Prof. Khalifa Sifaw Ghenghesh, PhD - Independent Researcher

Prof. Khalifa Sifaw Ghenghesh

PhD

Independent Researcher

Cairo | Egypt

Main Specialties: Medical Microbiology

Additional Specialties: Medical Microbiology

Prof. Khalifa Sifaw Ghenghesh, PhD - Independent Researcher

Prof. Khalifa Sifaw Ghenghesh

PhD

Introduction

Primary Affiliation: Independent Researcher - Cairo , Egypt

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:


View Prof. Khalifa Sifaw Ghenghesh’s Resume / CV

Metrics

Number of Publications

23

Publications

Number of Profile Views

538

Profile Views

Number of Article Reads

141

Reads

Number of Citations

92

Citations

Publications

23Publications

141Reads

92PubMed Central Citations

Prevalence of Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia lamblia, and Cryptosporidium spp. in Libya: 2000-2015.

Libyan J Med 2016 29;11:32088. Epub 2016 Jun 29.

Faculty of Medicine, University of Tripoli, Tripoli, Libya.

View Article
January 2017
3 Reads
2 Citations

Carbapenem-resistant gram-negative bacilli in Tripoli, Libya.

Am J Infect Control 2016 Oct 27;44(10):1192-1194. Epub 2016 Jul 27.

El-Nakheel Compound, Cairo, Egypt. Electronic address:

View Article
October 2016
4 Reads
2.210 Impact Factor

New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase and OXA-48 carbapenemases in Gram-negative bacilli isolates in Libya.

Libyan J Med 2015 19;10:29206. Epub 2015 Aug 19.

El-Nakheel Compound, El-Sherouk City, Cairo, Egypt;

View Article
April 2016
4 Reads
3 Citations

Aeromonas in Arab countries: 1995-2014.

Comp Immunol Microbiol Infect Dis 2015 Oct 1;42:8-14. Epub 2015 Aug 1.

Faculty of Medicine, University of Tripoli, Tripoli, Libya.

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October 2015
5 Reads
2.020 Impact Factor

Genospecies and virulence factors of Aeromonas species in different sources in a North African country

Libyan J Med 2014, 9: 25497 - http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/ljm.v9.25497

Libyan Journal of Medicine

Introduction: Aeromonads of medical importance have been reported from numerous clinical, food, and water sources, but identification of genospecies and virulence factors of Aeromonas species from countries in North Africa and the Middle East are few. Methods: In total 99 Aeromonas species isolates from different sources (diarrheal children [n23], nondiarrheal children [n16], untreated drinking water from wells [n32], and chicken carcasses [n28]) in Tripoli, Libya, were included in the present investigation. Genus identification was confirmed by biochemical analysis, and genospecies were determined using a combination of 16S rDNA variable region and gyrB sequence analysis. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect genes encoding toxins from 52 of the isolates. Results: We identified 44 isolates (44%) as A. hydrophila (3 [3.0%] subspecies anaerogenes, 23 [23%] subspecies dhakensis, and 18 [18%] subspecies ranae); 27 isolates (27%) as A. veronii; 23 isolates (23%) as A. caviae; and 5 isolates (5.0%) as other genospecies. The genes encoding aerolysin (aer), cytolytic enterotoxin (act), and A. hydrophila isolate SSU enterotoxin (ast) were detected in 45 (87%), 4 (7.7%), and 9 (17%) of the 52 isolates tested, respectively. The gene encoding an extracellular lipase (alt) was not detected. Conclusion: The majority of aeromonads from Libya fall within three genospecies (i.e. A. hydrophila, A. veronii, and A. caviae), and genes coding for toxin production are common among them.

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September 2014
100 Reads

High isolation rates of multidrug-resistant bacteria from water and carpets of mosques

Libyan J Med 2014, 9: 25415 - http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/ljm.v9.25415

Libyan Journal of Medicine

Objective: There is little information regarding the isolation of antimicrobial-resistant potentially pathogenic bacteria from water and carpets of mosques worldwide. The objective of the present investigation is to determine the bacteriological quality of water and carpets of mosques in Elkhomes city in Libya. Methods: Potentially pathogenic bacteria were isolated from water samples (n44) and dust samples from carpets (n50) of 50 mosques in Elkhomes city, Libya, using standard bacteriological procedures. Susceptibility of isolated bacteria to antimicrobial agents was determined by the disc-diffusion method. Results: Of the water samples examined, 12 (27.3%) were positive for Escherichia coli, 10 (22.7%) for Klebsiella spp., and 15 (34.1%) for other enteric bacteria. Of the dust samples of carpets examined, 6 (12%) were positive for E. coli, 33 (66%) for Klebsiella spp., and 30 (60%) for Staphylococcus spp. Multidrug resistance (MDR, resistance to three or more antimicrobial groups) was found among 48.7% (19/37) and 46.9% (30/64) of the examined enterobacteria from water and carpets, respectively, and among 66.7% (20/30) of Staphylococcus spp. from carpets. In addition, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was isolated from a carpet of one mosque. Conclusion: Presence of multidrug-resistant potentially pathogenic bacteria in examined water and carpets indicate that mosques as communal environments may play a role in the spread of multidrug-resistant bacteria in the community and pose a serious health risk to worshipers.

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August 2014
2 Reads

Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli in diarrheic children in Egypt: molecular characterization and antimicrobial susceptibility.

J Infect Dev Ctries 2014 May 14;8(5):589-96. Epub 2014 May 14.

Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Egypt.

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May 2014
7 Reads
2 Citations
1.270 Impact Factor

Nasal carriage of multi-drug resistant Panton-Valentine leucocidin-positive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in children in Tripoli-Libya.

Am J Trop Med Hyg 2014 Apr 3;90(4):724-7. Epub 2014 Feb 3.

Faculty of Pharmacy and Faculty of Medicine, University of Tripoli, Tripoli, Libya.

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April 2014
1 Read
3 Citations
2.700 Impact Factor

Antimicrobial resistance in Libya: 1970-2011.

Libyan J Med 2013 Mar 27;8:1-8. Epub 2013 Mar 27.

Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tripoli, Tripoli, Libya.

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March 2013
39 Reads
6 Citations

Cryptosporidium in countries of the Arab world: the past decade (2002-2011).

Libyan J Med 2012 27;7. Epub 2012 Nov 27.

Faculty of Medicine, University of Tripoli, Tripoli, Libya.

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December 2012
4 Reads
2 Citations

Molecular characterization of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli from Libya.

Am J Trop Med Hyg 2012 May;86(5):866-71

Department of Botany, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt.

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May 2012
11 Reads
7 Citations
2.700 Impact Factor

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in a tertiary surgical and trauma hospital in Benghazi, Libya.

J Infect Dev Ctries 2011 Oct 13;5(10):723-6. Epub 2011 Oct 13.

Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Garyounis University, Benghazi, Libya.

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October 2011
23 Reads
7 Citations
1.270 Impact Factor

Enteric pathogens associated with childhood diarrhea in Tripoli-Libya.

Am J Trop Med Hyg 2011 Jun;84(6):886-91

Departments of Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, Alfateh University, Tripoli, Libya.

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June 2011
3 Reads
15 Citations
2.700 Impact Factor

Rotavirus in children with diarrhea in Tripoli, Libya.

Libyan J Med 2011 Feb 18;6. Epub 2011 Feb 18.

School of Basic Sciences, Academy of Graduate Studies Tripoli, Libya.

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February 2011
1 Read
3 Citations

Isolation of antibiotic-resistant pathogenic and potentially pathogenic bacteria from carpets of mosques in Tripoli, Libya.

Libyan J Med 2010 Sep 13;5. Epub 2010 Sep 13.

Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, Al-Fateh University, Tripoli, Libya.

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September 2010
1 Read
1 Citation

Maternal and neonatal seroprevalence of Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) in Tripoli, Libya.

J Infect Dev Ctries 2010 Mar 29;4(3):168-70. Epub 2010 Mar 29.

Faculty of Sciences, Al-Fateh University, Tripoli, Libya.

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March 2010
1 Read
12 Citations
1.270 Impact Factor

Enteric fever in Mediterranean north Africa.

J Infect Dev Ctries 2009 Dec 15;3(10):753-61. Epub 2009 Dec 15.

Faculty of Medicine, Al-Fateh University of Medical Sciences, Tripoli, Libya.

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December 2009
4 Reads
3 Citations
1.270 Impact Factor

Uropathogens from diabetic patients in Libya: virulence factors and phylogenetic groups of Escherichia coli isolates.

J Med Microbiol 2009 Aug 15;58(Pt 8):1006-14. Epub 2009 Jun 15.

Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, Al-Fateh University for Medical Sciences, Tripoli, Libya.

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August 2009
4 Reads
7 Citations
2.250 Impact Factor

Aeromonas-associated infections in developing countries.

J Infect Dev Ctries 2008 Apr 1;2(2):81-98. Epub 2008 Apr 1.

Dept. of Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, Al-Fateh University, Tripoli, Libya.

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April 2008
13 Reads
13 Citations
1.270 Impact Factor

PCR detection of toxic shock syndrome toxin of Staphylococcus aureus from Tripoli, Libya.

J Med Microbiol 2006 Feb;55(Pt 2):179-82

Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Etövös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary.

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February 2006
7 Reads
4 Citations
2.250 Impact Factor