Publications by authors named "Kenneth Rabin"

13 Publications

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COVID-19 vaccine acceptance among adults in four major US metropolitan areas and nationwide.

Sci Rep 2021 11 4;11(1):21844. Epub 2021 Nov 4.

Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), Hospital Clínic, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.

This study assesses attitudes towards COVID-19 vaccination and the predictive value of COVID-VAC, a novel scale, among adults in the four largest US metropolitan areas and nationally. A 36-item survey of 6037 Americans was conducted in mid-April 2021. The study reports factors for COVID-19 vaccine acceptance among: (1) already vaccinated; (2) unvaccinated but willing to accept a vaccine; and (3) unvaccinated and unwilling to vaccinate. More than 20% were unwilling to vaccinate, expressing concerns about vaccine efficacy and safety and questioning the disease's severity. Poverty, working outside of the home and conservative political views are predictors of unwillingness. Conversely, those who either personally tested positive for COVID-19, or had a family member who did so, were more likely to accept vaccination. Majorities of all respondents supported vaccination mandates for employees and university students. Respondents preferred to receive vaccines in their doctor´s office. Lower income and conservative ideology, but not race, were strongly associated with vaccine unwillingness. The predictive value of COVID-VAC was demonstrated. While vaccination mandates are likely to be accepted, additional effective, targeted interventions to increase vaccine uptake are needed urgently.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-00794-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8569192PMC
November 2021

A cross-sectional study of the association of age, gender, education and economic status with individual perceptions of governmental response to COVID-19.

BMJ Open 2021 03 31;11(3):e047310. Epub 2021 Mar 31.

City University of New York (CUNY) Graduate School of Public Health & Health Policy, New York, New York, USA.

Objective: We assessed the impact of key population variables (age, gender, income and education) on perceptions of governmental effectiveness in communicating about COVID-19, helping meet needs for food and shelter, providing physical and mental healthcare services, and allocating dedicated resources to vulnerable populations.

Design: Cross-sectional study carried out in June 2020.

Participants And Setting: 13 426 individuals from 19 countries.

Results: More than 60% of all respondents felt their government had communicated adequately during the pandemic. National variances ranged from 83.4% in China down to 37.2% in Brazil, but overall, males and those with a higher income were more likely to rate government communications highly. Almost half (48.8%) of the respondents felt their government had ensured adequate access to physical health services (ranging from 89.3% for Singapore to 27.2% for Poland), with higher ratings reported by younger and higher-income respondents. Ratings of mental health support were lower overall (32.9%, ranging from 74.8% in China to around 15% in Brazil and Sweden), but highest among younger respondents. Providing support for basic necessities of food and housing was rated highest overall in China (79%) and lowest in Ecuador (14.6%), with higher ratings reported by younger, higher-income and better-educated respondents across all countries. The same three demographic groups tended to rate their country's support to vulnerable groups more highly than other respondents, with national scores ranging from around 75% (Singapore and China) to 19.5% (Sweden). Subgroup findings are mostly independent of intercountry variations with 15% of variation being due to intercountry differences.

Conclusions: The tendency of younger, better-paid and better-educated respondents to rate their country's response to the pandemic more highly, suggests that government responses must be nuanced and pay greater attention to the needs of less-advantaged citizens as they continue to address this pandemic.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2020-047310DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8015791PMC
March 2021

Building Confidence to CONVINCE.

J Health Commun 2020 Oct;25(10):838-842

CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy, Department of Community Health and Social Sciences.

This paper describes the inception and evolution to date of CONVINCE - COVID-19 New Vaccine Information, Communication and Engagement - a rapidly expanding, voluntary global initiative to promote the use of effective public communications and engagement to build vaccine literacy and expedite immunization programs to protect communities against the COVID-19 Pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10810730.2021.1884149DOI Listing
October 2020

Hesitant or Not? The Association of Age, Gender, and Education with Potential Acceptance of a COVID-19 Vaccine: A Country-level Analysis.

J Health Commun 2020 10;25(10):799-807

Graduate School of Public Health & Health Policy, City University of New York (CUNY), New York, USA.

In December 2020, the first COVID-19 vaccines were approved. Despite more than 85 million reported cases and 1.8 million known deaths, millions worldwide say they may not accept it. This study assesses the associations of age, gender, and level of education with vaccine acceptance, from a random sample of 13,426 participants selected from 19 high-COVID-19 burden countries in June 2020. Based on univariable and multivariable logistic regression, several noteworthy trends emerged: women in France, Germany, Russia, and Sweden were significantly more likely to accept a vaccine than men in these countries. Older (≥50) people in Canada, Poland, France, Germany, Sweden, and the UK were significantly more favorably disposed to vaccination than younger respondents, but the reverse trend held in China. Highly educated individuals in Ecuador, France, Germany, India, and the US reported that they will accept a vaccine, but higher education levels were associated with lower vaccination acceptance in Canada, Spain, and the UK. Heterogeneity by demographic factors in the respondents' willingness to accept a vaccine if recommended by employers were substantial when comparing responses from Brazil, Ecuador, France, India, Italy, Mexico, Poland, Russia, South Africa, South Korea, Sweden, and the US. This information should help public health authorities target vaccine promotion messages more effectively.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10810730.2020.1868630DOI Listing
October 2020

A global survey of potential acceptance of a COVID-19 vaccine.

Nat Med 2021 02 20;27(2):225-228. Epub 2020 Oct 20.

City University of New York (CUNY) Graduate School of Public Health & Health Policy, New York NY, USA.

Several coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccines are currently in human trials. In June 2020, we surveyed 13,426 people in 19 countries to determine potential acceptance rates and factors influencing acceptance of a COVID-19 vaccine. Of these, 71.5% of participants reported that they would be very or somewhat likely to take a COVID-19 vaccine, and 48.1% reported that they would accept their employer's recommendation to do so. Differences in acceptance rates ranged from almost 90% (in China) to less than 55% (in Russia). Respondents reporting higher levels of trust in information from government sources were more likely to accept a vaccine and take their employer's advice to do so.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-020-1124-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7573523PMC
February 2021

COVID-SCORE: A global survey to assess public perceptions of government responses to COVID-19 (COVID-SCORE-10).

PLoS One 2020 6;15(10):e0240011. Epub 2020 Oct 6.

Graduate School of Public Health & Health Policy, City University of New York (CUNY), New York, New York, United States of America.

Background: Understanding public perceptions of government responses to COVID-19 may foster improved public cooperation. Trust in government and population risk of exposure may influence public perception of the response. Other population-level characteristics, such as country socio-economic development, COVID-19 morbidity and mortality, and degree of democratic government, may influence perception.

Methods And Findings: We developed a novel ten-item instrument that asks respondents to rate key aspects of their government's response to the pandemic (COVID-SCORE). We examined whether the results varied by gender, age group, education level, and monthly income. We also examined the internal and external validity of the index using appropriate predefined variables. To test for dimensionality of the results, we used a principal component analysis (PCA) for the ten survey items. We found that Cronbach's alpha was 0.92 and that the first component of the PCA explained 60% of variance with the remaining factors having eigenvalues below 1, strongly indicating that the tool is both reliable and unidimensional. Based on responses from 13,426 people randomly selected from the general population in 19 countries, the mean national scores ranged from 35.76 (Ecuador) to 80.48 (China) out of a maximum of 100 points. Heterogeneity in responses was observed across age, gender, education and income with the greatest amount of heterogeneity observed between countries. National scores correlated with respondents' reported levels of trust in government and with country-level COVID-19 mortality rates.

Conclusions: The COVID-SCORE survey instrument demonstrated satisfactory validity. It may help governments more effectively engage constituents in current and future efforts to control COVID-19. Additional country-specific assessment should be undertaken to measure trends over time and the public perceptions of key aspects of government responses in other countries.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0240011PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7538106PMC
October 2020

COVID-19: A Barometer for Social Justice in New York City.

Am J Public Health 2020 11 10;110(11):1656-1658. Epub 2020 Sep 10.

Ayman El-Mohandes is the Dean of the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy and with the Department of Epidemiology, CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy, New York, NY. Barbara Aaron is with the Department of Communications, CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. Scott C. Ratzan, Lauren Rauh, Victoria Ngo, Kenneth Rabin, and Nicholas Freudenberg are with the Department of Community Health and Social Sciences, CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. Spencer Kimball is with the Department of Communication Studies, Emerson College, Boston, MA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305939DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7542288PMC
November 2020

The public health crisis of underimmunisation: a global plan of action.

Lancet Infect Dis 2020 01 6;20(1):e11-e16. Epub 2019 Nov 6.

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA.

Vaccination is one of public health's greatest achievements, responsible for saving billions of lives. Yet, 20% of children worldwide are not fully protected, leading to 1·5 million child deaths annually from vaccine-preventable diseases. Millions more people have severe disabling illnesses, cancers, and disabilities stemming from underimmunisation. Reasons for falling vaccination rates globally include low public trust in vaccines, constraints on affordability or access, and insufficient governmental vaccine investments. Consequently, an emerging crisis in vaccine hesitancy ranges from hyperlocal to national and worldwide. Outbreaks often originate in small, insular communities with low immunisation rates. Local outbreaks can spread rapidly, however, transcending borders. Following an assessment of underlying determinants of low vaccination rates, we offer an action based on scientific evidence, ethics, and human rights that spans multiple governments, organisations, disciplines, and sectors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(19)30558-4DOI Listing
January 2020

The Salzburg Statement on Vaccination Acceptance.

J Health Commun 2019 2;24(5):581-583. Epub 2019 Jul 2.

Immunization represents one of the greatest public health achievements. Vaccines save lives, make communities more productive and strengthen health systems. They are critical to attaining the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Vaccination also represents value for investment in public health. It is undisputedly one of the most cost-effective ways of avoiding disease, each year preventing 2-3 million deaths globally. We the concerned scientists, public health professionals, physicians, and child health advocates issue this Salzburg Statement along with the International Working Group on Vaccination and Public Health Solutions, proclaiming our unwavering commitment to universal childhood vaccination, and our pledge to support the development, testing, implementation, and evaluation of new, effective, and fact-based communication programs. Our goal is to explain vaccinations to parents or caregivers, answer their questions, address their concerns, and maintain public confidence in the personal, family and community protection that childhood vaccines provide. Every effort will also be made to communicate the dangers associated with these childhood illnesses to parents and communities since this information seems to have been lost in the present-day narrative. While vaccine misinformation has led to serious declines in community vaccination rates that require immediate attention, in other communities, particularly in low-income countries, issues such as lack of access. and unstable supply of vaccines need to be addressed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10810730.2019.1622611DOI Listing
September 2020

The Journal of Health Communication celebrates 100 issues--what's next?

Authors:
Kenneth H Rabin

J Health Commun 2012 ;17(2):123-4

Global Health Public Relations, Warsaw, Poland.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10810730.2012.660823DOI Listing
June 2012
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