Publications by authors named "Kent A Sabey"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Shear Bond Comparison between 4 Bioceramic Materials and Dual-cure Composite Resin.

J Endod 2019 Nov 3;45(11):1378-1383. Epub 2019 Sep 3.

Department of Endodontics, Louisiana State University, School of Dentistry, New Orleans, Louisiana.

Introduction: Bioceramic materials have shown biologic and physical properties favorable for regenerative treatment. A key to treatment success is an adequate restoration to prevent microleakage; however, research is limited regarding the bond strength between restorative and bioceramic materials used in regenerative procedures. This study compared the bond strength between 4 bioceramic materials and a dual-cure composite resin.

Methods: Eighty wells in Teflon (ePlastics, San Diego, CA) blocks were filled with bioceramic materials representing 4 groups: White ProRoot mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) (Dentsply Tulsa Dental, Tulsa, OK), Biodentine (Septodont, Saint Maur des Fosses, France), EndoSequence Root Repair Material Fast Set Putty (Brasseler USA, Savannah, GA), and NeoMTA (Avalon Biomed Inc, Houston, TX). After allowing samples to set according to the manufacturers' instructions, exposed surfaces of the bioceramic materials were prepared using ClearFil SE Bond (Kuraray America, Inc., New York, NY) followed by restoration with ClearFil DC Core Plus (Kuraray America, Inc.). To test shear bond strength, each block was secured in a universal testing machine, and the crosshead was advanced at 0.5 mm/min until fracture. Newton peak force was recorded and megapascals calculated followed by data comparison.

Results: The mean shear bond strengths between ClearFil DC Core Plus and the bioceramic materials were as follows: White ProRoot MTA, 7.96 MPa; Biodentine, 9.18 MPa; EndoSequence Root Repair Material Fast Set Putty, 4.47 MPa; and NeoMTA, 5.72 MPa. White ProRoot MTA and Biodentine were statistically similar, with a higher stress bond strength than NeoMTA, which had a statistically greater bond strength than EndoSequence Root Repair Material. All these values were lower than typical bond strengths shown for dentin-composite resin bonding.

Conclusions: The choice of which bioceramic material to use in regenerative procedures should be based on factors other than the bond between that material and the overlying coronal resin restoration.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joen.2019.07.008DOI Listing
November 2019

Accuracy of Cone-beam Computed Tomographic Image Interpretation by Endodontists and Endodontic Residents.

J Endod 2018 Apr 1;44(4):571-575. Epub 2018 Feb 1.

Department of Endodontics, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, School of Dentistry, New Orleans, Louisiana.

Introduction: Limited field cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging has become a modality frequently used by endodontists to evaluate the teeth and surrounding tissues of their patients. Accurate image interpretation is vital to obtain needed treatment information as well as to discern coincidental findings that could be present. The goal of this study was to determine the accuracy of CBCT volume interpretation when performed by endodontists and endodontic residents.

Methods: Eighteen deidentified limited field CBCT scans were obtained and evaluated by an oral and maxillofacial radiologist and an endodontist experienced in reading CBCT images. Their collective findings were combined as the "gold standard" of interpretation for this investigation. Using standard CBCT software, 4 practicing endodontists and 5 second-year endodontic residents evaluated each scan and recorded any notable findings and whether or not each scan warranted referral to a radiology specialist. Their interpretations were then compared with the gold standard to determine accuracy and any significant differences among the groups.

Results: The overall accuracy was 58.3% for endodontists and 64.3% for residents. Paired t tests showed no statistically significant differences in accuracy between the 2 groups for findings in teeth or in bone, but residents were significantly better for maxillary sinus findings. Endodontists agreed with the gold standard 38.9% of the time and residents 49.8% of the time on necessity of referral. The Cohen kappa coefficient showed moderate agreement between the groups.

Conclusions: Endodontists and residents had similar accuracy in CBCT scan evaluation. More training and experience are warranted for both groups in order to maximize image assessment accuracy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joen.2017.12.012DOI Listing
April 2018

The Effects of Irrigants on the Survival of Human Stem Cells of the Apical Papilla, Including Endocyn.

J Endod 2018 Feb 8;44(2):263-268. Epub 2017 Dec 8.

Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, Louisiana State University, School of Dentistry, New Orleans, Louisiana. Electronic address:

Introduction: Endocyn, a pH-neutral solution of hypochlorous acid and hypochlorite has been developed for use as an endodontic irrigant. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of Endocyn on human periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts, rat osteosarcoma cells (UMR-106), and stem cells of the apical papilla (SCAP) compared with other commonly used endodontic irrigants.

Methods: To determine cytotoxicity, cells were exposed to various concentrations of Endocyn, 6% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), 17% EDTA, and 2% chlorhexidine for 10 minutes, 1 hour, or 24 hours. Cell survival was measured fluorescently using calcein AM. Endocyn also was tested for its ability to inhibit SCAP proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity. Finally, SCAP transcript expression was examined via reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction.

Results: Endocyn was no more toxic to PDL and UMR cells than water for up to 24 hours. Endocyn concentrations of 50% were toxic to SCAP after 1 hour of exposure. Endocyn concentrations of >20% inhibited SCAP proliferation, whereas concentrations of ≥10% inhibited alkaline phosphatase activity. Exposure of SCAP to 10% Endocyn for 3 days did not alter most transcript expression, but did significantly reduce the expression of alkaline phosphatase, fibromodulin, and osteomodulin.

Conclusion: Endocyn was significantly less cytotoxic to PDL, UMR-106, and SCAP cells compared with other commonly used endodontic irrigants. High concentrations of Endocyn did inhibit some transcript expression and alkaline phosphatase activity, indicating a potential reduction in the osteogenic potential of stems cells exposed to Endocyn.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joen.2017.09.001DOI Listing
February 2018

A Comparison of Coronal Tooth Discoloration Elicited by Various Endodontic Reparative Materials.

J Endod 2016 Mar 24;42(3):470-3. Epub 2015 Nov 24.

Louisiana State University, New Orleans, Louisiana.

Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate coronal tooth discoloration of ProRoot MTA (Dentsply Tulsa Dental, Johnson City, TN), white ProRoot MTA, EndoSequence Root Repair Material (Brasseler USA, Savannah, GA), MTA Angelus (Angelus Solucoes Odontologicas, Londrina, Brazil), and Biodentine (Septodont, Saint Maur des Fosses, France) when used in an ex vivo pulpotomy model.

Methods: Freshly extracted mandibular third molars were collected and stored in 1% chloramine-T solution. Teeth were randomly assigned into 6 groups (n = 15) and stored individually in phosphate buffered saline at 37 °C in 100% humidity. A standardized endodontic access was made in 5 groups. A 3-mm-thick increment of reparative material was placed on the pulpal floor, covered by glass ionomer, and the access opening restored with composite. Color (Commission Internationale de l'eclairage L*a*b*) was recorded with the Vita Easy Shade spectrophotometer (VITA Zahnfabrik, Bad Säckingen, Germany) on the midbuccal surface at baseline; after access preparation; after material placement; and then after 1, 7, 30, and 60 days. Changes in Commission Internationale de l'eclairage L*a*b* were measured for each experimental group and compared with ProRoot MTA (positive control) and no treatment (negative control) using the following equation: ΔE = ([Li - L0*]2 + [ai - a0*]2 + [bi - b0*]2)(1/2). The mean results were analyzed within each group and between groups using the Friedman 2-way analysis post hoc test (P < .05).

Results: There were no significant differences between white ProRoot MTA, MTA Angelus, and the positive control group. EndoSequence Root Repair Material and Biodentine produced significantly less discoloration than white ProRoot MTA, MTA Angelus, and ProRoot MTA.

Conclusions: Under the conditions of this study, EndoSequence and Biodentine had significantly less discoloration compared with white ProRoot MTA, MTA Angelus, and ProRoot MTA. The potential for discoloration may or may not correlate when materials are used clinically.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joen.2015.10.013DOI Listing
March 2016

Evaluation of 4 Different Irrigating Systems for Apical Extrusion of Sodium Hypochlorite.

J Endod 2015 Sep 2;41(9):1530-4. Epub 2015 Jul 2.

Louisiana State University, New Orleans, Louisiana.

Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate NaOCl apical extrusion by using negative apical pressure (EndoVac), sonic agitation (EndoActivator), side-vented needle (Max-i-Probe), and photon induced photoacoustic streaming (PIPS 10 mJ and PIPS 20 mJ) laser irrigation in an in vitro gel model.

Methods: Extracted mandibular and maxillary central incisors (n = 18) were prepared to size 35/.04 and 55/.04, respectively. Teeth were mounted in transparent containers with clear acrylic and suspended in a color-changing pH-sensitive gel, creating a closed system. By using a crossover design, each tooth was sequentially irrigated by using 6% NaOCl with each device following manufacturers' recommendations. Each tooth served as its own control. Pre-irrigation and post-irrigation buccal and proximal view photographs served to measure the longest distance of extrusion and were analyzed with ImageJ software. Mean results were analyzed by using Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn post hoc test (P < .05).

Results: There were no significant differences between EndoVac, EndoActivator, and the passive extrusion groups. The EndoVac and EndoActivator groups produced significantly less extrusion than PIPS irrigation. Max-i-Probe extrusion results were more variable than those of EndoActivator but had no significant difference. Across all irrigation systems, there were no significant differences with respect to apical preparation size.

Conclusions: Under the in vitro conditions of this study, no difference was found between the 10 mJ and 20 mJ PIPS laser groups. EndoVac demonstrated significantly less potential for apical extrusion than PIPS and Max-i-Probe, whereas apical preparation size did not significantly affect extrusion of irrigant. The potential for apical extrusion of endodontic irrigants should be a consideration when selecting a system for final irrigation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joen.2015.05.007DOI Listing
September 2015

Effect of repeated simulated clinical use and sterilization on the cutting efficiency and flexibility of Hyflex CM nickel-titanium rotary files.

J Endod 2015 May 3;41(5):725-8. Epub 2015 Mar 3.

Department of Endodontics, Louisiana State University, New Orleans, Louisiana.

Introduction: Recent nickel-titanium manufacturing processes have resulted in an alloy that remains in a twinned martensitic phase at operating temperature. This alloy has been shown to have increased flexibility with added tolerance to cyclic and torsional fatigue. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of repeated simulated clinical use and sterilization on cutting efficiency and flexibility of Hyflex CM rotary files.

Methods: Cutting efficiency was determined by measuring the load required to maintain a constant feed rate while instrumenting simulated canals. Flexibility was determined by using a 3-point bending test. Files were autoclaved after each use according to the manufacturer's recommendations. Files were tested through 10 simulated clinical uses. For cutting efficiency, mean data were analyzed by using multiple factor analysis of variance and the Dunnett post hoc test (P < .05). For flexibility, mean data were analyzed by using Levene's Test of Equality of Error and a general linear model (P < .05).

Results: No statistically significant decrease in cutting efficiency was noted in groups 2, 5, 6, and 7. A statistically significant decrease in cutting efficiency was noted in groups 3, 4, 8, 9, and 10. No statistically significant decrease in flexibility was noted in groups 2, 3, and 7. A statistically significant decrease in flexibility was noted in groups 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, and 11.

Conclusions: Repeated simulated clinical use and sterilization showed no effect on cutting efficiency through 1 use and no effect on flexibility through 2 uses.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joen.2015.01.011DOI Listing
May 2015

Bond strength of silorane- and methacrylate-based composites to resin-modified glass ionomers.

Gen Dent 2013 Nov-Dec;61(7):73-8

This study evaluated the shear-bond strength of a resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI) restorative material to a new silorane-based composite and a methacrylate-based composite in a sandwich technique with various combinations of surface treatments and bonding agents. Two composites, 2 bonding agents and 4 surface preparations were used to create 16 groups with 10 specimens each. After 24 hours storage at 37°C in 100% humidity, the specimens were tested for shear bond strength; means and standard deviations were determined per group. Surface modifications did not affect the shear-bond strength of the silorane or methacrylate composites to the RMGI. The new silorane composite had significantly lower bond strength to the RMGI compared to the methacrylate composite. The new silorane system adhesive agent had significantly higher bond strength to the RMGI compared to the methacrylate adhesive agent. The greatest bond strengths to the RMGI were produced when using the silorane system adhesive agent with the methacrylate composite.
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September 2015

Effect of repeated refrigerant spray applications using various carriers on pulpal temperature change.

Gen Dent 2010 May-Jun;58(3):e122-5

Kirtland AFB, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA.

This study sought to determine how repeated applications of a refrigerant spray on various cotton carriers affected the change in pulpal temperature. A thermocouple was placed at the roof of the pulp chamber of a human maxillary canine and connected to a thermometer logging at one-second intervals while the root was immersed in a water bath at 37 degrees C. Four different carrier types were used: large cotton pellets, small cotton pellets, cotton-tip applicators, and cotton rolls. Each carrier was sprayed with 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane and placed on the crown for five seconds. Pulpal temperature change was recorded after each five second application of the same carrier to the tooth until a total of six consecutive sprays and applications of the carrier were applied. Each carrier group consisted of 10 performances of the six sets of readings (n = 10). The difference between baseline and the low temperature reading was calculated to determine the temperature change (in degrees C) in the pulp chamber per application. When the refrigerant spray was used, the large cotton pellet carrier generally produced the largest decrease in pulpal temperature at each repeated application compared to the other types of carriers. However, the same large cotton pellet should not be sprayed with the refrigerant more than two times before it is replaced.
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September 2010
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