Publications by authors named "Khalid Naveed"

7 Publications

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Coronavirus and its terrifying inning around the globe: The pharmaceutical cares at the main frontline.

Chemosphere 2021 Feb 16;275:129968. Epub 2021 Feb 16.

Department of Agronomy, University of Haripur, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan. Electronic address:

A novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) is an acute life-threatening disease, emerged in China, which imposed a potentially immense toll in terms of public health emergency due to high infection rate and has a devastating economic impact that attracts the world's attention. After that, on January 30, 2020, it was officially declared as a global pandemic by World Health Organization (WHO). The International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) recognized it as a Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) and the disease named Coronavirus Disease-19 (COVID-19). Several studies have been ameliorated the active role of COVID-19 transmission, etiology, pathogenicity, and mortality rate as serious impact on human life. The symptoms of this disease may include fever, fatigue, cough and some peoples are severely prone to gastrointestinal infection. The elderly and seriously affected peoples are likely concerned with serious outcomes. In this review, we mainly aimed to provide a benchmark summary of the silent characteristics and findings of some candidates for antiviral drugs and immunotherapies such as plasma therapy, cytokine therapy, antibodies, intravenous immunoglobulin, and pharmaceutical health concerns that are related to this disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2021.129968DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7884917PMC
February 2021

First report of brown leaf spot of rice caused by Bipolaris zeicola in Pakistan.

Plant Dis 2020 Aug 17. Epub 2020 Aug 17.

University of Agriculture Faisalabad, 66724, Entomology, Faisalabad, Punjab, Pakistan;

Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is one of the highly consumed cereal grain crops in Pakistan. In September 2017, leaf samples of cultivar Basmati-385 showing brown to dark brown spots (5 to 9 mm in diameter) that were oval or cylindrical in shape with a chlorotic yellow halo and grayish tan centers were collected from fields near the University of Agriculture, Faisalabad (31.43633 N 73.05981 E). Average disease incidence was 69% in six rice fields that were sampled for diseased plants with visible symptoms. To isolate the pathogen, from 20 diseased leaves, 5 mm2 segments from the margins of lesions were cut, rinsed with sterile distilled water (SDW), surface disinfected by 70% ethanol and again rinsed with SDW. The samples were dried on sterilized filter paper discs, plated on potato dextrose agar (PDA) and incubated at 27°C for 5 to 7 days. Twelve isolates were sub-cultured and single-sporing was performed to obtain pure cultures. Fungal isolates with light to dark gray in color, thick or fluffy aerial mycelium, circular and smooth margins were obtained after 7 days of incubation. Conidia were 47-83 μm × 10-17 μm (n=100), with 4 to 10 distosepta, dark or olivaceous brown, straight or moderately curved, and the cells at the ends occasionally looked paler than those in the middle. Conidiophore of the fungus were simple, smooth, cylindrical, septate, and straight to flexuous. These characteristics resembled those of Bipolaris zeicola (Stout) Shoemaker (Manamgoda et al. 2014). For molecular identification, genomic DNA (isolate SU-11) was extracted and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region, large subunit (LSU) of ribosomal DNA, translation elongation factor (tef), glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gpd), and RNA polymerase II second largest subunit (rpb2) genes were amplified and sequenced by using the primers ITS1-F/ITS4-R (White et al. 1990), LROR-F/LR5-R (Schoch et al. 2012), EF1-983F/EF1-2218R (Rehner and Buckley 2005), GPD1F/GPD2R (Berbee et al. 1999), and 5F2/7CR (O'Donnell et al. 2007), respectively. BLASTn searches showed 100% homology with the LSU and rpb2 sequences of B. zeicola (GenBank Accession Nos. MH876201 and HF934842) and 98-99% similarity with ITS, tef, and gpd sequences of B. zeicola (GenBank Accession Nos. KM230398, KM093752 and KM034815). The sequences of ITS, LSU, tef, gpd, and rpb2 were deposited in GenBank with accession numbers MN871712, MN877767, MN867685, MN904511 and MT349837, respectively. To fulfill Koch's postulates, 25 greenhouse-grown rice plants (cv. Basmati-385) at 2- to 3-leaf stage were spray inoculated with a spore suspension (105 spores/ml; isolate SU-11) prepared in SDW. Plants were covered with plastic wraps to maintain humid conditions for 24 hours and incubated at 27°C for one week. Similarly, ten non-inoculated plants sprayed with SDW served as controls. After one week, observed symptoms were similar to those from natural infections and no disease symptoms were observed on the non-inoculated plants. The experiment was repeated twice and the pathogen was re-isolated from the infected leaves and characterized morphologically. Globally, B. zeicola has also been reported to cause the leaf spot of rice and maize plants (Sivanesan 1987; Kang et al. 2018). To our information, this is the first report of B. zeicola causing brown leaf spot of rice in Pakistan. The increasing risk of this fungal pathogen in the rice-growing areas of Pakistan need a rigorous exploration and outreach effort to develop effective management practices.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1094/PDIS-04-20-0838-PDNDOI Listing
August 2020

Complete Genome Sequence of the Type Strain Pectobacterium punjabense SS95, Isolated from a Potato Plant with Blackleg Symptoms.

Microbiol Resour Announc 2020 Aug 6;9(32). Epub 2020 Aug 6.

Institute for Integrative Biology of the Cell (I2BC), CEA CNRS University Paris-Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette, France

is a newly described species causing blackleg disease in potato plants. Therefore, by the combination of long (Oxford Nanopore Technologies, MinION) and short (Illumina MiSeq) reads, we sequenced the complete genome of SS95, which contains a circular chromosome of 4.793 Mb with a GC content of 50.7%.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/MRA.00420-20DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7409842PMC
August 2020

First record and taxonomic description of the genus (Fabricius) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae: Plusiinae) from Pakistan.

Saudi J Biol Sci 2020 May 13;27(5):1375-1379. Epub 2019 Dec 13.

Research Center for Advanced Materials Science (RCAMS), King Khalid University, P.O. Box 9004, Abha 61413, Saudi Arabia.

Species belonging to genus, Fabricius of the subfamily Plusiinae which are polyphagous in nature and pest of vegetables, foods, legumes, fodder, fruits, ornamental plants and cotton crops. Samples were collected from different localities of district Bahawalpur. For collection, comprehensive and comparative surveys were carried out during 2017-18 on taxonomic account of species of the genus Fabricius and resulted identified one species (Fabricius) first time from Pakistan. Morphological characters viz., vertex, frons, labial palpi, antennae, compound eyes, ocelli, proboscis, wing venation, male and female genital characteristics were used for the identification and classification. Dichotomous keys and photographs are also provided. There is hardly any substantial research work on taxonomic studies of subfamily Plusiinae Pakistan. So to fill this gap the present proposal was designed to study the diversity of Noctuid moths from Pakistan and very fruitful results have been obtained.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjbs.2019.12.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7182779PMC
May 2020

In vitro antimicrobial activities of different solvent extracted samples from Iris germinica.

Pak J Pharm Sci 2016 Jan;29(1):145-50

Department of Agriculture, University of Haripur, KPK, Pakistan.

Antibacterial and antifungal activities of different solvents extracted samples of Iris germinica were carried out through disc diffusion assay. For this purpose five different solvent extracts were prepared with two concentrations (1 and 2 mg disc(-1)) and their antimicrobial activity was tested using disc diffusion assay against eight pathogenic bacteria viz. Staphylococcus aureus, B. subtilis, Bacillus atrophaeus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Erwinia carotovara, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella typhi and one fungal specie (Candida albicans). Butanol and ethyl acetate fraction were more effective to control the growth of different pathogens followed by chloroform, hexane and aqueous fractions respectively. C. albicans, S. aureus E. carotovara, B. atrophaeus and E. coli were comparatively susceptible inhibited by all extracts of I. germinica compared with the rest of microbes. Maximum activity was shown by ethyl acetate extracted samples against B. atrophaeus followed by the same solvent against E. carotovara. Butanol extracted samples were effective against B. subtilis showing 62% reduction in growth at 1 or 2mg disc(-1) concentration. From these results it can be concluded that different solvent extracted samples from the leaves of I. germinica possess varying degree of antimicrobial against different micro-organisms and can be a good sources of antibiotics for the treatment of certain bacterial and fungal diseases.
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January 2016

Comparative analysis of virus-specific small RNA profiles of three biologically distinct strains of Potato virus Y in infected potato (Solanum tuberosum) cv. Russet Burbank.

Virus Res 2014 Oct 15;191:153-60. Epub 2014 Jul 15.

Department of Plant Pathology, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, USA. Electronic address:

Deep sequencing technology has enabled the analysis of small RNA profiles of virus-infected plants and could provide insights into virus-host interactions. Potato virus Y is an economically important viral pathogen of potato worldwide. In this study, we investigated the nature and relative levels of virus-derived small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs) in potato cv. Russet Burbank infected with three biologically distinct and economically important strains of PVY, the ordinary strain (PVY-O), tobacco veinal-necrotic strain (PVY-N) and tuber necrotic strain (PVY-NTN). The analysis showed an overall abundance of vsiRNAs of 20-24nt in PVY-infected plants. Considerable differences were present in the distribution of vsiRNAs as well as total small RNAs. The 21nt class was the most prevalent in PVY-infected plants irrespective of the virus strain, whereas in healthy potato plants, the 24nt class was the most dominant. vsiRNAs were derived from every position in the PVY genome, though certain hotspots were identified for each of the PVY strains. Among the three strains used, the population of vsiRNAs of different size classes was relatively different with PVY-NTN accumulating the highest level of vsiRNAs, while PVY-N infected plants had the least population of vsiRNAs. Unique vsiRNAs mapping to PVY genome in PVY-infected plants amounted to 3.13, 1.93 and 1.70% for NTN, N and O, respectively. There was a bias in the generation of vsiRNAs from the plus strand of the genome in comparison to the negative strand. The highest number of total vsiRNAs was from the cytoplasmic inclusion protein gene (CI) in PVY-O and PVY-NTN strains, whereas from PVY-N, the NIb gene produced maximum total vsiRNAs. These findings indicate that the three PVY strains interact differently in the same host genetic background and provided insights into virus-host interactions in an important food crop.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.virusres.2014.07.005DOI Listing
October 2014

Effect of seedling age and water depth on morphological and physiological aspects of transplanted rice under high temperature.

J Zhejiang Univ Sci B 2005 May;6(5):389-95

Agricultural Research Institute, Dera Ismail Khan, NWFP, Pakistan.

To study the effect of high temperature, rice seedlings 20, 30, 40 and 50 d were kept at 5, 10, 15 and 20 cm water depth in a water pool. Meteorological findings indicated that water temperature varied up to 10 cm but became stable below this depth. Deep water inflicted higher tiller mortality, minimal increase in dry weight of aerial parts and leaf area, decrease in root length, and decrease in root dry weight especially at 20 cm water depth and produced an unbalanced T/R ratio (top versus root dry weight). However, deep water tended to increase plant length. These parameters, however, excel in shallow water. Older seedlings, with the exception of root dry weight, could not perform well compared to young seedlings in all physiological and morphological aspects. The study revealed that seedlings, particularly young ones, stand well in shallow water and can cope with high temperature.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1631/jzus.2005.B0389DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1389756PMC
May 2005