Publications by authors named "Ki Deok Shin"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Biological evaluation of KRIBB3 analogs as a microtubule polymerization inhibitor.

Bioorg Med Chem Lett 2011 Feb 13;21(3):977-9. Epub 2010 Dec 13.

Bio-Therapeutics Research Institute, KRIBB, Ochang, Republic of Korea.

A series of KRIBB3 analogs were synthesized by modifying substituents at aryl moieties of KRIBB3 for examining structure-activity relationships, and their inhibitory activities on microtubule polymerization were evaluated. The presence of free phenolic hydrogens in aryl moieties of KRIBB3 analogs plays an important role in inhibition of microtubule polymerization.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bmcl.2010.12.044DOI Listing
February 2011

KRIBB11 inhibits HSP70 synthesis through inhibition of heat shock factor 1 function by impairing the recruitment of positive transcription elongation factor b to the hsp70 promoter.

J Biol Chem 2011 Jan 15;286(3):1737-47. Epub 2010 Nov 15.

Medical Genomics Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon 305-806, Korea.

Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) is the master switch for heat shock protein (HSP) expression in eukaryotes. A synthetic chemical library was screened to identify inhibitors of HSF1 using a luciferase reporter under the control of a heat shock element. A compound named KRIBB11 (N(2)-(1H-indazole-5-yl)-N(6)-methyl-3-nitropyridine-2,6-diamine) was identified for its activity in abolishing the heat shock-induced luciferase activity with an IC(50) of 1.2 μmol/liter. When the cells were exposed to heat shock in the presence of KRIBB11, the induction of HSF1 downstream target proteins such as HSP27 and HSP70 was blocked. In addition, treatment of HCT-116 cells with KRIBB11 induced growth arrest and apoptosis. Markers of apoptosis, such as cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, were detected after KRIBB11 treatment. Biotinyl-KRIBB11 was synthesized as an affinity probe for the identification of KRIBB11 target proteins. Using affinity chromatography and competition assays, KRIBB11 was shown to associate with HSF1 in vitro. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that KRIBB11 inhibited HSF1-dependent recruitment of p-TEFb (positive transcription elongation factor b) to the hsp70 promoter. Finally, intraperitoneal treatment of nude mice with KRIBB11 at 50 mg/kg resulted in a 47.4% (p < 0.05) inhibition of tumor growth without body weight loss. Immunoblotting assays showed that the expression of HSP70 was lower in KRIBB11-treated tumor tissue than in control tissues. Because HSPs are expressed at high levels in a wide range of tumors, these results strengthen the rationale for targeting HSF1 in cancer therapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M110.179440DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3023468PMC
January 2011

Cryptotanshinone inhibits constitutive signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 function through blocking the dimerization in DU145 prostate cancer cells.

Cancer Res 2009 Jan;69(1):193-202

Laboratory of Chemical Biology and Chemical Genomics, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, 52 Uendong Yoosunggu, Daejeon, Korea.

Because signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is constitutively activated in most human solid tumors and is involved in the proliferation, angiogenesis, immune evasion, and antiapoptosis of cancer cells, researchers have focused on STAT3 as a target for cancer therapy. We screened for natural compounds that inhibit the activity of STAT3 using a dual-luciferase assay. Cryptotanshinone was identified as a potent STAT3 inhibitor. Cryptotanshinone rapidly inhibited STAT3 Tyr705 phosphorylation in DU145 prostate cancer cells and the growth of the cells through 96 hours of the treatment. Inhibition of STAT3 Tyr705 phosphorylation in DU145 cells decreased the expression of STAT3 downstream target proteins such as cyclin D1, survivin, and Bcl-xL. To investigate the cryptotanshinone inhibitory mechanism in DU145 cells, we analyzed proteins upstream of STAT3. Although phosphorylation of Janus-activated kinase (JAK) 2 was inhibited by 7 micromol/L cryptotanshinone at 24 hours, inhibition of STAT3 Tyr705 phosphorylation occurred within 30 minutes and the activity of the other proteins was not affected. These results suggest that inhibition of STAT3 phosphorylation is caused by a JAK2-independent mechanism, with suppression of JAK2 phosphorylation as a secondary effect of cryptotanshinone treatment. Continuing experiments revealed the possibility that cryptotanshinone might directly bind to STAT3 molecules. Cryptotanshinone was colocalized with STAT3 molecules in the cytoplasm and inhibited the formation of STAT3 dimers. Computational modeling showed that cryptotanshinone could bind to the SH2 domain of STAT3. These results suggest that cryptotanshinone is a potent anticancer agent targeting the activation STAT3 protein. It is the first report that cryptotanshinone has antitumor activity through the inhibition of STAT3.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-08-2575DOI Listing
January 2009

KRIBB3, a novel microtubule inhibitor, induces mitotic arrest and apoptosis in human cancer cells.

Biochem Pharmacol 2008 Jan 30;75(2):383-94. Epub 2007 Aug 30.

Molecular Cancer Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, 52 Eoeun-dong Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806, Republic of Korea.

KRIBB3 (5-(5-ethyl-2-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)-4-(4-methoxyphenyl) isoxazole) inhibited cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Flow cytometry studies showed that KRIBB3 caused cell cycle arrest at the G(2)/M phase and subsequent apoptosis. This was confirmed as accumulation of Cyclin B1 and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) were detected. While transient inhibition by KRIBB3 led to reversible mitotic arrest, prolonged exposure to KRIBB3-induced apoptosis. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments showed that KRIBB3 initially induced association of inhibitory Mad2 with p55CDC (mammalian homologue of CDC20), an activator of APC/C (anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome), suggesting that the mitotic spindle checkpoint was activated by KRIBB3. However, the level of this inhibitory complex of Mad2 with p55CDC was gradually decreased 24 h after KRIBB3 treatment, and was hardly detectable after 48 h, indicating some slipping of the mitotic checkpoint. Consistent with these observations, KRIBB3 activated the mitotic spindle checkpoint by disrupting the microtubule cytoskeleton. KRIBB3 was proven to be a tubulin inhibitor using in vitro polymerization assays and in vivo indirect immunofluorescence staining. The temporal pattern of Bax activation by KRIBB3 was similar to PARP cleavage, suggesting that Bax is a mediator of KRIBB3-dependent apoptosis. Furthermore, when KRIBB3 was administered intraperitoneally into nude mice at 50 mg/kg or 100 mg/kg, it inhibited 49.5 or 70.3% of tumor growth, respectively. These results suggest that KRIBB3 is a good drug candidate for cancer therapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bcp.2007.08.027DOI Listing
January 2008

Blocking tumor cell migration and invasion with biphenyl isoxazole derivative KRIBB3, a synthetic molecule that inhibits Hsp27 phosphorylation.

J Biol Chem 2005 Dec 18;280(50):41439-48. Epub 2005 Oct 18.

Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, 52 Uendong Yoosunggu, Daejeon 305-600, Korea.

Cell migration is a prerequisite for cancer invasion and metastasis, suggesting cell motility as a potential therapeutic target for cancer treatment. A synthetic library was screened to identify inhibitors of tumor cell migration. From this, we discovered that CAC-1098 (aurintricarboxylic acid) and CBI-0997 (5-(2,4-dimethoxy-5-ethylphenyl)-4-(4-bromophenyl) isoxazole) inhibited migration of MDA-MB-231 cells with IC50 = 5 and 50 nM, respectively. We synthesized KRIBB3 (5-(5-ethyl-2-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)-4-(4-methoxyphenyl) isoxazole) by replacing the bromide group of CBI-0997 with a methoxyl group. Like CBI-0997, KRIBB3 has anti-migratory and anti-invasive activities in MDA-MB-231 cells. Because KRIBB3 has a better drug-like structure, we focused our effort on further understanding its anti-migratory mechanism. Biotinyl-KRIBB3 was synthesized as an affinity probe for identification of KRIBB3-binding proteins. Using affinity chromatography, we identified Hsp27 as a target protein of KRIBB3 in vitro. Treatment of MDA-MB-231 cells with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate induced protein kinase C-dependent phosphorylation of Hsp27 and tumor cell migration. In contrast, treatment of MDA-MB-231 cells with KRIBB3 blocked phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced phosphorylation of Hsp27 and tumor cell migration. Furthermore, overexpression of Hsp27 antagonized the inhibitory effect of KRIBB3 on tumor cell invasion, and knockdown of Hsp27 using small interfering RNA inhibited tumor cell migration. Overall, our results demonstrate that KRIBB3 inhibits tumor cell migration and invasion by blocking protein kinase C-dependent phosphorylation of Hsp27 through its direct binding to Hsp27.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M507209200DOI Listing
December 2005

2'-benzoyloxycinnamaldehyde induces apoptosis in human carcinoma via reactive oxygen species.

J Biol Chem 2004 Feb 3;279(8):6911-20. Epub 2003 Dec 3.

Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, 52 Uendong Yoosunggu, Taejeon 305-600, Korea.

2'-hydroxycinnamaldehyde (HCA) has been shown to have inhibitory effects on farnesyl protein transferase in vitro, angiogenesis, and tumor cell growth. However, mechanism for these inhibitions remains unknown. As a derivative of HCA, BCA (2'-benzoyl-oxycinnamaldehyde) was synthesized by replacing hydroxyl group with benzoyl-oxyl group. When p53-mutated cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell and SW620 colon cancer cell) were treated with 10 microM HCA or BCA, it induced growth arrest and apoptosis of tumor cells. Markers of apoptosis such as degradations of chromosomal DNA and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and activation of caspase-3 were detected after HCA or BCA treatment. BCA-induced apoptosis was blocked by pretreatment of cells with anti-oxidants, glutathione, or N-acetyl-cysteine. In addition, BCA-induced activation of caspase-3 and degradation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase were abolished by pretreatment of cells with the anti-oxidants. These results suggest that reactive oxygen species are major regulator of BCA-induced apoptosis. HCA or BCA-induced accumulation of reactive oxygen species was detected by using DCF-DA, an intracellular probe of oxidative stress. Furthermore, when BCA (100 mg/kg) was administrated intraperitoneally or orally into a nude mouse, it inhibited >88 or 41% of tumor growth, respectively, without any detectable weight change. These results suggest that BCA is a good drug candidate for cancer therapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M309708200DOI Listing
February 2004