultivate has so far been unsuccessful. One method used to induce to produce fruiting bodies of in the wild is shiro (mycelial aggregations of ) transplantation. ectomycorrhization of with seedlings of has been successful, but field trials showed limited production of fruiting bodies. Few studies have been done to test what happens after transplantation in the wild, whether persists on the pine seedling roots or gets replaced by other fungi. Here, we investigated the composition and the interaction of the root fungal microbiome of seedlings inoculated with over a 3 year period after field transplantation, using high-throughput sequencing. We found a decline of colonization on pine roots and succession of mycorrhizal fungi as seedlings grew. Early on, roots were colonized by fast-growing, saprotrophic Ascomycota, then later replaced by early stage ectomycorrhiza such as . At the end, more competitive species dominated the host roots. Most of the major OTUs had negative or neutral correlation with , but several saprotrophic/plant pathogenic/mycoparasitic species in genera , , and had positive correlation with . Four keystone species were identified during succession; two species (, and ) had a positive correlation with , while the other two had a negative correlation (, ). These findings have important implications for further studies on the artificial cultivation of .
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2020.574146DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7545793PMC
September 2020

Two New Species of (Agaricales, Basidiomycota) from Korea.

Mycobiology 2020 Jul 17;48(4):288-295. Epub 2020 Jul 17.

School of Biological Sciences and Institute of Microbiology, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.

Species of (Hydnangiaceae, Agaricales, and Basidiomycota) are well-known ectomycorrhizal symbionts of a broad range of hosts. species are characterized by brown, orange, or purple colored basidiocarps, and globose or oblong, echinulate and multinucleate basidiospores. While some species are easily identified at the species level using only the morphological characteristics, others are hard to distinguish at the species level due to small differences in morphology. Heretofore, ten species have been reported in Korea. While studying the fungal diversity in the National Parks of Korea, two new species were discovered. Species identification was done based on molecular analyses (ITS, 28S rDNA, 2, and 1), then were confirmed by their corresponding morphologies. The two newly discovered species are proposed here as and . The unique morphological characters of . that distinguish it from its closely related species are orange-brown colored basidiocarp, long basidia and the absence of cheilocystidia. is characterized by a light grayish lavender-colored pileus and the absence of cheilocystidia. Two new species are described and illustrated in the present paper.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/12298093.2020.1786961DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7476507PMC
July 2020

in Korea: New Records and a New Species.

Mycobiology 2019 18;47(4):368-377. Epub 2019 Sep 18.

School of Biological Sciences and Institute of Microbiology, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.

The genus (Agaricales, Basidiomycota) is easy to recognize at the genus level because of big, fleshy basidiocarps with squamules covering the pileus; a single or double annulus; and big, thick-walled basidiospores with a germ pore. However, morphological identification is often unreliable in due to similar morphological features among species. Due to the uncertainty of previous morphological identification in the genus it is necessary to re-examine Korean using molecular data. We re-examined 34 specimens collected from 2012 to 2018 in Korea using a reverse taxonomic approach, whereby species identification was first done based on the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region analysis, followed by morphological confirmation. We identified the presence of four species: , . , . , and sp. nov. Two species ( and . ) were previously unrecorded from Korea and is a new species. Detailed descriptions of all four species and taxonomic key are provided in this study. and are distributed through the country, but and are distributed only in limited areas. According to our results, the combination of ITS locus and morphology proved to be a robust approach to evaluate the taxonomic status of species in Korea. Additional surveys are needed to verify the species diversity and clarify their geographic distribution.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/12298093.2019.1663122DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6968693PMC
September 2019

Ten New Recorded Species of Macrofungi on Ulleung Island, Korea.

Mycobiology 2017 Dec 31;45(4):286-296. Epub 2017 Dec 31.

School of Biological Sciences and Institute of Microbiology, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Korea.

Ulleung Island is a biodiversity hotspot in South Korea. During a survey of indigenous fungal species from Ulleung Island conducted from 2015 to 2016, we discovered 10 unrecorded macrofungi in Korea. These macrofungi were identified to the species level using morphological features and phylogenetic analysis based on the internal transcribed spacer region: , , , , , , , , , and . We also provide detailed morphological descriptions for these 10 species.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5941/MYCO.2017.45.4.286DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5780360PMC
December 2017

Diversity of fungi associated with roots of Calanthe orchid species in Korea.

J Microbiol 2018 Jan 4;56(1):49-55. Epub 2018 Jan 4.

School of Biological Sciences and Institute of Microbiology, Seoul National University, Seoul, 08826, Republic of Korea.

While symbiotic fungi play a key role in the growth of endangered Calanthe orchid species, the relationship between fungal diversity and Calanthe species remains unclear. Here, we surveyed root associated fungal diversity of six Calanthe orchid species by sequencing the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region using 454 pyrosequencing. Our results revealed that Paraboeremia and Coprinopsis are dominant fungal genera among Calanthe species. In terms of overall relative abundance, Paraboeremia was the most common fungal genus associated with Calanthe roots, followed by Coprinopsis. Overall fungal diversity showed a significant degree of variation depending on both location and Calanthe species. In terms of number of different fungal genera detected within Calanthe species, C. discolor had the most diverse fungal community, with 10 fungal genera detected. This study will contribute toward a better understanding of those fungi that are required for successful cultivation and conservation of Korean Calanthe species.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12275-018-7319-9DOI Listing
January 2018

Three New Recorded Species of the Physalacriaceae on Ulleung Island, Korea.

Mycobiology 2017 Mar 31;45(1):9-14. Epub 2017 Mar 31.

School of Biological Sciences and Institute of Microbiology, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Korea.

Most known species in the Physalacriaceae are saprotrophs that grow on decaying leaves and wood, and approximately 21 genera in the Physalacriaceae have been reported worldwide. During an ongoing survey of indigenous fungi in Korea, four specimens belonging to the Physalacriaceae were collected on Ulleung Island. These specimens were identified as three species based on morphological characteristics and molecular analysis of rDNA-internal transcribed spacer sequences. Three species in three genera were shown to be new records in Korea: , , and . The latter two are the first records of these genera in Korea. In this study, we provide detailed morphological descriptions of these species and describe their phylogenetic position within the Physalacriaceae.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5941/MYCO.2017.45.1.9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5395503PMC
March 2017
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