Publications by authors named "Khashayar Saheb-Ekhtiari"

19 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Rotator cuff tear with concomitant long head of biceps tendon (LHBT) degeneration: what is the preferred choice? Open subpectoral versus arthroscopic intraarticular tenodesis.

J Orthop Traumatol 2019 Jul 5;20(1):26. Epub 2019 Jul 5.

Orthopedic Department, Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Parastar Ave, Poursina Hospital, P.O. Box: 4193713191, Rasht, Iran.

Background: Lesions associated with the biceps tendon are commonly detected during arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff tears. Acquiring a preferable technique to repair both cuff and long head of biceps tendon (LHBT) lesions was the aim of several recent studies. This study aimed to compare clinical and functional outcomes of open subpectoral versus arthroscopic intraarticular tenodesis in patients with repairable rotator cuff tear associated with LHBT degeneration.

Patients And Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, 60 eligible candidates for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (mean age 55.7 ± 6.9 years) were allocated to a control group (open subpectoral, SP) or intervention group (intraarticular, IA). In the IA group, an anchor suture was used for both rotator cuff repair and LHBT tenodesis. In the SP group, after arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuff, subpectoral tenodesis of LHBT was performed using an interference screw. Patients were evaluated for 2 years follow-up regarding pain intensity using the visual analogue scale (VAS) and shoulder function using the Constant Score and Simple Shoulder Test.

Results: The two groups were similar with regard to demographic characteristics and preoperative evaluations (all P > 0.05). The functional status of both groups was improved, but not significantly differently so between the two groups (P = 0.1 and P = 0.4, respectively). Pain intensity decreased during the 2-year follow-up period, similarly so in the two groups. Patient satisfaction was also similar in the two groups.

Conclusion: Large and massive rotator cuff tears (tears > 3 cm) associated with LHBT pathologies benefited from intraarticular or subpectoral tenodesis similarly, with no differences in short- or mid-term results between these two techniques.

Level Of Evidence: II.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s10195-019-0531-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6611854PMC
July 2019

Intra-sheath versus extra-sheath ultrasound guided corticosteroid injection for trigger finger: a triple blinded randomized clinical trial.

Phys Sportsmed 2018 Feb 10;46(1):93-97. Epub 2017 Nov 10.

e General Practitioner, Guilan Road Trauma Research Center , Guilan University of Medical Sciences , Rasht , Iran.

Objective: The aim of this study is to compare clinical results of ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injection, intra-sheath versus extra-sheath of the finger flexor tendon.

Methods: A total of 166 patients with trigger finger were evaluated in a triple blind randomized clinical trial study. All the patients were injected with 1ml of 40mg/ml methyl prednisolone acetate, under the guidance of ultrasound. Half the patients were injected extra sheath, while the other half were injected intra sheath at the level of first annular pulley.

Results: The two groups were comparable in baseline characteristics (age, gender, dominant hand, involved hand and finger, and the symptoms duration). No significant difference was observed in the two groups with regards to Quinnell grading. In the final visit, 94% of patients from each group were symptom free.

Conclusion: Results of corticosteroid injection intra-sheath or extra-sheath of the finger flexor tendon under ultrasound guidance in patients with trigger finger are comparably alike. Extra-sheath injection at the level of A1 pulley is as effective as an Intra-sheath administration.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00913847.2018.1400897DOI Listing
February 2018

Predicting the Hamstring Tendon Diameter Using Anthropometric Parameters.

Arch Bone Jt Surg 2016 Oct;4(4):314-317

Guilan Road Trauma Research Center, Poursina Hospital, Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Rasht, Iran.

Background: Despite the importance of hamstring tendon autograft, one major disadvantage in applying this technique in the surgical reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament is individual variability in the tendon diameter. Hence, the purpose of the present study was to use anthropometric parameters such as gender, height and body mass index to predict 4-strand (quadruple) hamstring tendons (gracilis and 2-strand semitendinosus tendons).

Methods: This is a cross-sectional study conducted on all consecutive patients who underwent arthroscopic ACL reconstruction between 2013 and 2015. The anthropometric variables (age, gender, height, and body mass index) were recorded. The quadruple hamstring tendon (gracilis and semitendinosus) autografts were measured using sizing cylinders. The relationship between these parameters was statistically determined using the Pearson Spearman test and linear regression test.

Results: The mean age of the 178 patients eligible for the study was 29.58±9.93 (118 males and 60 females). The mean hamstring tendon diameter was 7.8±0.7 mm, the mean for males was 7.9±0.6 and for females 7.8±9 mm (=0.0001). There were significant correlations between the mean hamstring tendon diameter with BMI (Pearson correlation=0.375, R=0.380, and =0.0001), height (Pearson correlation=0.441, R=0.121, and =0.0001), and weight (Pearson correlation=0.528, R= -0.104 and =0.0001). However, patient's age and genderwerenot found to be a predictor of the size of the hamstring tendon diameter.

Conclusion: Based on findings from this study weight, height, body mass index, and the length of the tendon may be predictors of the hamstring tendon diameter for anterior cruciate ligamentreconstruction. These findings could be used in preoperative planning of patients undergoing ACL reconstruction surgery to estimate the size of the graft and select of the appropriate type of graft.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5100445PMC
October 2016

Rotator Cuff Repair: Is there any role for acromioplasty?

Phys Sportsmed 2016 Sep 5;44(3):274-7. Epub 2016 Aug 5.

c Orthopedic Research Center , Guilan University of Medical Sciences , Rasht , Guilan , Iran.

Objectives: Acromioplasty has been one of the most common techniques amongst orthopedic surgeries in the past decade. However, its efficacy in arthroscopic surgeries of rotator cuff repair is still debatable. The purpose of this study is to compare the arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with or without acromioplasty in patients with complete rotator cuff tear.

Methods: In this prospective cohort study, patients with complete rotator cuff tear (acromion type II or III Bigliani) and a history of failure to the conservative treatment for at least 6 months were evaluated for eligibility. Patients, based on the time interval, were placed in one of two groups: arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with (RCR-A group) and without acromioplasty (RCR group). Patients were assessed for two years in term of pain intensity by VAS criteria and shoulder functional status by Quick-DASH, Constant score and simple shoulder test criteria.

Results: In the baseline assessment, RCR-A group (34 patients) and RCR group (33 patients) were similar. Comparing patients in two groups in relation to SST, Quick-DASH and VAS scores preoperatively showed there is no significant difference between the two groups. The SST, Quick-DASH and VAS scores improved significantly in both groups at both the 6-month and 2-year follow-ups (all P < 0.001). The extent of progress in the functional scores was similar in both groups (P > 0.05).

Conclusion: Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair without acromioplasty may be as reliable and useful as conventional rotator cuff repair with acromioplasty. Thus, acromioplasty cannot be recommended as a routine technique in every rotator cuff repair.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00913847.2016.1216717DOI Listing
September 2016

Calcitonin effects on shoulder adhesive capsulitis.

Eur J Orthop Surg Traumatol 2016 Aug 8;26(6):575-80. Epub 2016 Jul 8.

Poursina Hospital, Orthopedic Department of Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Parastar Ave., Rasht, Iran.

Introduction: Adhesive capsulitis (frozen shoulder) is a relatively prevalent disease of shoulder and affects soft tissue of glenohumeral joint. Signs include painful restricted motion and disability of the patient in daily activities. Calcitonin is a thyroid hormone, and its effectiveness has been demonstrated in painful conditions. The presents study aims to evaluate the effect of calcitonin in treating shoulder adhesive capsulitis.

Method: This double-blinded randomized clinical trial was conducted on 64 patients suffering from shoulder adhesive capsulitis. The intervention and control groups were given intranasal calcitonin and placebo for 6 weeks, respectively. For both groups, physiotherapy and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were administered correspondingly. The patients were evaluated pre- and post-treatment for shoulder pain and shoulder range of motion (ROM). Shoulder functional outcome (secondary outcome) was evaluated using Disability of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand, Shoulder Pain and Disability Index, and Health Assessment Questionnaire disability criteria.

Results: The mean age of patients in calcitonin and control group was 52.4 ± 4.6 and 53.2 ± 4.9, respectively. Demographic characteristics and pre-treatment scores were similar in both groups (all P > 0.05). In post-treatment follow-up, shoulder pain, ROM, and the patients' functional scores were significantly improved in both groups (P < 0.001); however, the improvement in calcitonin group was more effective than that of placebo group.

Conclusion: Intranasal calcitonin spray could be an additional safe alternative in shoulder adhesive capsulitis with regard to the efficiency in alleviating pain and improving functional outcome.

Level Of Evidence: II.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00590-016-1816-5DOI Listing
August 2016

Hamstring tendon autograft versus fresh-frozen tibialis posterior allograft in primary arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a retrospective cohort study with three to six years follow-up.

Int Orthop 2016 Sep 18;40(9):1905-11. Epub 2016 Mar 18.

Orthopaedic Department, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Introduction: Selection of various grafts for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions have been employed in order to improve on stability and function of the knee. This study aimed to compare stability and function of the knee after ACL arthroscopic reconstruction by single-loop tibialis posterior (TP) allograft and four-strand hamstring tendon (HT) autograft.

Materials And Methods: The retrospective cohort study included 104 patients in the TP group matched with 118 patients in the HT group in terms of demographic characteristics, associated meniscus injury, subjective and objective knee characteristics. All patients were followed up for at least three years with regards to mentioned criteria and time of return to former activities.

Results: The mean (range) age of TP (88 males and 16 females) and HT (99 males and 19 females) groups was 34.4 (19-48) and 36.9 (20-51) years, respectively. Median (range) follow-up durations were 55 (37-71) and 56 (36-72) months, respectively. No significant differences were observed post-operatively, regarding subjective and objective evaluations. Additionally, time duration for return to former activity was similar in both groups. Post-operative paresthesia and numbness of medial aspect of the calf were observed for two months in eight patients of the HT group which persisted to the final visit in one case. No similar symptom was seen in the TP group.

Conclusion: In arthroscopic ACL reconstruction, fresh frozen doubled TP allograft compared to HT autograft was equally effective in restoring function and stability of knee, permitting return to former activities.

Level Of Evidence: Retrospective comparative, Level III.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00264-016-3164-9DOI Listing
September 2016

How Much are Emergency Medicine Specialists' Decisions Reliable in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Pediatric Fractures?

Arch Bone Jt Surg 2016 Jan;4(1):60-4

Guilan Road Trauma Research Center, School of Medicine, Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Rasht, Iran.

Background: Considering the importance of an early diagnosis and proper decision-making in regards to the treatment of pediatric distal radius and elbow fractures, this study examines emergency medicine specialists' accuracy in the diagnosis and treatment of these patients.

Methods: From 2012 and 2013, children less than 14 years old who were referred to an academic hospital emergency department with elbow or distal radius fractures were enrolled. Initially, patients were examined by an emergency medicine specialist and then they were referred to an orthopedic surgeon. Type of fracture and the proposed treatment of two specialists were compared.

Results: In total, there were 108 patients (54 patients in each group) with a mean age of 8.1±3.3 years. Identical diagnosis in 48 cases (88.9%) of distal radius and 36 cases (66.7%) of elbow trauma were observed. We found a difference between diagnosis of the two specialists in diagnosing lateral condyle of the humerus fracture in the elbow group and growth plate fracture in the distal radius fracture group, but the differences were not significant. Among 108 patients, 70 patients (64.8%) received identical treatment.

Conclusion: Although the emergency medicine specialists responded similarly to the orthopedic specialists in the diagnosis of pediatric distal radius and elbow fractures, diagnosis of more complicated fractures such as lateral condylar humoral fractures, distal radius growth plate and for choosing the proper treatment option, merits further education.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4733238PMC
January 2016

Treatment Outcomes of Corticosteroid Injection and Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy as Two Primary Therapeutic Methods for Acute Plantar Fasciitis: A Prospective Randomized Clinical Trial.

J Foot Ankle Surg 2015 Nov-Dec;54(6):1047-52. Epub 2015 Jul 26.

General Practitioner and Researcher, Orthopedic Research Center, Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Rasht, Iran.

The outcome of corticosteroid injection (CSI) and extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) as primary treatment of acute plantar fasciitis has been debated. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate and compare the therapeutic effects of CSI and ESWT in patients with acute (<6-week duration) symptomatic plantar fasciitis. Of the 116 eligible patients, 68 were randomized to 2 equal groups of 34 patients, each undergoing either ESWT or CSI. The ESWT method included 2000 impulses with energy of 0.15 mJ/mm(2) and a total energy flux density of 900 mJ/mm(2) for 3 consecutive sessions at 1-week intervals. In the CSI group, 40 mg of methyl prednisolone acetate plus 1 mL of lidocaine 2% was injected into the maximal tenderness point at the inframedial calcaneal tuberosity. The success and recurrence rates and pain intensity measured using the visual analog scale, were recorded and compared at the 3-month follow-up visit. The pain intensity had reduced significantly in all patients undergoing either technique. However, the value and trend of pain reduction in the CSI group was significantly greater than those in the ESWT group (p < .0001). In the ESWT and CSI groups, 19 (55.9%) and 5 (14.7%) patients experienced treatment failure, respectively. Age, gender, body mass index, and recurrence rate were similar between the 2 groups (p > .05). Both ESWT and CSI can be used as the primary and/or initial treatment option for treating patients with acute plantar fasciitis; however, the CSI technique had better therapeutic outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/j.jfas.2015.04.026DOI Listing
August 2016

Snow Catastrophe Conditions: What is its Impact on Orthopedic Injuries?

Arch Bone Jt Surg 2014 Jun 15;2(2):111-3. Epub 2014 Jun 15.

Mohsen Mardani-Kivi MD, Road Trauma Research Center, Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Rasht, Iran.

Background: Iran places sixth amongst high risk natural disaster countries and Guilan province of Iran shoulders a large amount of socio-economic burden due to snow catastrophes. The more knowledge of circumstances we have, the more efficient our future encounters will be.

Methods: In this retrospective study, of all of the patients admitted to Poursina Hospital due to snow and ice related trauma in the first two weeks of February 2014, 306 cases were found eligible for entry into the present study.

Results: Of the 306 eligible patients (383 injuries), there were 175 men (57.2%) and 131 women (42.8%). Most patients suffered from orthopedic injuries (81%) and the most common fractures were distal radius fractures in the upper extremities and hip fractures in the lower extremities. Slipping was the most common and motor vehicle accidents had the rarest injury mechanisms. It was shown that the frequency of injuries were higher on icy days (67.6%) than snowy days (32.4%).

Conclusions: Snow crises may lead to increased risk of slipping and falling situations, especially on icy days. The peak of injury rates is a few days after snowfall with the most common injury being distal radius fracture. Providing essential instructions and supporting resource allocation to better handle such catastrophes may improve outcomes.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4151451PMC
June 2014

Is gabapentin effective on pain management after arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction? A triple blinded randomized controlled trial.

Arch Bone Jt Surg 2013 Sep 15;1(1):18-22. Epub 2013 Sep 15.

Mohsen Mardani-Kivi MD, Department of Orthopedic Surgery Guilan Road Trauma Research Center, Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Rasht, Iran.

Background: Acute pain is common after arthroscopic surgeries and it is one of the most important causes of patient dissatisfaction, admission time and increased morbidity . Gabapentin with anti-hyperalgesic effects can play a critical role in pre-emptive analgesia methods. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of gabapentin in pain management after surgery and the rate of drug consumption in patients who are candidate for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction arthroscopic surgery.

Methods: In this randomized, triple blind clinical trial, 114 patients who were candidate for arthroscopic ACL reconstruction were divided into two groups of gabapentin (G) and placebo (p), with 57 patients in each group. The intervention group received gabapentin 600 mg and a placebo was administered in control group. Patients received on-demand pethedine for pain management. The primary outcome was pain intensity according to the visual analogue scale (VAS) and the secondary outcome was the amount of opioid consumption and incidence of side effects (including: dizziness, sedation, nausea and vomiting) at 6 and 24 h visits.

Results: The mean pain intensity in G group at both the 6 and 24 hour visits was significantly lower than the control group (Both P<0.001). Also, patients in the gabapentin group consumed less opioid at both visits in comparison to the placebo group (p<0.001, P=0.032). The incidence rate of sedation, dizziness, nausea and vomiting was similar in both groups.

Conclusion: In arthroscopic ACL reconstruction, administering a preoperative single dose of 600mg gabapentin may decrease both pain intensity and opioid consumption.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4151400PMC
September 2013

Role of gracilis harvesting in four-strand hamstring tendon anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a double-blinded prospective randomized clinical trial.

Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc 2015 Apr 15;23(4):1086-91. Epub 2014 Feb 15.

Orthopedic Department, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran.

Purpose: Weakness in knee flexion following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is one of the key issues in the treatment of an ACL tear. The purpose of this study was to examine and compare clinical outcome measures of ACL reconstruction using semitendinosus autograft (ST) versus semitendinosus + gracilis (ST/G) reconstructive techniques.

Methods: In a double-blind randomized clinical study, 19 patients with an ACL tear underwent either ST (59) or ST/G (61) and observed for 1 year. Both patients and the final examiner were unaware as to the type of graft received. Patients were evaluated according to subjective criteria, functional assessment tests, knee isometric torques, knee laxity using KT-2000 and knee range of motion.

Results: The study included 21 (17.6 %) female and 99 (82.4 %) male patients with a mean age of 29.9 ± 7.8 in the ST group and 32.4 ± 6.3 in the ST/G group. There were no significant differences found in surgical complications; IKD; Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score; Lysholm; strength of the knee isometric flexors; and flexion and extension loss between the two groups. At the final visit, 86.9 % of ST group and 89.6 % of ST/G group had side-to-side difference of laxity <3 mm (n.s.).

Conclusions: Since anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using quadrupled ST is more technically demanding than doubled STG and with there being no difference in outcomes and complications, no compulsory advice should be made on the former technique. However, gracilis harvesting may not be necessary based on the function and strength of the knee.

Level Of Evidence: Randomized controlled trial, Level I.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00167-014-2890-zDOI Listing
April 2015

Corticosteroid injection with or without thumb spica cast for de Quervain tenosynovitis.

J Hand Surg Am 2014 Jan 4;39(1):37-41. Epub 2013 Dec 4.

Orthopedic Research Center, Poursina Hospital, School of Medicine, Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Rash; and the Orthopedic Department, Bahonar Hospital, School of Medicine, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran.

Purpose: To compare the corticosteroid injection (CSI) with or without thumb spica cast (TSC) for de Quervain tendinitis.

Methods: In this prospective trial, 67 eligible patients with de Quervain tenosynovitis were randomly assigned into CSI + TSC (33 cases) and CSI (34 cases) groups. All patients received 40 mg of methylprednisolone acetate with 1 cc lidocaine 2% in the first dorsal compartment at the area of maximal point tenderness. The primary outcome was the treatment success rate, and the secondary outcome was the scale and quality of the treatment method using Quick Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand and visual analog scale scores.

Results: The groups had no differences in mean age, sex, and occupation. The visual analog scale and Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand scores were similar in both groups before the treatment. The treatment success rate was 93% in the CSI + TSC group and 69% in the CSI group. Although both methods improved the patients' conditions significantly in terms of relieving pain and functional ability, CSI + TSC had a significantly higher treatment success rate.

Conclusions: The combined technique of corticosteroid injection and thumb spica casting was better than injection alone in the treatment of de Quervain tenosynovitis in terms of treatment success and functional outcomes.

Type Of Study/level Of Evidence: Therapeutic II.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhsa.2013.10.013DOI Listing
January 2014

The comparison of Ethibond sutures and semitendinosus autograft in the surgical treatment of acromioclavicular dislocation.

Acta Orthop Traumatol Turc 2013 ;47(5):307-10

Orthopedic Research Center, Poursina Hospital, Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Rasht, Iran.

Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the results of the surgical reconstruction of the acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) dislocations using No. 5 Ethibond suture or semitendinosus autograft.

Methods: This analytical cross-sectional study was conducted on the medical records of 39 patients (35 males and 4 females; mean age: 32.6±11.8 years), with complete ACJ joint dislocation (Type 3 to 6). Twenty one patients underwent reconstruction using No. 5 Ethibond suture (Group A) and 18 patients using semitendinosus tendon autograft (Group B). The patients' database records were queried for the information regarding the evaluations during follow-up period (mean: 25.7 months) such as radiographic evaluations, Constant score, VAS score and infection.

Results: The mean Constant score was 91±1 and 92±2.1 in Groups A and B, respectively. There was a reduction of ACJ based on Zanca view in 15 patients in Group A and 12 patients in Group B. There was subluxation of ACJ by less than 25% in six patients in Group A and five in Group B, in that, the difference was not significant. Patients expressed acceptable satisfaction and equal pain severity in rest and daily activity in both groups. No deep infection has been observed.

Conclusion: Since both surgical techniques led to satisfactory results, reduction of ACJ, excellent functional score and acceptable patient satisfaction, No. 5 Ethibond suture technique could be recommended as the treatment of choice due to the absence of morbidity in removing semitendinosus autograft tendon.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3944/aott.2013.3015DOI Listing
July 2014

Celecoxib as a pre-emptive analgesia after arthroscopic knee surgery; a triple-blinded randomized controlled trial.

Arch Orthop Trauma Surg 2013 Nov 17;133(11):1561-6. Epub 2013 Sep 17.

Orthopedic Department, Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Rasht, Iran.

Background: Pre-emptive analgesia not only controls pain but also may result in the reduction of opioid consumption and related side effects following orthopedic surgeries. The purpose of the present study was to examine the therapeutic effects of celecoxib in reducing pain following the arthroscopic knee surgeries: anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and partial meniscectomy.

Materials And Methods: In this triple-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial, celecoxib 400 mg and identical placebo were administered, 2 h prior to operation, to 130 patient candidates for undergoing knee arthroscopic surgery of either isolated meniscectomy or ACL reconstruction. Pain intensity, 24 h opioid consumption and the related side effects were measured at 6 and 24 h post operation.

Results: The patients in both groups were similar with regards to demographic characteristics such as age, gender and body mass index. The results of the study indicated that the pain intensity and opioid consumption were lower in both subgroups (meniscectomy and ACL-R) in celecoxib group at 6 and 24 h post operation (P < 0.0001). The side effects of analgesics such as nausea and vomiting, sedation, and dizziness were not significantly different between the two groups (P > 0.05).

Conclusion: It seems that celecoxib as a pre-emptive analgesia agent is effective in decreasing acute postoperative pain and 24 h opioid consumption in patients undergoing arthroscopic knee surgery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00402-013-1852-0DOI Listing
November 2013

The effects of corticosteroid injection versus local anesthetic injection in the treatment of lateral epicondylitis: a randomized single-blinded clinical trial.

Arch Orthop Trauma Surg 2013 Jun 15;133(6):757-63. Epub 2013 Mar 15.

Orthopedic Research Center, Poursina Hospital, School of Medicine, Guilan University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box: 4193713191, Rasht, Iran.

Introduction: This study seeks to compare two treatment methods of lateral epicondylitis: corticosteroid injection (CSI) and a local anesthetic injection (LAI).

Materials And Methods: In this single-blinded randomized clinical trial, 138 patients with the diagnosis of lateral epicondylitis were assigned either into CSI group receiving methylprednisolone 1 ml (49 patients) or LAI group (51 patients) receiving procaine 1 ml 2 % in a single dose at the maximal point tenderness site. The primary outcome measure was elbow disability using Quick DASH, and secondary outcome measures were pain intensity using Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and recurrence rate at pretreatment visit and at 3-, 6- and 12-week post-treatment visits.

Results: There were no significant differences between the patients in both groups for demographic factors including age, gender, dominant hand, involved hand, and work pressure. Before treatment, the patients in both groups were suffering from the same rates of elbow disability and pain as measured by Quick DASH and VAS, respectively, (p > 0.05). In general, the recovery rate (comparison between pretreatment visit and last post-treatment visit) was significantly more effective and higher in CSI than LAI. CSI was dramatically more effective at 3-week visit, but less and less effective at 6- and 12-week visits. At 12-week visit the recurrence rate was 34.7 % (17 patients) in CSI group.

Conclusion: For lateral epicondylitis, CSI has the best short-term treatment results yet the highest recurrent rates. The combination of CSI with other treatment option or with a change in injection technique from single injection to peppering injection may be promising.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00402-013-1721-xDOI Listing
June 2013

Evaluation of clinical outcomes of cementless total hip arthroplasty in patients under 30 years of age.

Eur J Orthop Surg Traumatol 2013 Oct 27;23(7):785-90. Epub 2012 Sep 27.

Orthopedic Research Center, "Poursina" Hospital, Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Parastaar St, P.O. Box: 4193713191, Rasht, Guilan, Iran,

Background: Historically, performing a successful hip joint replacement in patients aged fewer than 30 years has been an orthopedic challenge. The newer generation of prostheses and surgical techniques has the potential to increase the longevity of implants. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of cementless hip arthroplasty in patients aged fewer than 30 years.

Materials And Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 41 patients (46 hips) were studied with a mean age of 24, 4 (from 17 to 30 years) of whom underwent cementless metal-polyethylene hip arthroplasty from 2004 to 2007. The Harris hip score (HHS) was used to assess the functional consequences. Patients were followed up in terms of early complications (thrombophlebitis of the lower limbs, dislocation, hematoma and infection) and late complications (aseptic loosening, dislocation and reoperation) at weeks 3 and 6, at 3 and 6 months, 1 year after surgery and annually thereafter.

Results: Patients were followed for an average of 5 years and 2 months (from 51 to 82 months). One early complication (symptomatic thrombophlebitis) and one late dislocation (2.2 %) were observed. There were no cases of aseptic loosening or osteolysis at the end of follow-up. The preoperative HHS was 59.6 (from 41 to 76), which rose to 82 and 83.5 after the 1-year and final follow-up, respectively, which was a significant increase.

Conclusions: Hip arthroplasty using a new generation of cementless proximal porous prosthesis with resistant polyethylene to cover the joint surfaces in patients aged fewer than 30 years is satisfactory and is accompanied by low complications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00590-012-1084-yDOI Listing
October 2013

Arthroscopic treatment of patients with anterolateral impingement of the ankle with and without chondral lesions.

J Foot Ankle Surg 2013 Mar-Apr;52(2):188-91. Epub 2013 Jan 10.

Orthopedic Department, Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Rasht, Iran.

Anterolateral impingement syndrome is defined as chronic pain in the ankle secondary to soft tissue impingement, hypertrophy, or tearing of the lateral and anterolateral ligaments of the ankle. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the results of arthroscopic treatment of anterolateral impingement syndrome and its association with chondral lesions. In this case series study, 23 patients with anterolateral impingement syndrome underwent arthroscopic debridement of the ankle. Simple radiography and magnetic resonance imaging were applied for all the patients to diagnose the spur condition and to exclude patients with other possible lesions. All the patients were evaluated preoperatively and at interval visits of 2, 4, and 6 weeks and 3 and 6 months postoperatively according to the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society criteria and Meislin score. The mean patient age was 38.13 ± 6.85 years. Significant differences were seen between the mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society scores, which was 59.21 before surgery and 83.56 and 88.13 at 3 and 6 months postoperatively, respectively. No significant differences were seen between the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society scores of the patients with or without chondral lesions. Arthroscopic treatment of anterolateral impingement syndrome is recommended as the treatment of choice and is still considerably effective in patients with chondral lesions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/j.jfas.2012.10.017DOI Listing
August 2013

Efficacy of sonographically guided intra-flexoral sheath corticosteroid injection in the treatment of trigger thumb.

Acta Orthop Traumatol Turc 2012 ;46(5):346-52

Department of Orthopedics, Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Rasht, Iran.

Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of sonographically guided intra-flexoral sheath corticosteroid injection in the treatment of trigger thumb.

Methods: This study included 112 trigger thumbs of 104 patients (7 males, 97 females; mean age: 52.11 years) studied prospectively from 2009 to 2011. All patients experienced pain, tenderness, discomfort and/or triggering with flexion/extension of the thumb and palpable nodules at the level of the A1 pulley. Ultrasonographically guided corticosteroid injection was performed on all affected thumbs. Thumb improvement was evaluated using the Quinnell grading system and patients were followed up for one year.

Results: All 112 thumbs received one ultrasonographically guided corticosteroid injection. Fifteen thumbs (13.4%) needed re-injection and/or surgery during their one year follow-up. Eight (53.3%) of these 15 cases, had a pre-treatment Quinnell Grade of 4, six (40%) thumbs were Grade 3 and one (6.7%) was Grade 2. Twelve were re-injected, two underwent surgery without re-injection and one underwent surgery after showing no improvement following re-injection. There was a significant reduction in the post-injection Quinnell grade (p<0.0001). One year after the initial injection, 108 thumbs (96.4%) were completely symptom-free.

Conclusion: Sonographically guided intra-flexoral sheath corticosteroid injection is an effective method in the treatment of trigger thumb and reduces the need for surgery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3944/aott.2012.2787DOI Listing
June 2013

Antero-medial portal vs. transtibial techniques for drilling femoral tunnel in ACL reconstruction using 4-strand hamstring tendon: a cross-sectional study with 1-year follow-up.

Med Sci Monit 2012 Nov;18(11):CR674-9

Orthopedic Research Center, Orthopedic Department, Poursina Hospital, Parastar Street, Rasht, Guilan, Iran.

Background: Antero-medial portal (AMP) and trans-tibial (TT) techniques are the most widely used methods for drilling femoral tunnel in ACL reconstructions; yet, debate continues about the preferred method. This study seeks to compare these 2 techniques in patients with ACL tears.

Material/methods: In this comparative study, all cases of isolated ACL reconstruction using 4-strand hamstring tendon in 2006-2010 were evaluated for eligibility. Of 266 patients, 124 cases (60 TT and 64 AMP), with the mean age of 28.48±8.3, met the inclusion criteria. Both groups were compared in 8 follow-ups from the point of view of time of: return to post-surgical activities (including walking without crutches, normal life activity, jogging, and exercising), maximum range of passive movements, knee instability (Lachman test), functional condition (subjective IKDC and Lysholm knee scores), therapeutic outcomes, and patient's satisfaction with treatment (VAS).

Results: AMP technique significantly accelerates patients' return to activity. AMP patients achieved full range of motion much sooner than TT cases (P<0.0001). After 1-year follow-up, S-IKDC scores were 94.8 ± 3.9 and 89.2 ± 4.1 and S-LKS scores were 96.1 ± 3 and 92.2 ± 4.1 for AMP and TT groups, respectively (P<0.0001). Knee stability was similar in both groups on Lachman test (P=0.25). AMP group patients (VAS mean score: 9.78 ± 0.4) had greater satisfaction compared to TT group patients (VAS mean score: 9.53 ± 0.5) (P=0.003).

Conclusions: AMP technique leads to reduction in time to return to routine activities, better therapeutic outcomes and higher satisfaction rates.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3560599PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.12659/msm.883546DOI Listing
November 2012