Publications by authors named "Kevin L Blankenship"

5 Publications

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Values, inter-attitudinal structure, and attitude change: value accessibility can increase a related attitude's resistance to change.

Pers Soc Psychol Bull 2015 Dec;41(12):1739-50

Iowa State University, Ames, USA.

Accessibility is one of the most basic structural properties of an attitude and an important factor to consider in attitude strength. Despite its importance, relatively little work has examined the role of attitude accessibility in an inter-attitudinal context, particularly as it relates to the strength of related attitudes in the network. The present research examines accessibility as a property of one attitude (toward an abstract goal or end-state, that is, a value) that might influence the strength of a different but related attitude (toward a social policy conceptually related to the value). In Study 1, a highly accessible evaluative component of a value increased resistance to change of attitudes and behavioral intentions toward a social policy related to that value. Similarly, a manipulation of value accessibility (Studies 2 and 3) led to increased resistance of attitudes and behavioral intentions toward a social policy related to that value. Implications for the role of accessibility in inter-attitudinal strength are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146167215609063DOI Listing
December 2015

Driving anger and metacognition: the role of thought confidence on anger and aggressive driving intentions.

Aggress Behav 2013 Jul-Aug;39(4):323-34. Epub 2013 Apr 16.

Department of Psychology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011, USA.

The present studies examined the self-validating role of anger within provoking driving situations, using a scenario method. Specifically, we predicted that one reason for why individuals higher (rather than lower) in trait driving anger are more likely to aggress when provoked is because these individuals are more confident in their thoughts resulting from the provocation. Higher thought confidence, in turn, may influence the amount of anger experienced and the extent to which the anger translates into aggressive behavior. Study 1 found that participants higher in driving anger were more confident in their thoughts in a provoking situation and their thought confidence mediated the effect of trait driving anger on anger in response to the provocation. Using a manipulation of consistency, Study 2 found that thought confidence mediated the influence of anger on aggressive driving intentions, but only for individuals higher in driving anger. The current research adds to the growing work examining a new mechanism by which emotion (e.g., anger) can affect behavior.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ab.21484DOI Listing
October 2013

The influence of just-world beliefs on driving anger and aggressive driving intentions.

Aggress Behav 2012 Sep-Oct;38(5):389-402. Epub 2012 Jul 9.

Department of Psychology, University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, Iowa, USA.

Decades of research demonstrate that the extent to which one believes the world is just can have important interpersonal consequences. Unfortunately, most of the commonly studied consequences are negative in nature. Guided by previous research demonstrating the buffering effect of just-world beliefs and anger, the present research explores how belief in a just world (BJW) may mitigate anger in the domain of driving anger and examines the limiting conditions of this effect. Study 1 demonstrated the expected negative relation between common measures of BJW and anger expression in a driving context. Study 2 found that the buffering effects of just-world beliefs and driver aggression were greater when BJW was violated (vs. not). Study 3 replicated the effects on aggression and anger and established a mediational role of anger on the buffering effects of just-world beliefs on thoughts and driver aggression.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ab.21439DOI Listing
January 2013

Circumventing resistance: using values to indirectly change attitudes.

J Pers Soc Psychol 2012 Oct 2;103(4):606-21. Epub 2012 Jul 2.

Department of Psychology, Iowa State University, W112 Lagomarcino Hall, Ames, IA 50011, USA.

Most research on persuasion examines messages that directly address the attitude of interest. However, especially when message recipients are inclined to resist change, indirect methods might be more effective. Because values are rarely attacked and defended, value change could serve as a useful indirect route for attitude change. Attitudes toward affirmative action changed more when the value of equality was attacked (indirect change) than when affirmative action was directly attacked using the same message (Experiments 1-2). Changes in confidence in the value were responsible for the indirect change when the value was attacked (controlling for changes in favorability toward the value), whereas direct counterarguments to the message were responsible for the relative lack of change when the attitude was attacked directly (Experiment 2). Attacking the value of equality influenced attitudes toward policies related to the value but left policy attitudes unrelated to the value unchanged (Experiment 3). Finally, a manipulation of value confidence that left attitudes toward the value intact demonstrated similar confidence-based influences on policies related to the value of freedom (Experiment 4). Undermined value confidence also resulted in less confidence in the resulting policy attitudes controlling for the changes in the policy attitudes themselves (Experiments 3 and 4). Therefore, indirect change through value attacks presented a double threat--to both the policy attitudes and the confidence with which those policy attitudes were held (potentially leaving them open to additional influence).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0029226DOI Listing
October 2012

Opening the mind to close it: considering a message in light of important values increases message processing and later resistance to change.

J Pers Soc Psychol 2008 Feb;94(2):196-213

Department of Psychology, California State University, Fresno, Fresno, CA 97340, USA.

Past research showed that considering a persuasive message in light of important rather than unimportant values creates attitudes that resist later attack. The traditional explanation is that the attitudes come to express the value or that a cognitive link between the value and attitude enhances resistance. However, the current research showed that another explanation is plausible. Similar to other sources of involvement, considering important rather than unimportant values increases processing of the message considered in light of those values. This occurs when the values are identified as normatively high or low in importance and when the perceived importance differs across participants for the same values. The increase in processing creates resistance to later attacks, and unlike past research, individual-level measures of initial amount of processing mediate value importance effects on later resistance to change. Important values motivate processing because they increase personal involvement with the issue, rather than creating attitudes that represent or express core values.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0022-3514.94.2.94.2.196DOI Listing
February 2008