Publications by authors named "Kenneth Kochanek"

44 Publications

Deaths: Final Data for 2018.

Natl Vital Stat Rep 2021 Jan;69(13):1-83

Objectives-This report presents final 2018 data on U.S. deaths, death rates, life expectancy, infant and maternal mortality, and trends by selected characteristics such as age, sex, Hispanic origin and race, state of residence, and cause of death. The race categories are consistent with 1997 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) standards, which are different from previous reports (1977 OMB standards). Methods-Information reported on death certificates is presented in descriptive tabulations. The original records are filed in state registration offices. Statistical information is compiled in a national database through the Vital Statistics Cooperative Program of the National Center for Health Statistics. Causes of death are processed according to the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision. As of 2018, all states and the District of Columbia were using the 2003 revised certificate of death, which includes the 1997 OMB revised standards for race. The 2018 data based on the revised standards are not completely comparable to previous years. Selected estimates are presented in this report for both the revised and previous race standards to provide some reference for interpretation of trends. Results-In 2018, a total of 2,839,205 deaths were reported in the United States. The age-adjusted death rate was 723.6 deaths per 100,000 U.S. standard population, a decrease of 1.1% from the 2017 rate. Life expectancy at birth was 78.7 years, an increase of 0.1 year from 2017. Age-specific death rates decreased in 2018 from 2017 for age groups 15-24, 25-34, 45-54, 65-74, 75-84, and 85 and over. The 15 leading causes of death in 2018 remained the same as in 2017. The infant mortality rate decreased 2.2% to a historically low figure of 5.66 infant deaths per 1,000 live births in 2018. Conclusions-The age-adjusted death rate for the total, male, and female populations decreased from 2017 to 2018, and life expectancy at birth increased in 2018 for the total, male, and female populations.
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January 2021

Mortality in the United States, 2019.

NCHS Data Brief 2020 Dec(395):1-8

This report presents final 2019 U.S. mortality data on deaths and death rates by demographic and medical characteristics. These data provide information on mortality patterns among U.S. residents by variables such as sex, age, race and Hispanic origin, and cause of death. Life expectancy estimates, agespecific death rates, 10 leading causes of death, and 10 leading causes of infant death were analyzed by comparing 2019 and 2018 final data (1).
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December 2020

Deaths: Final Data for 2017.

Natl Vital Stat Rep 2019 Jun;68(9):1-77

Objectives-This report presents final 2017 data on U.S. deaths, death rates, life expectancy, infant mortality, and trends, by selected characteristics such as age, sex, Hispanic origin and race, state of residence, and cause of death. Methods-Information reported on death certificates is presented in descriptive tabulations. The original records are filed in state registration offices. Statistical information is compiled in a national database through the Vital Statistics Cooperative Program of the National Center for Health Statistics. Causes of death are processed in accordance with the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision. Results-In 2017, a total of 2,813,503 deaths were reported in the United States. The age-adjusted death rate was 731.9 deaths per 100,000 U.S. standard population, an increase of 0.4% from the 2016 rate. Life expectancy at birth was 78.6 years, a decrease of 0.1 year from the 2016 rate. Life expectancy decreased from 2016 to 2017 for non-Hispanic white males (0.1 year) and non-Hispanic black males (0.1), and increased for non- Hispanic black females (0.1). Age-specific death rates increased in 2017 from 2016 for age groups 25-34, 35-44, and 85 and over, and decreased for age groups under 1 and 45-54. The 15 leading causes of death in 2017 remained the same as in 2016 although, two causes exchanged ranks. Chronic liver disease and cirrhosis, the 12th leading cause of death in 2016, became the 11th leading cause of death in 2017, while Septicemia, the 11th leading cause of death in 2016, became the 12th leading cause of death in 2017. The infant mortality rate, 5.79 infant deaths per 1,000 live births in 2017, did not change significantly from the rate of 5.87 in 2016. Conclusions-The age-adjusted death rate for the total, male, and female populations increased from 2016 to 2017 and life expectancy at birth decreased in 2017 for the total and male populations.
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June 2019

United States Life Tables, 2016.

Natl Vital Stat Rep 2019 May;68(4):1-66

Objectives-This report presents complete period life tables for the United States by race, Hispanic origin, and sex, based on age-specific death rates in 2016. Methods-Data used to prepare the 2016 life tables are 2016 final mortality statistics; July 1, 2016 population estimates based on the 2010 decennial census; and 2016 Medicare data for persons aged 66-99. The methodology used to estimate the life tables for the Hispanic population remains unchanged from that developed for the publication of life tables by Hispanic origin for data year 2006. The methodology used to estimate the 2016 life tables for all other groups was first implemented with data year 2008. Results-In 2016, the overall expectation of life at birth was 78.7 years, unchanged from 2015. Between 2015 and 2016, life expectancy at birth decreased by 0.1 year for males (76.3 to 76.2) and did not change for females (81.1). Life expectancy at birth did not change for the white population (78.9) between 2015 and 2016. Life expectancy at birth decreased by 0.2 year for the black population (75.5 to 75.3) and for the non-Hispanic black population (75.1 to 74.9). Life expectancy at birth decreased by 0.1 year for the non-Hispanic white population (78.7 to 78.6) and for the Hispanic population (81.9 to 81.8).
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May 2019

Mortality in the United States, 2017.

NCHS Data Brief 2018 Nov(328):1-8

This report presents final 2017 U.S. mortality data on deaths and death rates by demographic and medical characteristics. These data provide information on mortality patterns among U.S. residents by variables such as sex, race and ethnicity, and cause of death. Life expectancy estimates, age-specific death rates, age-adjusted death rates by race and ethnicity and sex, 10 leading causes of death, and 10 leading causes of infant death were analyzed by comparing 2017 and 2016 final data (1).
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November 2018

National Center for Health Statistics Data Presentation Standards for Proportions.

Vital Health Stat 2 2017 Aug(175):1-22

The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) disseminates information on a broad range of health topics through diverse publications. These publications must rely on clear and transparent presentation standards that can be broadly and efficiently applied. Standards are particularly important for large, cross-cutting reports where estimates cannot be individually evaluated and indicators of precision cannot be included alongside the estimates. This report describes the NCHS Data Presentation Standards for Proportions. The multistep NCHS Data Presentation Standards for Proportions are based on a minimum denominator sample size and on the absolute and relative widths of a confidence interval calculated using the Clopper-Pearson method. Proportions (usually multiplied by 100 and expressed as percentages) are the most commonly reported estimates in NCHS reports.
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August 2017

Deaths: Final Data for 2016.

Natl Vital Stat Rep 2018 Jul;67(5):1-76

This report presents final 2016 data on U.S. deaths, death rates, life expectancy, infant mortality, and trends, by selected characteristics such as age, sex, Hispanic origin and race, state of residence, and cause of death.
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July 2018

Mortality in the United States, 2016.

NCHS Data Brief 2017 12(293):1-8

This report presents final 2016 U.S. mortality data on deaths and death rates by demographic and medical characteristics. These data provide information on mortality patterns among U.S. residents by variables such as sex, race and ethnicity, and cause of death. Life expectancy estimates, age-specific death rates, age-adjusted death rates by race and ethnicity and sex, 10 leading causes of death, and 10 leading causes of infant death were analyzed by comparing 2016 and 2015 final data (1).
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December 2017

Deaths: Final Data for 2015.

Natl Vital Stat Rep 2017 Nov;66(6):1-75

Objectives-This report presents final 2015 data on U.S. deaths, death rates, life expectancy, infant mortality, and trends, by selected characteristics such as age, sex, Hispanic origin and race, state of residence, and cause of death. Methods-Information reported on death certificates, which are completed by funeral directors, attending physicians, medical examiners, and coroners, is presented in descriptive tabulations. The original records are filed in state registration offices. Statistical information is compiled in a national database through the Vital Statistics Cooperative Program of the National Center for Health Statistics. Causes of death are processed in accordance with the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision. Results-In 2015, a total of 2,712,630 deaths were reported in the United States. The age-adjusted death rate was 733.1 deaths per 100,000 U.S. standard population, an increase of 1.2% from the 2014 rate. Life expectancy at birth was 78.8 years, a decrease of 0.1 year from 2014. Life expectancy decreased from 2014 to 2015 for non-Hispanic white males (0.2 year), non-Hispanic white females (0.1), non-Hispanic black males (0.4), non-Hispanic black females (0.1), Hispanic males (0.1), and Hispanic females (0.2). Age-specific death rates increased in 2015 from 2014 for age groups 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 55-64, 65-74, and 85 and over. The 15 leading causes of death in 2015 remained the same as in 2014. The infant mortality rate, 5.90 infant deaths per 1,000 live births in 2015, did not change significantly from the rate of 5.82 in 2014. Conclusions-The age-adjusted death rate increased for the first time since 2005. Life expectancy for the total population decreased for the first time since 1993.
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November 2017

Contribution of Opioid-Involved Poisoning to the Change in Life Expectancy in the United States, 2000-2015.

JAMA 2017 09;318(11):1065-1067

National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jama.2017.9308DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5818798PMC
September 2017

Mortality in the United States, 2015.

NCHS Data Brief 2016 Dec(267):1-8

Key Findings: Data from the National Vital Statistics System, Mortality •Life expectancy for the U.S. population in 2015 was 78.8 years, a decrease of 0.1 year from 2014. •The age-adjusted death rate increased 1.2% from 724.6 deaths per 100,000 standard population in 2014 to 733.1 in 2015. •The 10 leading causes of death in 2015 remained the same as in 2014. Age-adjusted death rates increased for eight leading causes and decreased for one. •The infant mortality rate of 589.5 infant deaths per 100,000 live births in 2015 was not significantly different from the 2014 rate. •The 10 leading causes of infant death in 2015 remained the same as in 2014, although two causes exchanged ranks. This report presents 2015 U.S. final mortality data on deaths and death rates by demographic and medical characteristics. These data provide information on mortality patterns among U.S. residents by variables such as sex, race and ethnicity, and cause of death. Life expectancy estimates, age-adjusted death rates by race and ethnicity and sex, 10 leading causes of death, and 10 leading causes of infant death were analyzed by comparing 2015 and 2014 final data (1).
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December 2016

Deaths: Final Data for 2014.

Natl Vital Stat Rep 2016 Jun;65(4):1-122

Objectives-This report presents final 2014 data on U.S. deaths, death rates, life expectancy, infant mortality, and trends, by selected characteristics such as age, sex, Hispanic origin, race, state of residence, and cause of death.
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June 2016

The Effect of Changes in Selected Age-specific Causes of Death on Non-Hispanic White Life Expectancy Between 2000 and 2014.

NCHS Data Brief 2016 Jun(250):1-8

Key Findings: Data from the National Vital Statistics System, Mortality •Between 2000 and 2014, life expectancy increased by 3.6, 2.6, and 1.4 years, respectively, for non-Hispanic black, Hispanic, and non-Hispanic white persons. •The 1.4-year increase in life expectancy for non-Hispanic white persons would have been greater if not for increases in death rates due to unintentional injuries, suicide, Alzheimer's disease, chronic liver disease, and hypertension. •Increases in death rates due to unintentional injuries, suicide, and chronic liver disease were large enough to increase all-cause non-Hispanic white death rates for ages 25-34, 35-44, and 45-54. •Increases in death rates due to unintentional poisonings for ages 25-34, 35-44, and 45-54 had the greatest impact on the change in life expectancy for non-Hispanic white persons.
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June 2016

Deaths: Final Data for 2013.

Natl Vital Stat Rep 2016 Feb;64(2):1-119

Objectives: This report presents final 2013 data on U.S. deaths, death rates, life expectancy, infant mortality, and trends, by selected characteristics such as age, sex, Hispanic origin, race, state of residence, and cause of death.

Methods: Information reported on death certificates, which are completed by funeral directors, attending physicians, medical examiners, and coroners, is presented in descriptive tabulations. The original records are filed in state registration offices. Statistical information is compiled in a national database through the Vital Statistics Cooperative Program of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics. Causes of death are processed in accordance with the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision.

Results: In 2013, a total of 2,596,993 deaths were reported in the United States. The age-adjusted death rate was 731.9 deaths per 100,000 U.S. standard population, a record low figure, but the decrease in 2013 from 2012 was not statistically significant. Life expectancy at birth was 78.8 years, the same as in 2012. Age-specific death rates decreased in 2013 from 2012 for age groups 15–24 and 75–84. Age-specific death rates increased only for age group 55–64. The 15 leading causes of death in 2013 remained the same as in 2012, although Accidents (unintentional injuries), the 5th leading cause of death in 2012, became the 4th leading cause in 2013, while Cerebrovascular diseases (stroke), the 4th leading cause in 2012, became the 5th leading cause of death in 2013. The infant mortality rate of 5.96 deaths per 1,000 live births in 2013 was a historically low value, but it was not significantly different from the 2012 rate.

Conclusions: Although statistically unchanged from 2012, the decline in the age-adjusted death rate is consistent with long-term trends in mortality. Life expectancy in 2013 remained the same as in 2012.
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February 2016

Deaths: Final Data for 2012.

Natl Vital Stat Rep 2015 Aug;63(9):1-117

Objectives: This report presents final 2012 data on U.S. deaths, death rates, life expectancy, infant mortality, and trends by selected characteristics such as age, sex, Hispanic origin, race, state of residence, and cause of death.

Methods: Information reported on death certificates, which is completed by funeral directors, attending physicians, medical examiners, and coroners, is presented in descriptive tabulations. The original records are filed in state registration offices. Statistical information is compiled in a national database through the Vital Statistics Cooperative Program of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics. Causes of death are processed in accordance with the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision.

Results: In 2012, a total of 2,543,279 deaths were reported in the United States. The age-adjusted death rate was 732.8 deaths per 100,000 U.S. standard population, a decrease of 1.1% from the 2011 rate and a record low figure. Life expectancy at birth rose 0.1 year, from 78.7 years in 2011 to a record high of 78.8 in 2012. Age-specific death rates decreased in 2012 from 2011 for age groups 5-14, 15-24, 45-54, 65-74, 75-84, and 85 and over. Age-specific death rates increased only for age group 55-64. The leading causes of death in 2012 remained the same as in 2011. The infant mortality rate of 5.98 deaths per 1,000 live births in 2012 was a historically low value, but it was not significantly different from the 2011 rate.

Conclusions: The decline of the age-adjusted death rate to a record low value for the United States, and the increase in life expectancy to a record high value of 78.8 years, are consistent with long-term trends in mortality.
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August 2015

Mortality in the United States, 2014.

NCHS Data Brief 2015 Dec(229):1-8

This report presents 2014 U.S. final mortality data on deaths and death rates by demographic and medical characteristics. These data provide information on mortality patterns among U.S. residents by such variables as sex, race and ethnicity, and cause of death. Information on mortality patterns is key to understanding changes in the health and well-being of the U.S. population. Life expectancy estimates, age-adjusted death rates by race and ethnicity and sex, the 10 leading causes of death, and the 10 leading causes of infant death were analyzed by comparing 2014 final data with 2013 final data.
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December 2015

How Does Cause of Death Contribute to the Hispanic Mortality Advantage in the United States?

NCHS Data Brief 2015 Nov(221):1-8

Key Findings: The Hispanic population in the United States has lower overall mortality and higher life expectancy at birth than the non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black populations. The expectation has been that the Hispanic population should exhibit a mortality profile that is similar to that of the non-Hispanic black population, not one that is advantaged relative to the non-Hispanic white population (1-4). In this report, differences in the leading causes of death between the Hispanic and non-Hispanic white and black populations are explored to determine how they contributed to the life expectancy advantage of the Hispanic population in 2013.
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November 2015

Leading Causes of Death Contributing to Decrease in Life Expectancy Gap Between Black and White Populations: United States, 1999-2013.

NCHS Data Brief 2015 Nov(218):1-8

Life expectancy at birth has increased steadily since 1900 to a record 78.8 years in 2013. But differences in life expectancy between the white and black populations still exist, despite a decrease in the life expectancy gap from 5.9 years in 1999 to 3.6 years in 2013. Differences in the change over time in the leading causes of death for the black and white populations have contributed to this decrease in the gap in life expectancy. Between 1999 and 2013, the decrease in the life expectancy gap between the black and white populations was mostly due to greater decreases in mortality from heart disease, cancer, HIV disease, unintentional injuries, and perinatal conditions among the black population. Similarly, the decrease in the gap between black and white male life expectancy was due to greater decreases in death rates for HIV disease, cancer, unintentional injuries, heart disease, and perinatal conditions in black males. For black females, greater decreases in diabetes death rates, combined with decreased rates for heart disease and HIV disease, were the major causes contributing to the decrease in the life expectancy gap with white females. The decrease in the gap in life expectancy between the white and black populations would have been larger than 3.6 years if not for increases in death rates for the black population for aortic aneurysm, Alzheimer’s disease, and maternal conditions. For black males, the causes that showed increases in death rates over white males were hypertension, aortic aneurysm, diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease, and kidney disease, while the causes that showed increases in death rates for black females were Alzheimer’s disease, maternal conditions, and atherosclerosis. This NCHS Data Brief is the second in a series of data briefs that explore the causes of death contributing to differences in life expectancy between detailed ethnic and racial populations in the United States. The first data brief focused on the racial differences in life expectancy for a single year, 2010 (3).
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November 2015

Deaths: Final Data for 2011.

Natl Vital Stat Rep 2015 Jul;63(3):1-120

Objectives: This report presents final 2011 data on U.S. deaths, death rates, life expectancy, infant mortality, and trends by selected characteristics such as age, sex, Hispanic origin, race, state of residence, and cause of death.

Methods: Information reported on death certificates, which is completed by funeral directors, attending physicians, medical examiners, and coroners, is presented in descriptive tabulations. The original records are filed in state registration offices. Statistical information is compiled in a national database through the Vital Statistics Cooperative Program of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics. Causes of death are processed in accordance with the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision.

Results: In 2011, a total of 2,515,458 deaths were reported in the United States. The age-adjusted death rate was 741.3 deaths per 100,000 standard population, a decrease of 0.8% from the 2010 rate and a record low figure. Life expectancy at birth in 2011 was unchanged from 2010 at 78.7 years. Age-specific death rates decreased in 2011 from 2010 for age groups under 1 year, 65–74, 75–84, and 85 and over. Age-specific death rates increased for age groups 25–34 and 45–54. The leading causes of death in 2011 remained the same as in 2010, although two causes exchanged ranks. Kidney disease, the eighth leading cause in 2010, became the ninth leading cause in 2011, while Influenza and pneumonia, the ninth leading cause in 2010, became the eighth leading cause of death in 2011. The infant mortality rate of 6.07 deaths per 1,000 live births in 2011 was a historically low value.

Conclusion: The decline of the age-adjusted death rate to a record low value for the United States is consistent with long-term trends in mortality.
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July 2015

Annual summary of vital statistics: 2012-2013.

Pediatrics 2015 Jun 4;135(6):1115-25. Epub 2015 May 4.

Department of Family and Reproductive Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland.

The number of births in the United States declined by 1% between 2012 and 2013, to a total of 3 932 181. The general fertility rate also declined 1% to 62.5 births per 1000 women, the lowest rate ever reported. The total fertility rate was down by 1% in 2013 (to 1857.5 births per 1000 women). The teenage birth rate fell to another historic low in 2013, 26.5 births per 1000 women. Birth rates also declined for women 20 to 29 years, but the rates rose for women 30 to 39 and were unchanged for women 40 to 44. The percentage of all births that were to unmarried women declined slightly to 40.6% in 2013, from 40.7% in 2012. In 2013, the cesarean delivery rate declined to 32.7% from 32.8% for 2012. The preterm birth rate declined for the seventh straight year in 2013 to 11.39%; the low birth weight (LBW) rate was essentially unchanged at 8.02%. The infant mortality rate was 5.96 infant deaths per 1000 live births in 2013, down 13% from 2005 (6.86). The age-adjusted death rate for 2013 was 7.3 deaths per 1000 population, unchanged from 2012. Crude death rates for children aged 1 to 19 years declined to 24.0 per 100 000 population in 2013, from 24.8 in 2012. Unintentional injuries and suicide were, respectively, the first and second leading causes of death in this age group. These 2 causes of death jointly accounted for 45.7% of all deaths to children and adolescents in 2013.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/peds.2015-0434DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4750477PMC
June 2015

Mortality in the United States, 2013.

NCHS Data Brief 2014 Dec(178):1-8

This report presents 2013 U.S. final mortality data on deaths and death rates by demographic and medical characteristics. These data provide information on mortality patterns among U.S. residents by such variables as sex, race and ethnicity, and cause of death. Information on mortality patterns is key to understanding changes in the health and well-being of the U.S. population (1). Life expectancy estimates, age-adjusted death rates by race and ethnicity and sex, 10 leading causes of death, and 10 leading causes of infant death were analyzed by comparing 2013 final data with 2012 final data. In 2013, a total of 2,596,993 resident deaths were registered in the United States.
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December 2014

Mortality in the United States, 2012.

NCHS Data Brief 2014 Oct(168):1-8

Key Findings: Data from the National Vital Statistics System, Mortality. Life expectancy at birth for the U.S. population reached a record high of 78.8 years in 2012. The age-adjusted death rate for the United States decreased 1.1% from 2011 to 2012 to a record low of 732.8 per 100,000 standard population. The 10 leading causes of death in 2012 remained the same as in 2011. Age-adjusted death rates decreased significantly from 2011 to 2012 for 8 of the 10 leading causes and increased significantly for one leading cause (suicide). The infant mortality rate decreased 1.5% from 2011 to 2012 to a historic low of 597.8 infant deaths per 100,000 live births. The 10 leading causes of infant death in 2012 remained the same as in 2011. This report presents 2012 U.S. final mortality data on deaths and death rates by demographic and medical characteristics. These data provide information on mortality patterns among residents of the United States by such variables as sex, race and ethnicity, and cause of death. Information on mortality patterns is key to understanding changes in the health and well-being of the U.S. population (1). Life expectancy estimates, age-adjusted death rates by race and ethnicity and sex, 10 leading causes of death, and 10 leading causes of infant death were analyzed by comparing 2012 final data with 2011 final data.
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October 2014

How did cause of death contribute to racial differences in life expectancy in the United States in 2010?

NCHS Data Brief 2013 Jul(125):1-8

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Health Statistics 3311 Toledo Road, Hyattsville, Maryland 20782, USA.

Key Findings: Data from the National Vital Statistics System, Mortality In 2010, life expectancy for the black population was 3.8 years lower than that of the white population. This difference was due to higher death rates for the black population for heart disease, cancer, homicide, diabetes, and perinatal conditions. Life expectancy for black males was 4.7 years lower than that of white males. This difference was due to higher death rates for black males for heart disease, homicide, cancer, stroke, and perinatal conditions. Life expectancy for black females was 3.3 years lower than that of white females. This difference was due to higher death rates for black females for heart disease, cancer, diabetes, perinatal conditions, and stroke.
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July 2013

Deaths: final data for 2010.

Natl Vital Stat Rep 2013 May;61(4):1-117

Objective: This report presents final 2010 data on U.S. deaths, death rates, life expectancy, infant mortality, and trends by selected characteristics such as age, sex, Hispanic origin, race, state of residence, and cause of death.

Methods: Information reported on death certificates, which is completed by funeral directors, attending physicians, medical examiners, and coroners, is presented in descriptive tabulations. The original records are filed in state registration offices. Statistical information is compiled in a national database through the Vital Statistics Cooperative Program of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics. Causes of death are processed in accordance with the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision.

Results: In 2010, a total of 2,468,435 deaths were reported in the United States. The age-adjusted death rate was 747.0 deaths per 100,000 standard population, lower than the 2009 rate (749.6) and a record low rate. Life expectancy at birth rose 0.2 year, from 78.5 years in 2009 to a record high of 78.7 in 2010. Age-specific death rates decreased for each age group under 85, although the decrease for ages 1-4 was not significant. The age-specific rate increased for ages 85 and over. The leading causes of death in 2010 remained the same as in 2009 for all but one of the 15 leading causes. Pneumonitis due to solids and liquids replaced Assault (homicide) as the 15th leading cause of death in 2010. The infant mortality rate decreased 3.8% to a historically low value of 6.15 deaths per 1,000 live births in 2010.

Conclusions: The decline of the age-adjusted death rate to a record low value for the United States, and the increase in life expectancy to a record high value of 78.7 years, are consistent with long-term trends in mortality.
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May 2013

Deaths: final data for 2008.

Natl Vital Stat Rep 2011 Dec;59(10):1-126

U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, Division of Vital Statistics, Hyattsville, Maryland 20782, USA.

Objectives: This report presents final 2008 data on U.S. deaths, death rates, life expectancy, infant mortality, and trends by selected characteristics such as age, sex, Hispanic origin, race, state of residence, and cause of death.

Methods: Information reported on death certificates, which is completed by funeral directors, attending physicians, medical examiners, and coroners, is presented in descriptive tabulations. The original records are filed in state registration offices. Statistical information is compiled in a national database through the Vital Statistics Cooperative Program of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics. Causes of death are processed in accordance with the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision.

Results: In 2008, a total of 2,471,984 deaths were reported in the United States. The age-adjusted death rate was 758.3 deaths per 100,000 standard population, a decrease of 0.2 percent from the 2007 rate and a record low figure. Life expectancy at birth rose 0.2 years, from 77.9 years in 2007 to a record high 78.1 years in 2008. The age-specific death rate increased for age group 85 years and over. Age-specific death rates decreased for age groups: less than 1 year, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, and 65-74 years. The age-specific death rates remained unchanged for age groups: 1-4, 45-54, 55-64, and 75-84 years. The 15 leading causes of death in 2008 remained the same as in 2007, but Chronic lower respiratory diseases and suicide increased in the ranking while stroke and septicemia decreased in the ranking. Stroke is the fourth leading cause of death in 2008 after more than five decades at number three in the ranking. Chronic lower respiratory diseases is the third leading cause of death for 2008. The infant mortality rate decreased 2.1 percent to a historically low value of 6.61 deaths per 1000 live births in 2008.

Conclusions: The decline of the age-adjusted death rate to a record low value for the United States and the increase in life expectancy to a record high value of 78.1 years are consistent with long-term trends in mortality.
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December 2011

Annual summary of vital statistics: 2009.

Pediatrics 2012 Feb 30;129(2):338-48. Epub 2012 Jan 30.

Division of Vital Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, Hyattsville, MD 20782, USA.

The number of births in the United States decreased by 3% between 2008 and 2009 to 4 130 665 births. The general fertility rate also declined 3% to 66.7 per 1000 women. The teenage birth rate fell 6% to 39.1 per 1000. Birth rates also declined for women 20 to 39 years and for all 5-year groups, but the rate for women 40 to 44 years continued to rise. The percentage of all births to unmarried women increased to 41.0% in 2009, up from 40.6% in 2008. In 2009, 32.9% of all births occurred by cesarean delivery, continuing its rise. The 2009 preterm birth rate declined for the third year in a row to 12.18%. The low-birth-weight rate was unchanged in 2009 at 8.16%. Both twin and triplet and higher order birth rates increased. The infant mortality rate was 6.42 infant deaths per 1000 live births in 2009. The rate is significantly lower than the rate of 6.61 in 2008. Linked birth and infant death data from 2007 showed that non-Hispanic black infants continued to have much higher mortality rates than non-Hispanic white and Hispanic infants. Life expectancy at birth was 78.2 years in 2009. Crude death rates for children and adolescents aged 1 to 19 years decreased by 6.5% between 2008 and 2009. Unintentional injuries and homicide, the first and second leading causes of death jointly accounted for 48.6% of all deaths to children and adolescents in 2009.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/peds.2011-3435DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4079290PMC
February 2012

Deaths: final data for 2009.

Natl Vital Stat Rep 2011 Dec;60(3):1-116

Objective: This report presents final 2009 data on U.S. deaths, death rates, life expectancy, infant mortality, and trends by selected characteristics such as age, sex, Hispanic origin, race, state of residence, and cause of death.

Methods: Information reported on death certificates, which is completed by funeral directors, attending physicians, medical examiners, and coroners, is presented in descriptive tabulations. The original records are filed in state registration offices. Statistical information is compiled in a national database through the Vital Statistics Cooperative Program of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics. Causes of death are processed in accordance with the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision.

Results: In 2009, a total of 2,437,163 deaths were reported in the United States. The age-adjusted death rate was 741.1 deaths per 100,000 standard population, a decrease of 2.3% from the 2008 rate and a record low figure. Life expectancy at birth rose 0.4 years, from 78.1 years in 2008 to a record-high 78.5 years in 2009. Age-specific death rates decreased for age groups: under 1 year, 1-4, 15-24, 55-64, 65-74, and 75-84. The age-specific death rates remained unchanged for age groups 5-14, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, and 85 years and over. The 15 leading causes of death in 2009 remained the same as in 2008. The infant mortality rate decreased 3.3% to a historically low value of 6.39 deaths per 1,000 live births in 2009.

Conclusion: The decline of the age-adjusted death rate to a record low value for the United States and the increase in life expectancy to a record high value of 78.5 years are consistent with long-term trends in mortality.
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December 2011

Deaths: preliminary data for 2009.

Natl Vital Stat Rep 2011 Mar;59(4):1-51

Objectives-This report presents preliminary U.S. data on deaths, death rates, life expectancy, leading causes of death, and infant mortality for 2009 by selected characteristics such as age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin. Methods-Data in this report are based on death records comprising more than 96 percent of the demographic and medical files for all deaths in the United States in 2009. The records are weighted to independent control counts for 2009. Comparisons are made with 2008 preliminary data. Results-The age-adjusted death rate decreased from 758.7 deaths per 100,000 population in 2008 to 741.0 deaths per 100,000 population in 2009. From 2008 to 2009, age-adjusted death rates decreased significantly for 10 of the 15 leading causes of death: Diseases of heart, Malignant neoplasms, Chronic lower respiratory diseases, Cerebrovascular diseases, Accidents (unintentional injuries), Alzheimer's disease, Diabetes mellitus, Influenza and pneumonia, Septicemia, and Assault (homicide). Life expectancy increased by 0.2 year, from 78.0 in 2008 to 78.2 in 2009.
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March 2011

Deaths: preliminary data for 2008.

Natl Vital Stat Rep 2010 Dec;59(2):1-52

Objectives-This report presents preliminary U.S. data on deaths, death rates, life expectancy, leading causes of death, and infant mortality for 2008 by selected characteristics such as age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin. Methods-Data in this report are based on death records comprising more than 99 percent of the demographic and medical files for all deaths in the United States in 2008. The records are weighted to independent control counts for 2008. For certain causes of death such as unintentional injuries, homicides, suicides, drug-induced deaths, and sudden infant death syndrome, preliminary and final data may differ because of the truncated nature of the preliminary file. Comparisons are made with 2007 final data. Results-The age-adjusted death rate decreased from 760.2 deaths per 100,000 population in 2007 to 758.7 deaths per 100,000 population in 2008. From 2007 to 2008, age-adjusted death rates decreased significantly for 6 of the 15 leading causes of death: Diseases of heart, Malignant neoplasms, Cerebrovascular diseases, Accidents (unintentional injuries), Diabetes mellitus, andAssault (homicide). From 2007 to 2008, age-adjusted death rates increased significantly for 6 of the 15 leading causes of death: Chronic lower respiratory diseases; Alzheimer's disease; Influenza and pneumonia; Nephritis, nephrotic syndrome and nephrosis; Intentional self-harm (suicide); and Essential hypertension and hypertensive renal disease. Life expectancy decreased by 0.1 year from 77.9 years in 2007 to 77.8 in 2008.
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December 2010

Deaths: final data for 2007.

Natl Vital Stat Rep 2010 May;58(19):1-19

Objectives-This report presents final 2007 data on U.S. deaths, death rates, life expectancy, infant and maternal mortality, and trends by selected characteristics such as age, sex, Hispanic origin, race, marital status, educational attainment, injury at work, state of residence, and cause of death. Methods-Information reported on death certificates, which are completed by funeral directors, attending physicians, medical examiners, and coroners, is presented in descriptive tabulations. The original records are filed in state registration offices. Statistical information is compiled in a national database through the Vital Statistics Cooperative Program of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics. Causes of death are processed in accordance with the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision. Results-In 2007, a total of 2,423,712 deaths were reported in the United States. The age-adjusted death rate was 760.2 deaths per 100,000 standard population, a decrease of 2.1 percent from the 2006 rate and a record low historical figure. Life expectancy at birth rose 0.2 year, from a 2006 value of 77.7 years to a record 77.9 in 2007. Age-specific death rates decreased for most age groups-15-24, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, and 85 and over-and remained unchanged for the age groups of under age 1, 1-4, 5-14, and 25-34. The 15 leading causes of death in 2007 remained the same as in 2006 with the exception of two causes that exchanged ranks. Alzheimer's disease, the seventh leading cause of death in 2006, became the sixth leading cause in 2007, and Diabetes mellitus, the sixth leading cause in 2006, dropped to the seventh leading cause in 2007. Heart disease and cancer continued to be the leading and second-leading causes of death, respectively, together accounting for almost one-half of all deaths (48.6 percent). The infant mortality rate in 2007 was 6.75 deaths per 1,000 live births. Conclusions-Mortality patterns in 2007, such as the decline in the age-adjusted death rate to a record historical low, were generally consistent with long-term trends. Life expectancy reached a record high in 2007, increasing 0.2 year from 2006.
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May 2010