Publications by authors named "Kerstin Fey"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

ECEIM consensus statement on equine metabolic syndrome.

J Vet Intern Med 2019 Mar 6;33(2):335-349. Epub 2019 Feb 6.

Equine Clinic, Internal Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Justus-Liebig-University of Giessen, Giessen, Germany.

Equine metabolic syndrome (EMS) is a widely recognized collection of risk factors for endocrinopathic laminitis. The most important of these risk factors is insulin dysregulation (ID). Clinicians and horse owners must recognize the presence of these risk factors so that they can be targeted and controlled to reduce the risk of laminitis attacks. Diagnosis of EMS is based partly on the horse's history and clinical examination findings, and partly on laboratory testing. Several choices of test exist which examine different facets of ID and other related metabolic disturbances. EMS is controlled mainly by dietary strategies and exercise programs that aim to improve insulin regulation and decrease obesity where present. In some cases, pharmacologic aids might be useful. Management of an EMS case is a long-term strategy requiring diligence and discipline by the horse's carer and support and guidance from their veterinarians.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jvim.15423DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6430910PMC
March 2019

A Fluorescent Benzo[g]isoquinoline-Based HIF Prolyl Hydroxylase Inhibitor for Cellular Imaging.

ChemMedChem 2019 01 21;14(1):94-99. Epub 2018 Dec 21.

Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy, Inorganic and Organometallic Chemistry, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Egerlandstraße 1, 91058, Erlangen, Germany.

Prolyl hydroxylation domain (PHD) enzymes catalyze the hydroxylation of the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) and serve as cellular oxygen sensors. HIF and the PHD enzymes regulate numerous potentially tissue-protective target genes which can adapt cells to metabolic and ischemic stress. We describe a fluorescent PHD inhibitor (1-chloro-4-hydroxybenzo[g]isoquinoline-3-carbonyl)glycine which is suited to fluorescence-based detection assays and for monitoring PHD inhibitors in biological systems. In cell-based assays, application of the fluorescent PHD inhibitor allowed co-localization with a cellular PHD enzyme and led to live cell imaging of processes involved in cellular oxygen sensing.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cmdc.201800483DOI Listing
January 2019

Postoperative complications in equine elective, clean orthopaedic surgery with/without antibiotic prophylaxis.

Tierarztl Prax Ausg G Grosstiere Nutztiere 2018 Apr 4;46(2):81-86. Epub 2018 May 4.

Objective: Retrospective analysis of postoperative complications in equines after clean, orthopaedic surgical procedures in order to detect differences between animals treated with antibiotics and horses without receiving these drugs.

Material And Methods: Details on 652 patients, surgical procedures and surgery-associated complications were compiled from horses being operated between June 2011 and January 2015. Antibiotic-receiving patients (n = 259) were tested for differences in complication rates and characteristics to controls (n = 393).

Results: The total complication rate was 39.1 %. Increased swelling was observed most often (25.6 %), followed by exudation (7.5 %), fever without incisional alterations (2.3 %), suture dehiscence (1.8 %), and seroma (0.8 %). Seven patients (five treated, two controls) developed septic arthritis within a total of 463 arthroscopies (1.5 %). There were no significant differences in the development of postoperative complications, which were seen in 97/259 (37.5 %) antibiotic receiving patients and in 158/393 (40.2 %) controls. The application of perioperative antibiotics was significantly influenced by surgeon (p < 0.0001) and type of surgery (p = 0.0007) and increased with the number of surgical lesions (p = 0.03). In patients undergoing tendovaginoscopy/ bursoscopy, fasciotomy and neurectomy (n = 98), antibiotic prophylaxis was initiated less frequently than in other surgeries, e. g. combinations of surgeries, splint bone extraction, tenotomy, and arthroscopy (n = 554).

Conclusion: Severe complications in equine clean orthopaedic surgery are rare and complication rates in patients either receiving perioperative antibiotics or not were not significantly different.

Clinical Relevance: Based on the results the use of antibiotics appears to be non-essential in uncomplicated elective orthopaedic interventions in the horse.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.15653/TPG-170491DOI Listing
April 2018

[Thrombocytopenia in horses].

Tierarztl Prax Ausg G Grosstiere Nutztiere 2018 Apr 4;46(2):73-79. Epub 2018 May 4.

Objective: The retrospective study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of true thrombocytopenia and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)-induced pseudothrombocytopenia in horses and ponies and to assess the diagnostic and prognostic utility of true thrombocytopenia.

Material And Methods: In 3592 patients (2008-2015) hematological data (ADVIA® 2120, Siemens) were reviewed. Inclusion criteria were platelet counts < 90 x 109/l (EDTA-blood) and/or < 84 x 109/l (citrate blood). Thrombocytopenia was classified as true, EDTA-induced, and questionable. Patients with true thrombocytopenia were assigned to nine groups according to their history and four groups depending on the main diagnosis (inflammatory disorders, neoplasia, non-inflammatory intestinal disease, others). The frequencies of diagnoses were compared to the overall clinic population.

Results: Thrombocytopenia was diagnosed in 123/3592 patients (3.4 %) and classified as true in 60/123 (49 %), EDTA-induced in 6/123 (5 %), and questionable in 57/123 (46 %) of cases. In true thrombocytopenia, the most common reasons for referral were lethargy (23/60, 38 %), fever (19/60, 32 %), and colic (17/60, 28 %). In these patients inflammation, neoplasia, non-inflammatory intestinal disease, and others were diagnosed in 25/60 (42 %), 11/60 (18 %), 10/60 (17 %), and 14/60 (23 %) of cases, respectively. Compared with the overall clinic population, there was an increased frequency of neoplasia (18 % versus 1 %). The mortality rate was significantly higher at 38 % in comparison with the overall population. Remarkably high mortality rates of 32 % and 82 % were observed in patients with inflammatory and neoplastic diseases, respectively.

Conclusion And Clinical Relevance: True thrombocytopenia is relatively rare in horses with internal medical conditions and should be verified by measurement in samples with citrate as anticoagulant. Thrombocytopenia is rarely the primary reason for referral and is a negative prognostic factor in neoplastic and inflammatory diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.15653/TPG-170429DOI Listing
April 2018

Prevention of equine herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy - Is heparin a novel option? A case report.

Tierarztl Prax Ausg G Grosstiere Nutztiere 2016 Oct 21;44(5):313-317. Epub 2016 Sep 21.

Dr. Jasmin Walter, Klinik für Reproduktionsmedizin, Vetsuisse-Fakultät der Universität Zürich, Winterthurerstrasse 260, 8057 Zürich, Schweiz, E-Mail:

Equine herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy (EHM) is a severe manifestation of equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) infection. Prevention and treatment of EHM during EHV-1 outbreaks is critical, but no reliable and tested specific medication is available. Due to the thromboischemic nature of EHM and due to the fact that EHV-1 entry in cells is blocked by heparin, it was hypothesized that this compound may be useful in reduction of EHM incidence and severity. Therefore, during an acute EHV-1 outbreak with the neuropathogenic G/D Pol variant, metaphylactic treatment with heparin to prevent EHM was initiated. Clinical signs were present in 61 horses (fever n = 55; EHM n = 8; abortion n = 6). Heparin (25000 IU subcutaneously twice daily for 3 days) was given to 31 febrile horses from day 10 of the outbreak, while the first 30 horses exhibiting fever remained untreated. Treatment outcome was analyzed retrospectively. Heparin-treated horses showed a lower EHM incidence (1/31; 3.2%) than untreated horses (7/30; 23.3%; p = 0.03). Results indicate that heparin may be useful for prevention of EHM during an EHV-1 outbreak. These promising data highlight the need for randomized and possibly blinded studies for the use of heparin in EHV-1 outbreaks.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.15653/TPG-150451DOI Listing
October 2016

Clinical observations and management of a severe equine herpesvirus type 1 outbreak with abortion and encephalomyelitis.

Acta Vet Scand 2013 Mar 5;55:19. Epub 2013 Mar 5.

Klinik für Reproduktionsmedizin, Vetsuisse-Fakultät Universität Zürich, Winterthurerstrasse 260, 8057, Zurich, Switzerland.

Latent equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) infection is common in horse populations worldwide and estimated to reach a prevalence nearing 90% in some areas. The virus causes acute outbreaks of disease that are characterized by abortion and sporadic cases of myeloencephalopathy (EHM), both severe threats to equine facilities. Different strains vary in their abortigenic and neuropathogenic potential and the simultaneous occurrence of EHM and abortion is rare. In this report, we present clinical observations collected during an EHV-1 outbreak caused by a so-called "neuropathogenic" EHV-1 G(2254)/D(752) polymerase (Pol) variant, which has become more prevalent in recent years and is less frequently associated with abortions. In this outbreak with 61 clinically affected horses, 6/7 pregnant mares aborted and 8 horses developed EHM. Three abortions occurred after development of EHM symptoms. Virus detection was performed by nested PCR targeting gB from nasal swabs (11 positive), blood serum (6 positive) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (9 positive) of a total of 42 horses sampled. All 6 fetuses tested positive for EHV-1 by PCR and 4 by virus isolation. Paired serum neutralization test (SNT) on day 12 and 28 after the index case showed a significant (≥ 4-fold) increase in twelve horses (n = 42; 28.6%). This outbreak with abortions and EHM cases on a single equine facility provided a unique opportunity for the documentation of clinical disease progression as well as diagnostic procedures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1751-0147-55-19DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3630004PMC
March 2013

Chlamydophila spp. infection in horses with recurrent airway obstruction: similarities to human chronic obstructive disease.

Respir Res 2008 Jan 29;9:14. Epub 2008 Jan 29.

Institute of Pathology and Neuropathology, University Duisburg-Essen Medical School, Hufelandstr, 55, D-45122 Essen, Germany.

Background: Recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) in horses is a naturally occurring dust-induced disease mainly characterized by bronchiolitis which shows histological and pathophysiological similarities to human chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In human COPD previous investigations indicated an association with Chlamydophila psittaci infection. The present study was designed (1) to clarify a possible role of this infectious agent in RAO and (2) to investigate the suitability of this equine disorder as a model for human COPD.

Methods: Clinico-pathological parameters of a total of 45 horses (25 horses with clinical signs of RAO and 20 clinically healthy controls) were compared to histological findings in lung tissue samples and infection by Chlamydiaceae using light microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and PCR.

Results: Horses with clinical signs of RAO vs. controls revealed more inflammatory changes in histology (p = 0.01), and a higher detection rate of Chlamydia psittaci antigens in all cells (p < 0.001) and bronchiolar epithelial cells alone (p < 0.001) by immunohistochemistry. The abundance of chlamydial inclusions increased with the severity of disease. PCR was positive in 60% of horses with RAO vs. 45% of the controls (p = 0.316). OmpA sequencing identified Chlamydophila psittaci (n = 9) and Chlamydophila abortus (n = 13) in both groups with no significant differences. Within the group of clinically healthy horses subgroups with no changes (n = 15) and slight inflammation of the small airways (n = 5) were identified. Also in the group of animals with RAO subgroups with slight (n = 16) and severe (n = 9) bronchiolitis could be formed. These four subgroups can be separated in parts by the number of cells positive for Chlamydia psittaci antigens.

Conclusion: Chlamydophila psittaci or abortus were present in the lung of both clinically healthy horses and those with RAO. Immunohistochemistry revealed acute chlamydial infections with inflammation in RAO horses, whereas in clinically healthy animals mostly persistent chlamydial infection and no inflammatory reactions were seen. Stable dust as the known fundamental abiotic factor in RAO is comparable to smoking in human disease. These results show that RAO can be used as a model for human COPD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1465-9921-9-14DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2276488PMC
January 2008