Publications by authors named "Kevin L Salyers"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Evaluation of matrix microsampling methods for therapeutic drug candidate quantification in discovery-stage rodent pharmacokinetic studies.

Bioanalysis 2014 Aug;6(16):2135-46

Department of Pharmacokinetics & Drug Metabolism, Amgen, Inc., Thousand Oaks, CA 91320, USA.

Background: AMG 517 or 1-aminobenzotriazole were quantified by LC-MS/MS from low blood/plasma volumes for rat pharmacokinetic (PK) characterization in order to qualify manual/automated dried blood spot (DBS) sampling and plasma separation capillary sampling. In addition, mouse serial automated blood sampling was compared with standard composite sampling.

Materials & Methods: AMG 517 or 1-aminobenzotriazole was administered to rats or mice and multiple microsampling techniques were used to obtain blood or plasma.

Results: PK parameters derived from DBS and whole blood-obtained drug concentrations were within 7% for manual DBS and 20% for automated DBS. Plasma PK parameters derived from capillary or standard plasma-obtained drug concentrations differed by 6%. Plasma PK parameters obtained from serial automated blood sampling or manual composite sampling were within 20%.

Conclusion: Collectively, these results suggest that the microsampling applications that were investigated are attractive approaches for quantifying drug candidates in low matrix volumes that can be successfully employed within discovery-stage rodent PK studies.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4155/bio.14.184DOI Listing
August 2014

Urotensin-II receptor antagonists: synthesis and SAR of N-cyclic azaalkyl benzamides.

Bioorg Med Chem Lett 2008 Jul 10;18(14):3950-4. Epub 2008 Jun 10.

Centers of Excellence for Drug Discovery, GlaxoSmithKline, 709 Swedeland Road, King of Prussia, PA 19406, USA.

SAR exploration of the central diamine, benzyl, and terminal aminoalkoxy regions of the N-cyclic azaalkyl benzamide series led to the identification of very potent human urotensin-II receptor antagonists such as 1a with a K(i) of 4 nM. The synthesis and structure-activity relationships (SAR) of N-cyclic azaalkyl benzamides are described.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bmcl.2008.06.019DOI Listing
July 2008

Comparison of N,N'-diarylsquaramides and N,N'-diarylureas as antagonists of the CXCR2 chemokine receptor.

Bioorg Med Chem Lett 2007 Mar 23;17(6):1713-7. Epub 2006 Dec 23.

GlaxoSmithKline, 709 Swedeland Road, King of Prussia, PA 19406, USA.

N,N'-diarylsquaramides were prepared and evaluated as antagonists of CXCR2. The compounds were found to be potent and selective antagonists of CXCR2. Significant differences in SAR was observed relative to the previously described N,N'-diarylurea series. As was the case in the N,N'-diarylurea series, placing sulfonamide substituent adjacent to the acidic phenol significantly reduced the clearance in rat pharmacokinetic studies.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bmcl.2006.12.067DOI Listing
March 2007

Phenylbutyrates as potent, orally bioavailable vitronectin receptor (integrin alphavbeta3) antagonists.

Bioorg Med Chem Lett 2003 Apr;13(8):1483-6

GlaxoSmithKline Pharmaceuticals, 1250 S. Collegeville Rd., PO Box 5089, PA 19426, USA.

In our continuing efforts to identify small molecule vitronectin receptor antagonists, we have discovered a series of phenylbutyrate derivatives, exemplified by 16, which have good potency and excellent oral bioavailability (approximately 100% in rats). This new series is derived conceptually from opening of the seven-membered ring of SB-265123.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0960-894x(03)00102-1DOI Listing
April 2003

Discovery of a novel and potent class of FabI-directed antibacterial agents.

Antimicrob Agents Chemother 2002 10;46(10):3118-24

Microbial, Musculoskeletal and Proliferative Diseases Center of Excellence in Drug Discovery, GlaxoSmithKline Pharmaceuticals, Collegeville, Pennsylvania 19426, USA.

Bacterial enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase (FabI) catalyzes the final step in each elongation cycle of bacterial fatty acid biosynthesis and is an attractive target for the development of new antibacterial agents. High-throughput screening of the Staphylococcus aureus FabI enzyme identified a novel, weak inhibitor with no detectable antibacterial activity against S. aureus. Iterative medicinal chemistry and X-ray crystal structure-based design led to the identification of compound 4 [(E)-N-methyl-N-(2-methyl-1H-indol-3-ylmethyl)-3-(7-oxo-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-1,8-naphthyridin-3-yl)acrylamide], which is 350-fold more potent than the original lead compound obtained by high-throughput screening in the FabI inhibition assay. Compound 4 has exquisite antistaphylococci activity, achieving MICs at which 90% of isolates are inhibited more than 500 times lower than those of nine currently available antibiotics against a panel of multidrug-resistant strains of S. aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. Furthermore, compound 4 exhibits excellent in vivo efficacy in an S. aureus infection model in rats. Biochemical and genetic approaches have confirmed that the mode of antibacterial action of compound 4 and related compounds is via inhibition of FabI. Compound 4 also exhibits weak FabK inhibitory activity, which may explain its antibacterial activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae and Enterococcus faecalis, which depend on FabK and both FabK and FabI, respectively, for their enoyl-ACP reductase function. These results show that compound 4 is representative of a new, totally synthetic series of antibacterial agents that has the potential to provide novel alternatives for the treatment of S. aureus infections that are resistant to our present armory of antibiotics.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC128775PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/aac.46.10.3118-3124.2002DOI Listing
October 2002