Publications by authors named "Khaled A Mohran"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

First molecular analysis of rabies virus in Qatar and clinical cases imported into Qatar, a case report.

Int J Infect Dis 2020 Jul 4;96:323-326. Epub 2020 May 4.

Erasmus MC, Department of Viroscience, WHO collaborating centre for arbovirus and viral hemorrhagic fever Reference and Research, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

Identifying the origin of the rabies virus (RABV) infection may have significant implications for control measures. Here, we identified the source of a RABV infection of two Nepalese migrants in Qatar by comparing their RABV genomes with RABV genomes isolated from the brains of a RABV infected camel and fox from Qatar.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijid.2020.04.070DOI Listing
July 2020

Occupational Exposure to Dromedaries and Risk for MERS-CoV Infection, Qatar, 2013-2014.

Emerg Infect Dis 2015 Aug;21(8):1422-5

We determined the presence of neutralizing antibodies to Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus in persons in Qatar with and without dromedary contact. Antibodies were only detected in those with contact, suggesting dromedary exposure as a risk factor for infection. Findings also showed evidence for substantial underestimation of the infection in populations at risk in Qatar.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2108.150481DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4517733PMC
August 2015

High proportion of MERS-CoV shedding dromedaries at slaughterhouse with a potential epidemiological link to human cases, Qatar 2014.

Infect Ecol Epidemiol 2015 15;5:28305. Epub 2015 Jul 15.

Department of Viroscience, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Two of the earliest Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) cases were men who had visited the Doha central animal market and adjoining slaughterhouse in Qatar. We show that a high proportion of camels presenting for slaughter in Qatar show evidence for nasal MERS-CoV shedding (62/105). Sequence analysis showed the circulation of at least five different virus strains at these premises, suggesting that this location is a driver of MERS-CoV circulation and a high-risk area for human exposure. No correlation between RNA loads and levels of neutralizing antibodies was observed, suggesting limited immune protection and potential for reinfection despite previous exposure.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4505336PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/iee.v5.28305DOI Listing
July 2015

Isolation of MERS coronavirus from a dromedary camel, Qatar, 2014.

Emerg Infect Dis 2014 Aug;20(8):1339-42

We obtained the full genome of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) from a camel in Qatar. This virus is highly similar to the human England/Qatar 1 virus isolated in 2012. The MERS-CoV from the camel efficiently replicated in human cells, providing further evidence for the zoonotic potential of MERS-CoV from camels.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2008.140663DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4111206PMC
August 2014