Publications by authors named "Kentaro Sonoki"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

An Isolated Iliac Wing Stress Fracture in a Male Marathon Runner: A Case Report.

JBJS Case Connect 2021 04 19;11(2). Epub 2021 Apr 19.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, Japan.

Case: A 49-year-old man, who had started jogging 3 months before his first participation in a marathon race, presented with acute pain and difficulty walking that began during the marathon race. Tumors and bone metabolism factors were ruled out by blood examination and various imaging findings. Isolated iliac wing fatigue fracture was diagnosed and treated with conservative therapy.

Conclusion: This is the first English-literature report we know of an isolated iliac wing stress fracture in a male marathon runner without underlying disease. Our study highlights the importance of considering this rare fracture when diagnosing patients presenting with iliac pain.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2106/JBJS.CC.20.00541DOI Listing
April 2021

Novel Surgical Procedure for Half Palmaris Longus Transfer during Opponensplasty of the Thumb for Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Technical Note.

J Nippon Med Sch 2021 May 1;88(2):149-153. Epub 2020 Aug 1.

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nippon Medical School Hospital.

Thumb opposition is an essential movement for daily use of the hand, including precise pinching/grasping and fine and complicated hand movement. Although studies have reported use of several donor tendons for opponensplasty, opponensplasty using the palmaris longus (i.e., Camitz opponensplasty) has been used in patients with loss of opposition function due to longstanding carpal tunnel syndrome. The procedure involves a simple, useful tendon transfer and does not cause functional deficits. To obtain enough length to transfer the tendon to the metacarpophalangeal joint of the thumb, the PL tendon should be obtained with the palmar aponeurosis. However, the palmar aponeurosis is not always available for opponensplasty, as it is occasionally thin and insufficient for elongation of the palmaris longus. An extended skin incision over the palm can cause painful scar formation and postoperative residual pain. This procedure restores the palmar abduction function of the thumb but not opposition function. In the present article, we describe a modification of Camitz opponensplasty that uses a half-split palmaris longus, which is long enough to anchor to the insertion of the adductor pollicis at the metacarpophalangeal joint of the thumb.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1272/jnms.JNMS.2020_88-206DOI Listing
May 2021

Tarsal Navicular Stress Fracture in a Young Athlete: A Case Report.

J Nippon Med Sch 2019 ;86(2):122-125

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nippon Medical School Hospital.

Approximately 30% of tarsal navicular stress fractures are missed by physicians because plain radiographs often show no diagnostic clues. If early diagnosis and treatment are not obtained, such fractures will become refractory and the patient will no longer be able to actively participate as an athlete. We herein describe our experience treating a 14-year-old female track sprinter with persistent foot pain. Magnetic resonance imaging 6 months after the onset of pain showed a stress fracture of the tarsal navicular bone. Computed tomography showed the tarsal navicular stress fracture as well as sclerosis at the fracture edges. We diagnosed a refractory tarsal navicular stress fracture. Conservative management in the form of non-weight-bearing cast immobilization is the standard treatment for both partial and complete stress fractures of the tarsal navicular bone. However, surgical treatment is required in refractory cases. We treated the herein-described refractory case with 6 weeks of non-weight-bearing cast immobilization. We instructed the patient to perform quad muscle training at the same time as casting. Six weeks later, follow-up computed tomography showed callus formation and disappearance of the fracture line. The patient thus began full weight bearing with daily use of arch support equipment, and we allowed her to gradually return to sports. We gradually increased her activity intensity from jogging to running. She completely and successfully returned to sports after 3 months of treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1272/jnms.JNMS.2019_86-208DOI Listing
November 2019

Trans-scaphoid Perilunate Fracture-dislocation with Concomitant Lunotriquetral Ligament Disruption: A Case Report.

J Nippon Med Sch 2018 ;85(4):231-235

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nippon Medical School Hospital.

We report a case of trans-scaphoid perilunate fracture-dislocation with concomitant lunotriquetral ligament disruption of the right wrist in a 44-year-old man, sustained from a 10-m fall landing on his outstretched right hand. Open reduction was performed 1 day after injury; at first the palmar dislocation of the lunate was reduced with the palmar approach. Under direct view with the dorsal approach, the scaphoid was comminuted and then treated with open reduction and internal fixation with a double threshold screw using a dorsal approach and a bone graft from the distal radius. Although the scapholunate ligament was intact, the lunotriquetral ligament was disrupted and required repair with metal suture anchors. At the 28-month follow-up evaluation, the patient had no residual pain in his wrist and returned to work. Trans-scaphoid perilunate fracture-dislocations often accompany a comminuted fracture of the scaphoid and disruptions of the intercarpal ligaments, and bone union and ligament healing time is delayed. Prolonged immobilization of the wrist may restrict its range of motion and limit daily activities. Therefore, open reduction and internal fixation with a bone graft for the scaphoid and simultaneous repair of interosseous intercarpal ligaments are essential for satisfactory recovery from perilunate fracture-dislocations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1272/jnms.JNMS.2018_85-36DOI Listing
November 2018

Arthroscopic Coracoclavicular Ligament Reconstruction for Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocation.

J Nippon Med Sch 2018 ;85(3):166-171

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nippon Medical School.

Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate mid- and long-term clinical and radiologic outcomes of arthroscopic coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction (ACCLR) with an artificial ligament for acute dislocation of the acromioclavicular joint (ACJ).

Methods: Twelve male patients (average age at the time of surgery: 40.8 years, range: 21-64 years) underwent ACCLR with an artificial ligament for acute dislocation of the ACJ type III or type V according to the Rockwood classification. Arthroscopic surgery was performed with the patient under general anesthesia and interscalene brachial plexus block in the beach-chair position. Reduction of the ACJ was performed manually or using an elevator under control of an imaging intensifier. The ACJ was fixed temporarily with a Kirschner wire. Bone tunnels of the coracoid process and clavicle were made with a cannulated drill. An artificial ligament was pulled out through the bone tunnels and fixed on the upper surface of the clavicle with a staple and interference screw, and on the undersurface of the coracoid process with an Endobutton. The shoulder was immobilized with a shoulder brace for 4 weeks postoperatively, and rehabilitation was started in the first postoperative week. The Japan Shoulder Society Acromioclavicular Joint Function Assessment (JSS-ACJ) score was used for evaluation of clinical outcomes, and plain radiographs were performed after a minimum follow-up period of 5 years postoperatively.

Results: The average follow-up period after surgery was 106.3 months (range: 62-128 months). The average postoperative JSS-ACJ score was 97.2 points (range: 92-100). The seven patients who had been playing sports before injury all returned to their pre-injury level. No patients complained of pain or shoulder dysfunction in daily activities, work, or sports. There were no complications such as neurovascular injuries during surgery, infection, or foreign body reaction from the artificial ligament. Radiographs at the final follow-up showed subluxation of the ACJ and non-symptomatic osteoarthritic changes of the ACJ in two patients, respectively.

Conclusion: ACCLR for acute dislocation of the ACJ is a useful surgical procedure that gives satisfactory clinical and radiologic outcomes on mid- and long-term follow-up. ACCLR can stabilize vertical instability of the ACJ. If instability in the horizontal direction remains, repair or reconstruction of the acromioclavicular ligament should be added to prevent osteoarthritic changes of the ACJ.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1272/jnms.JNMS.2018_85-24DOI Listing
October 2018

Clinical outcomes and structural integrity of arthroscopic double-row versus suture-bridge repair for rotator cuff tears.

J Orthop 2018 Jun 17;15(2):396-400. Epub 2018 Mar 17.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nippon Medical School Hospital, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8602, Japan.

The purpose of this study was to compare clinical outcomes and retear rate between arthroscopic double row (DR) and suture bridge (SB) repair for rotator cuff tears. Postoperative Constant score and MRI findings were compared between 52 patients underwent DR repair and 63 patients underwent SB repair with medium tear of the supraspinatus. There was no significant difference in Constant score between the two groups. Postoperative MRI revealed that retear rate of SB group was significantly lower than DR group. This study suggests that SB repair can provide better clinical and structural outcomes compared with DR repair.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jor.2018.03.012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5990216PMC
June 2018