Publications by authors named "Khadijah Mohideen"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Malondialdehyde, an Oxidative Stress Marker in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma-A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Curr Issues Mol Biol 2021 Aug 28;43(2):1019-1035. Epub 2021 Aug 28.

Division of Oral Pathology, Department of Maxillofacial Surgery and Diagnostic Sciences, College of Dentistry, Jazan University, Jazan 45142, Saudi Arabia.

Objective: To qualitative and quantitatively review published literature assessing the oxidative stress marker malondialdehyde (MDA) in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC).

Methodology: Pubmed (MeSH), Science Direct, Scopus, Web of Science, Willey Online Library, Cochrane, and Cross Reference were searched for studies assessing MDA levels in OSCC samples.

Results: From the 1008 articles identified, 849 were excluded based on title and abstract screening due to duplication and irrelevance to the topic of interest. Full-text assessment of the remaining 159 articles led to the inclusion of only 46 articles that satisfied the selection criteria. Of these, only 26 studies had data compatible for quantitative analysis. The MDA levels in OSCC groups are significantly increased ( < 0.00001) in plasma, serum, and saliva samples in the majority of the studies evaluated. In contrast, MDA levels in OSCC tissue samples are significantly attenuated ( < 0.00001) compared to healthy controls, supported by fewer studies.

Conclusions: The augmented MDA levels in plasma, serum, and saliva samples of the OSCC reflect the heightened oxidative stress level accurately. Further studies are required to understand the attenuated MDA levels in the tissue samples of OSCC. Correlation analysis between MDA levels with established clinicopathological prognostic markers could aid in formulating oxidative stress-based prognostication and treatment planning.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/cimb43020072DOI Listing
August 2021

The Knowledge and Awareness of Medical Emergencies and Management among Dental Students.

J Pharm Bioallied Sci 2021 Jun 5;13(Suppl 1):S741-S747. Epub 2021 Jun 5.

General Dentist, Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

Background: Every dentist should anticipate being confronted with a medical emergency (ME), and one should always be ready to treat the most catastrophic ones.

Aim: This study aimed to assess the knowledge of dental clinical students of Tamil Nadu in the ME understanding and management to create awareness toward patient care.

Methodology: A total of 768 dental students, including final-year students and residents from different colleges, took part in the questionnaire-based cross-sectional study. The selection of study participants was by the convenience sampling method. The questionnaire contained thirty closed multiple-choice questions to assess their knowledge of MEs. Microsoft Office Excel software was used for compiling the answers. The descriptive analysis of the data is exhibited in graphs.

Results: The majority of participants were mindful of the vital signs; only 55% of the participants know the importance of checking their respiration rate. The knowledge of identifying MEs such as anaphylaxis was 91%, and only 27%-37% of the respondents knew to identify angina, transient ischemia, and lidocaine toxicity. Approximately 15%-40% of the respondents only knew the management of angina, cardiac arrest, hyperventilation, respiratory obstruction, and seizure. Only 10% agreed that the best office emergency kit should be prepared by themselves. Roughly 78% of the respondents were conscious of the patient's referral whenever necessary and aware of state dental acts.

Conclusion: This study reflects a significant need for training in executing ME among dental students who are to transmute into future dental professionals.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/jpbs.JPBS_559_20DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8375915PMC
June 2021

Assessment of Salivary Cortisol Concentrations as a Level of Stress Indicator among Individuals Undergoing Dental Extraction Procedure.

J Pharm Bioallied Sci 2021 Jun 5;13(Suppl 1):S735-S740. Epub 2021 Jun 5.

General Dentist, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India.

Background: Anxious patients tend to exaggerate the aversive events before the actual dental therapy. The anxiety and fear are the major factors that regulate cortisol levels.

Aim: Our study aims to estimate the salivary cortisol among patients subjected to dental extraction and correlate any existence between pre- and post-extraction cortisol levels and vital parameters compared to the control group.

Methodology: The study sample included sixty individuals, thirty patients indicated for a dental extraction, and thirty healthy patients between the ages of 18 and 60 years. We collected saliva samples from the control group and pre- and post-extraction samples from the study group participants and vital parameters. We used quantitative ELISA Kit, Diagnostics Biochem Canada Inc. (DBC), to estimate the salivary cortisol level. We evaluated the values using the Chi-square test, Pearson correlation test, and paired -test using the JMP 15; JMP Pro, Version 15 (SAS) Microsoft Windows for × 64.

Results: The mean value of cortisol concentration of saliva was significantly greater in the preextraction group (6.13 ± 0.53 μg/dl) than after extraction group (3.17 ± 0.14 μg/dl) ( < 0.001). There were no significant associations between hemodynamic parameters and salivary cortisol concentration except for the postextraction systolic blood pressure (BP). A comparison of hemodynamic parameters between the study and control group revealed substantial differences in systolic BP.

Conclusion: The patient's anticipation and anxiety toward dental therapy elevate the cortisol level. Dental surgeons should treat the patients more conveniently and effectively without any strains and provide a comfortable atmosphere to avoid stress-related consequences.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/jpbs.JPBS_557_20DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8375931PMC
June 2021

A Meta-Analysis in Assessing Oxidative Stress Using Malondialdehyde in Oral Submucous Fibrosis.

Eur J Dent 2021 Aug 24. Epub 2021 Aug 24.

Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, Bharath Institute of Higher Education and Research, Sree Balaji Dental College and Hospital, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India.

Objective:  This study aims to evaluate the oxidative stress marker Malondialdehyde (MDA) in oral submucous fibrosis with available literature.

Materials And Methods:  We conducted a literature search electronically in PubMed (MeSH), Science Direct, Scopus, and Google Scholar using specific keywords.

Results:  A systematic search in PubMed, Science Direct, and Google Scholar identified 334 articles. Of these, four were duplicate reports, and three were animal studies. After reading the abstracts of the collected articles, 288 articles were excluded for the following reasons: low quality, not relevant to the research question, or did not meet the inclusion criteria. The remaining 46 articles were chosen for full-text assessment. Finally, the present qualitative synthesis included 23 articles for evaluation. The selected studies in MDA analysis in a random-effects model showed higher heterogeneity (Q = 477.636, < 0.001, I = 95.394%). The standard difference in mean MDA concentration between oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) and healthy subjects was estimated as 2.73 nmol/mL (95% confidence interval: 2.08-3.38).

Conclusion:  The selected studies showed significantly higher MDA levels in various biological samples of patients with OSMF. Therefore, further studies are needed to estimate oxidative stress levels by using different biomarkers in OSMF to direct future therapy.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0041-1728230DOI Listing
August 2021

Meta-analysis on risk factors of squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue in young adults.

J Oral Maxillofac Pathol 2019 Sep-Dec;23(3):450-457

Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, Sree Balaji Dental College and Hospital, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India.

Tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC) generally affects the older age group exposed to tobacco for an extended period. However, recent research points out that there is an increased incidence of TSCC in the younger age group without any traditional risk factors making TSCC as a distinct biological entity in this group. This study aims to assess the prevalence and risk factors of tongue carcinoma in the younger group of patients. This article included studies that addressed the TSCC involving young patients and that which are PubMed indexed. Initially, 390 articles were considered; but after refined evaluation, 123 articles had their titles and abstracts matching to this present work. After the extraction of the case reports, review articles and the articles without the assessment of the parameter of harmful habits, we have included only 23 articles in the sample matching the title. The statistical analysis was formed by using chi-square tests using IBM SPSS ver. 20.0. The cohort of the younger population in these studies was mostly in the 35- to the 45-year age group. The majority of reports (64%) classified the patients below 40 years of age as a young group. Though male predominance is reported to be 55%, female patients are also more affected (40%) in the younger age group compared with, the more typical and usual group of head and neck carcinoma patients. TSCC in older adults predominantly reported in tobacco users (70%) whereas in young adults, TSCC was associated with a higher incidence in nonsmokers (53%); the causes of these cancers in young adults remain unclear. The identification of the potential risk factors aside from traditional factors is vital to control the incidence of TSCC in young patients.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/jomfp.JOMFP_118_19DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6948024PMC
January 2020

Autofluorescence based diagnostic techniques for oral cancer.

J Pharm Bioallied Sci 2015 Aug;7(Suppl 2):S374-7

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Malabar Dental College and Research Centre, Malappuram, Kerala, India.

Oral cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide. Despite of various advancements in the treatment modalities, oral cancer mortalities are more, particularly in developing countries like India. This is mainly due to the delay in diagnosis of oral cancer. Delay in diagnosis greatly reduces prognosis of the treatment and also cause increased morbidity and mortality rates. Early diagnosis plays a key role in effective management of oral cancer. A rapid diagnostic technique can greatly aid in the early diagnosis of oral cancer. Now a day's many adjunctive oral cancer screening techniques are available for the early diagnosis of cancer. Among these, autofluorescence based diagnostic techniques are rapidly emerging as a powerful tool. These techniques are broadly discussed in this review.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0975-7406.163456DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4606622PMC
August 2015

The role of myofibroblasts in wound healing, contraction and its clinical implications in cleft palate repair.

J Int Oral Health 2015 Mar;7(3):75-80

Senior Lecturer, Department of Oral Pathology, Sathyabama University Dental College and Hospital, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India.

Myofibroblasts after its discovery in 1971 as the principal cell for wound healing has come a long way as far as research is concerned. The primary focus of research has been regarding preventing certain unwanted effects of this cell such as wound contraction and scarring. As far as the oral and maxillofacial region is concerned, the primary concern of this untoward effect is during repair of cleft palate surgically which results impaired development of palate and the dentoalveolar structures. This review focuses on the basic aspects of myofibroblasts such as its origin, formation, function in wound healing, role in wound contraction and ways by which its unwanted effects can be overcome to improve the quality of the post surgical complications of cleft palate surgery.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4385733PMC
March 2015

Cherubism combined with epilepsy, mental retardation and gingival fibromatosis (Ramon syndrome): a case report.

Head Neck Pathol 2010 Jun 11;4(2):126-31. Epub 2009 Dec 11.

Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Tamil Nadu Government Dental College and Hospital, Chennai, 600 003, India.

Cherubism is an inherited, autosomal dominant disorder that characteristically affects the jaws of children. The disease typically manifest as a bilateral swelling with associated submandibular lymph node enlargements and usually regresses as age advances. The disease is microscopically indistinguishable from other giant cell lesions and is essentially a clinical diagnosis. The association of cherubism with gingival fibromatosis, epilepsy, mental retardation, stunted growth, and hypertrichosis is referred as Ramon syndrome. We report a case of Ramon syndrome in an 8 year old girl.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12105-009-0155-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2878617PMC
June 2010
-->