Publications by authors named "Kenji Tominaga"

22 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A glypican-1-targeted antibody-drug conjugate exhibits potent tumor growth inhibition in glypican-1-positive pancreatic cancer and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

Neoplasia 2021 Sep 28;23(9):939-950. Epub 2021 Jul 28.

Department of Clinical Immunology, Kochi Medical School, Kochi University, Nankoku, Kochi, Japan; Institute for Biomedical Sciences Molecular Pathophysiology, Iwate Medical University, Yahaba, Iwate, Japan; Division of Allergy and Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Iwate Medical University School of Medicine, Yahaba, Iwate, Japan. Electronic address:

An antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) is a promising therapeutic modality because selective and effective delivery of an anti-cancer drug is achieved by drug-conjugated antibody-targeting cancer antigen. Glypican 1 (GPC1) is highly expressed in malignant tumors, including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Herein, we describe the usefulness of GPC1-targeting ADC. Humanized anti-GPC1 antibody (clone T2) was developed and conjugated with monomethyl auristatin E (MMAE) via maleimidocaproyl-valine-citrulline-p-aminobenzyloxycarbonyl (mc-vc-PABC) linkers (humanized GPC1-ADC[MMAE]). Humanized GPC1-ADC(MMAE) inhibited the growth of GPC1-positive PDAC and ESCC cell lines via inducing cycle arrest in the G2/M phase and apoptosis in vitro. The binding activity of humanized GPC1-ADC(MMAE) with GPC1 was comparable with that of the unconjugated anti-GPC1 antibody. The humanized GPC1-ADC(MMAE) was effective in GPC1-positive BxPC-3 subcutaneously xenografted mice but not in GPC1-negative BxPC-3-GPC1-KO xenografted mice. To assess the bystander killing activity of the humanized GPC1-ADC(MMAE), a mixture of GPC1-positive BxPC-3 and GPC1-negative BxPC-3-GPC1-KO-Luc cells were subcutaneously inoculated, and a heterogenous GPC1-expressing tumor model was developed. The humanized GPC1-ADC(MMAE) inhibited the tumor growth and decreased the luciferase signal, measured with an in vivo imaging system (IVIS), which suggests that the suppression of the BxPC-3-GPC1-KO-Luc population. The humanized GPC1-ADC(MMAE) also inhibited the established liver metastases of BxPC-3 cells and significantly improved the overall survival of the mice. It exhibited a potent antitumor effect on the GPC1-positive PDAC and ESCC patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models. Our preclinical data demonstrate that GPC1 is a promising therapeutic target for ADC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neo.2021.07.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8340053PMC
September 2021

Glycocalyx components affect platelet function, whole blood coagulation, and fibrinolysis: an in vitro study suggesting a link to trauma-induced coagulopathy.

BMC Anesthesiol 2021 03 19;21(1):83. Epub 2021 Mar 19.

Klinik für Anästhesiologie & Intensivmedizin, University of Duisburg-Essen & University Hospital of Essen, Hufelandstr. 55, 45122, Essen, Germany.

Background: The mechanisms of trauma induced coagulopathy (TIC) are considered multifactorial. Amongst others, however, shedding of the endothelial glycocalyx resulting in increased concentrations of glycocalyx fragments in plasma might also play a role. Thus, we hypothesized that shedded glycocalyx components affect coagulation and may act as humoral mediators of TIC.

Methods: To investigate effects of heparan sulfate, chondroitin sulfate, syndecan-1, versican, and thrombomodulin we added these fragments to in vitro assays of whole blood from healthy volunteers to yield concentrations observed in trauma patients. Platelet function, whole blood coagulation, and fibrinolysis were measured by standard coagulation tests, impedance aggregometry (IA), and viscoelastic tests (VET). To assess dose-response relationships, we performed IA with increasing concentrations of versican and VET with increasing concentrations of thrombomodulin.

Results: Intrinsically activated clotting times (i.e., activated partial thromboplastin time and intrinsically activated VET with and without heparinase) were unaffected by any glycocalyx fragment. Thrombomodulin, however, significantly and dose-dependently diminished fibrinolysis as assessed by VET with exogenously added rt-PA, and increased rt-PA-induced lysis Indices after 30 (up to 108% of control, p <  0,0001), 45 (up to 368% of control, p <  0,0001), and 60 min (up to 950% of control, p <  0,0001) in VET. Versican impaired platelet aggregation in response to arachidonic acid (up to - 37,6%, p <  0,0001), ADP (up to - 14,5%, p <  0,0001), and collagen (up to - 31,8%, p <  0,0001) in a dose-dependent manner, but did not affect TRAP-6 induced platelet aggregation. Clotting time in extrinsically activated VET was shortened by heparan sulfate (- 7,2%, p = 0,024), chondroitin sulfate (- 11,6%, p = 0,016), versican (- 13%, p = 0,012%), and when combined (- 7,2%, p = 0,007).

Conclusions: Glycocalyx components exert distinct inhibitory effects on platelet function, coagulation, and fibrinolysis. These data do not support a 'heparin-like auto-anticoagulation' by shed glycosaminoglycans but suggest a possible role of versican in trauma-induced thrombocytopathy and of thrombomodulin in trauma-associated impairment of endogenous fibrinolysis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12871-021-01300-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7977584PMC
March 2021

Preoperative elevated E/e' (≥ 15) with preserved ejection fraction is associated with the development of postoperative heart failure in intermediate-risk non-cardiac surgical patients.

J Anesth 2020 04 2;34(2):250-256. Epub 2020 Jan 2.

Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka, 812-8582, Japan.

Purpose: Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction is an independent risk factor for adverse cardiovascular morbidities and mortalities in cardiovascular and high-risk surgical patients. However, there were only a few investigations among intermediate-risk surgical patients. This study aimed to investigate postoperative heart failure (HF) in intermediate-risk surgical patients who had preoperative diastolic dysfunction with preserved ejection fraction (EF).

Methods: Consecutive patients underwent intermediate-risk surgery between January 2016 and December 2018 were retrospectively evaluated. Patients with preserved EF were divided into three groups using one of the parameters of diastolic function: the ratio of early diastolic filling velocity to the peak diastolic velocity of mitral medial annulus (E/e') ≥ 15, E/e' between 8 and 15, and E/e' < 8. Postoperative HF was defined as clinical symptoms and radiological evidence and low SpO less than 93%. The primary outcome was the incidence of postoperative HF and its relation to preoperative E/e'. Chi-squared test, unpaired t test with Welch's correction, and multivariate logistic regression were used for analysis.

Results: In total, 965 patients were included in the final analysis. Postoperative HF developed in 36/965 (3.7%) patients with preserved EF. The incidence of postoperative HF was stratified according to the E/e', and the rates of HF occurrence in patients with E/e' < 8, 8-15, and ≥ 15 were 1.8%, 2.7%, and 15%, respectively (P < 0.01).

Conclusion: Preoperative elevated E/e' (≥ 15) was associated with the development of postoperative HF in intermediate-risk surgical patients with preserved EF.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00540-019-02728-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7098923PMC
April 2020

Association between Preoperative Cardiac Left Ventricular Dysfunction and Perioperative Intraaortic Balloon Pump in Patients Undergoing Off-Pump Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery.

Heart Surg Forum 2017 08 25;20(4):E147-E152. Epub 2017 Aug 25.

Department of Anesthesiology, Fukuoka University School of Medicine, Fukuoka, Japan.

Background: Prophylactic use of intraaortic balloon pump (IABP) reduces hospital mortality in patients with left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG); however, its association in patients with LV diastolic dysfunction is unclear. This retrospective study investigated the association between preoperative LV function and perioperative use of IABP in patients undergoing off-pump CABG (OPCAB) at a university hospital.

Methods: 100 consecutive patients who underwent OPCAB between January 1, 2011 and August 31, 2014 were studied. Preoperative LV function was categorized into four groups based on LV systolic and diastolic function determined with preoperative transthoracic echocardiography. The use of IABP was reviewed from medical records. The Mann-Whitney test, Pearson chi-square test, or Fisher exact test were used.

Results: Patients were categorized into the following groups: normal LV function (n = 43), isolated LV systolic dysfunction (n = 13), isolated LV diastolic dysfunction (n = 21), and combined LV systolic and diastolic dysfunction (n = 14). Intraoperative IABP use was significantly more frequent in patients with isolated LV systolic dysfunction, isolated LV diastolic dysfunction, and combined LV systolic and diastolic dysfunction than in those with normal LV function (P < .05). Furthermore, IABP was used more frequently in patients who developed combined LV systolic and diastolic dysfunction postoperatively (P < .05). Conclusion: Not only the presence of preoperative systolic dysfunction but also LV diastolic dysfunction in the presence of normal LV systolic function were associated with increased use of IABP during and after OPCAB.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1532/hsf.1808DOI Listing
August 2017

A prospective randomized study of the use of an ultrathin colonoscope versus a pediatric colonoscope in sedation-optional colonoscopy.

Surg Endosc 2017 12 9;31(12):5150-5158. Epub 2017 May 9.

Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Toho University Ohashi Medical Center, 2-17-6 Ohashi, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, 153-8515, Japan.

Background: Ultrathin colonoscopes (UTC) reportedly produce less pain during colonoscopy than standard colonoscopes. The aim of this study was to assess the tolerability of an UTC compared with that of a pediatric colonoscope.

Methods: A total of 270 adult patients scheduled to undergo colonoscopy were randomized, with 134 allocated to the UTC group and 136 to the pediatric colonoscope group. Pain was assessed using a visual analog scale. For all procedures, sedation was administered only if requested. Overall pain, rate and time of cecal and terminal ileum intubation, number of patients requesting sedation, adenoma detection rates (ADR), and rate of complications were measured and analyzed.

Results: Among all patients, the medians of maximum pain and overall pain were significantly lower in the UTC group than in the pediatric colonoscope group (23 vs. 38, P < 0.001; 12 vs. 22, P = 0.0003, respectively). Significantly fewer patients requested sedation in the UTC group than in the pediatric colonoscope group (1.4 vs. 6.6%; P = 0.0269). No significant differences were seen in either the rate and time of successful cecal and terminal ileum intubation, or in other procedure-related outcomes, including ADR.

Conclusions: Compared with a pediatric colonoscope, the UTC was associated with reduced overall and maximum pain during colonoscopy, with no difference in ADR.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00464-017-5581-2DOI Listing
December 2017

Factors affecting the technical difficulty and clinical outcome of endoscopic submucosal dissection for colorectal tumors.

Surg Endosc 2014 Oct 23;28(10):2959-65. Epub 2014 May 23.

Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology , Department of Internal Medicine, Toho University Ohashi Medical Center, 2-17-6 Ohashi, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, 153-8515, Japan,

Background: Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for colorectal tumors is technically difficult due to the anatomy of the large intestine, with its narrow lumen, thin walls, and redundancy. Here, we assessed factors associated with incomplete resection and difficult colorectal ESD.

Methods: Between November 2009 and April 2013, we performed ESD on 151 consecutive colorectal tumors in 147 patients. We evaluated the clinical outcomes of all cases and conducted multiple logistic regression analysis of the following factors related to incomplete resection and difficult procedure: age, gender, location (right colon, left colon or rectum), tumor size (diameter ≥40 or <40 mm), operation time, morphology [granular-type laterally spreading tumor (LST-G), non-granular-type laterally spreading tumor (LST-NG), or protruded type], fibrosis, and paradoxical movement during the procedure. A procedure that required more than 120 min was defined as a difficult colorectal ESD.

Results: Average tumor size was 32.1 ± 10.7 mm, and the average procedure length was 71.8 ± 49.5 min. The rate of en bloc resection was 94.7%, while that of en bloc curative resection was 86.8%. Perforation occurred in 1.3% of the ESD procedures. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that only severe fibrosis [odds ratio (OR) 4.51; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.36-14.91, p = 0.014] contributed to incomplete resection and that a tumor size exceeding 40 mm (OR 5.73 [95% CI 1.66-19.74], p = 0.006), severe fibrosis (OR 23.31 [95% CI 6.59-82.54], p < 0.001), and paradoxical movement (OR 4.26 [95% CI 1.11-16.44], p = 0.035) were independent factors exacerbating the difficulty of colorectal ESD.

Conclusions: Severe fibrosis contributed to both incomplete resection and difficult colorectal ESD. Larger tumor size and paradoxical movement during the procedure were independent factors contributing to the difficulty of colorectal ESD. These factors might enable endoscopists to develop strategies for treating colorectal ESD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00464-014-3558-yDOI Listing
October 2014

Missed ascending colon cancer in an older patient with extensive ulcerative colitis.

BMJ Case Rep 2014 Mar 12;2014. Epub 2014 Mar 12.

Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Toho University Ohashi Medical Center, Tokyo, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bcr-2014-203783DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3962944PMC
March 2014

Gastric epithelioid-cell granuloma in a paediatric patient with Crohn's disease.

BMJ Case Rep 2014 Jan 20;2014. Epub 2014 Jan 20.

Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Toho University Ohashi Medical Center, Tokyo, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bcr-2013-203229DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3903080PMC
January 2014

Factors associated with delayed gastric emptying in patients with stent placement for malignant gastric outlet obstruction.

Endosc Int Open 2013 Dec;1(1):17-23

Department of Radiology, Toho University Ohashi Medical Center, Tokyo, Japan.

Background And Study Aims: Delayed gastric emptying (DGE) is an important factor in determining the clinical outcome in patients with stent placement for malignant gastric outlet obstruction but the factors associated with DGE remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate whether clinicopathologic data could be used to identify the factors for DGE in such patients.

Patients And Methods: A prospective, single-arm, observational clinical study was performed in a referral hospital in Japan. A total of 54 patients with stent placement for malignant gastric outlet obstruction were enrolled. A gastric emptying scintigraphy test was performed 1 week after stent placement. The relationship between DGE and clinicopathologic factors was investigated, and also the relationship between DGE and stent patency time, eating period (when the patient was able to maintain oral intake), and survival time.

Results: A total of 38.9 % (21 /54) of patients had DGE. The following were identified as independent predictive factors of DGE: opioid use (odds ratio, 5.32; 95 % confidence interval [95 %CI], 1.07 - 26.41; p = 0.04), chemotherapy before stent placement (odds ratio, 8.03; 95 %CI, 1.85 - 34.95; p = 0.006), and smaller stent diameter (odds ratio, 13.59; 95 %CI, 1.72 - 107.41; p = 0.01). No relationship was found between DGE and the level of oral intake, stent patency time, eating period, and survival time.

Conclusions: The factors associated with DGE after stent placement include those associated with the patient's tumor as well as factors relating to their treatment, including stenting. The clinical and functional results after stent placement appear to be unrelated to the gastric emptying findings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0033-1359266DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4440376PMC
December 2013

Colonoscopy using a small-caliber colonoscope with passive-bending after incomplete colonoscopy due to sharp angulation or pain.

Surg Endosc 2013 Nov 31;27(11):4171-6. Epub 2013 May 31.

Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Toho University Ohashi Medical Center, 2-17-6 Ohashi, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, 153-8515, Japan,

Background: We evaluated the performance of a newly developed small-caliber (SC) colonoscope (PCF-PQ260L). This colonoscope (diameter 9.2 mm) is designed with passive-bending and high-force transmission. The SC colonoscope was used for rescue colonoscopy following incomplete colonoscopy with a standard (SD) colonoscope caused by sharp angulation, loop formation, or pain.

Methods: Records of SC colonoscopy given to patients following an incomplete colonoscopy with the SD colonoscope and in the same session were analyzed. Cecal intubation rate, pain using a visual analog scale (0 = none, 100 = extremely painful) in the first and second colonoscopy, total time, new lesions detected with the SC colonoscopy, dosage of sedation used, and any complications were assessed. Examinations that could not be completed, because the colonoscope was not long enough to reach the cecum due to a redundant colon were excluded.

Results: The records of 43 patients who were given SC colonoscopy following incomplete examinations using the SD colonoscope were reviewed. In 97.7 % of cases (42/43), cecal intubation was achieved with the SC colonoscope in the same session. The mean pain score during colonoscopy was significantly lower for the second SC colonoscopy than for the first SD colonoscopy (40.6 ± 14.1 vs. 74.5 ± 10.8, P < 0.001). Lesions were detected with the SC colonoscope in 41.8 % of cases (18/43).

Conclusions: When a colonoscopy with SD colonoscope failed due to sharp angulations, loop formation, or pain, subsequent colonoscopy with a SC colonoscope increased cecal intubation and lesion detection rates and decreased severity of reported pain.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00464-013-3016-2DOI Listing
November 2013

A case of lansoprazole-associated collagenous colitis with longitudinal ulcer.

J Gastrointestin Liver Dis 2013 Mar;22(1)

Division of Gastroeneterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Toho University Ohashi Medical Center, Toho, Japan.

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March 2013

[Hypoxemia caused by retention of irrigation fluid to detect leaks from the lungs during subtotal esophagectomy].

Masui 2012 Dec;61(12):1339-41

Department of Anesthesiology, Fukuoka University Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka 814-0180.

We report a patient who developed hypoxemia caused by retention of irrigation fluid used to detect leaks from the lungs during subtotal esophagectomy. A 58-year-old man developed a sudden onset of hypoxemia with a decrease in tidal volume during subtotal esophagectomy. Chest X-ray revealed a homogeneous opacity of the left lung field, suggesting the presence of fluid in the pleural cavity on the left. The tidal volume and SpO2 increased after drainage of the fluid from the left pleural cavity. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on the 16th postoperative day.
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December 2012

Comparison of modified introducer method with pull method for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy: prospective randomized study.

Dig Endosc 2012 Nov 26;24(6):426-31. Epub 2012 Apr 26.

Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Toho University Ohashi Medical Center, Tokyo, Japan.

Aim: The pull method is associated with a high incidence of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) site infection. The introducer method has been shown to be less likely to cause infection, because it avoids the passage of a tube through the oropharynx. The aim of the present study was to compare the modified introducer method with the pull method for PEG.

Methods: The study included patients who were scheduled for PEG from April 2008 to April 2010. The patients were randomly assigned to receive PEG by the pull method (Group I) or the modified introducer method (Group II). We evaluated the incidence of PEG site infection, some infection-associated parameters and other complications. Wound infections were evaluated in accordance with the Jain's score.

Results: Of 62 patients enrolled, 31 patients were assigned to each of the two groups. One patient in Group I died on the day after PEG. The cause of death and relationship with PEG were unclear. Excluding this patient, 61 were included in the per-protocol analysis. The incidence of peristomal infection within 1 week was slightly lower in Group II than in Group I, albeit not statistically significant (12.9% vs 23.3%, P = 0.3354). White blood cell count (WBC) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were significantly lower in Group II (WBC: P = 0.0345, CRP: P = 0.0346). None of the patients underwent surgical procedures for the treatment of peristomal infection.

Conclusion: The results of the present study show that gastrostomy by the modified introducer method may be less likely, although not significantly, to cause peristomal infection than the pull method.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1443-1661.2012.01317.xDOI Listing
November 2012

Favorable long-term clinical outcome of uncovered D-weave stent placement as definitive palliative treatment for malignant colorectal obstruction.

Dis Colon Rectum 2012 Sep;55(9):983-9

Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Toho University Ohashi Medical Center, Tokyo, Japan.

Background: Most self-expandable metallic stents for colorectal placement are uncovered because of the high migration rate of covered stents. However, the optimal stent design for colorectal use remains unclear.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a double-wire woven uncovered stent for definitive palliative treatment of malignant colorectal obstruction.

Design: This study was a prospective, single-arm, observational clinical study of patients enrolled between December 2005 and September 2010.

Settings: This study was conducted at a referral hospital in Japan.

Patients: Twenty-four consecutive patients with malignant colorectal obstruction were included in the study.

Interventions: A double-wire woven uncovered stent was placed by use of a standard through-the-scope endoscopic placement technique.

Main Outcome Measures: Technical, initial clinical, and long-term clinical success were measured. Long-term clinical success was defined as sustained relief of obstructive symptoms without reintervention until the patient's death.

Results: The Karnofsky performance status score before stent placement was 60 (median, interquartile range, 42.5-67.5). Twenty of 24 patients had primary colorectal cancer, and 4 had extracolorectal malignancies. The site of obstruction was the ascending colon in 10 patients, descending colon in 4 patients, sigmoid colon in 7 patients, and rectum in 3 patients. Technical, initial, and long-term clinical success rates were 100%, 100%, and 83%. Median stent patency time was 149 days (interquartile range, 45-198 days). Median survival time after stent placement was 155 days (interquartile range, 68-231 days). Four patients (17%) had negative outcomes including stent occlusion by tumor ingrowth (8%) and stent migration (8%). The highest Karnofsky performance status score after stent placement was 70 (median; interquartile range, 50-70). The Karnofsky performance status score improved after stent placement (p = 0.002).

Limitations: This study was limited because it was a single-arm, single-center study, and it had a small sample size.

Conclusions: Endoscopic placement of double-wire woven uncovered stents is effective and safe as definitive palliative treatment for patients with malignant colorectal obstruction.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/DCR.0b013e31825c484dDOI Listing
September 2012

Cat scratch colon during tumor observation prior to endoscopic treatment.

J Gastrointestin Liver Dis 2012 Mar;21(1)

Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Toho University Ohashi Medical Center, Toho, Japan.

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March 2012

Gastrointestinal bleeding caused by gastritis cystica polyposa.

BMJ Case Rep 2011 Nov 8;2011. Epub 2011 Nov 8.

Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Toho University Ohashi Medical Center, Tokyo, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bcr.08.2011.4617DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3214209PMC
November 2011

Effect of environmental temperature on transdermal drug penetration.

Biol Pharm Bull 2010 ;33(12):1983-7

Kyushu Institute of Technology, Fukuoka, Japan.

The effect of environmental temperature on the penetration from matrix-type transdermal patch of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) as model drugs was investigated using in vitro and in silico experiment. The patch was applied on the stratum corneum (SC) side of the skin. The dermal side of the skin was mounted on a diffusion cell. The donor compartment of the diffusion cell was filled with distilled water. The donor temperature was set at 2, 25, 37, and 47 °C, respectively. The receptor compartment was kept at 37 °C and filled with phosphate buffer solution during the experiment. The permeation of the drugs from patch increased with increasing the donor temperature. The rate of permeation increased exponentially with increasing skin surface temperature. The diffusion coefficient in the skin remained almost constant, while the skin surface concentration was correlated with the skin surface temperature. The plasma concentrations in human were simulated by SKIN-CAD(®) together with the in vitro penetration experiment. The plasma concentration quickly changed with varying the environment temperature.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1248/bpb.33.1983DOI Listing
July 2011

Cecocolic intussusception.

Gastrointest Endosc 2011 Apr 9;73(4):818-9. Epub 2010 Nov 9.

Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Toho University Ohashi Medical Center, Tokyo, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gie.2010.09.038DOI Listing
April 2011

Efficacy of the revised Vienna Classification for diagnosing colorectal epithelial neoplasias.

World J Gastroenterol 2009 May;15(19):2351-6

Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Toho University Ohashi Medical Center, 2-17-6 Ohashi, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, Japan.

Aim: To prospectively investigate the efficacy of the revised Vienna Classification for diagnosing colorectal epithelial neoplastic lesions in cold biopsy specimens.

Methods: Patients were selected for inclusion if they had colorectal epithelial lesions that were not considered suitable for direct endoscopic resection. These included colorectal polyps > or = 10 mm and lesions suspected of being carcinomas capable of invading the colorectal submucosa or beyond, including strictures, based on the cold biopsies obtained from each lesion prior to resection. We investigated the relationship between diagnoses based on cold biopsy samples using the revised Vienna Classification and resected specimens of the same lesions, and the therapeutic implications of diagnoses made using the revised Vienna Classification. The same cold biopsy specimens were also examined using the Japanese Group Classification guidelines, and compared with the resected specimens of the same lesions for reference.

Results: A total of 179 lesions were identified. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of the revised Vienna Classification for distinguishing between intramucosal lesions and submucosal invasive carcinomas in cold biopsy specimens was 22.2%, 100%, 100%, and 71.4%, respectively, and for distinguishing between intramucosal lesions and those invading the submucosa or beyond was 59.7%, 100%, 100%, and 37.6%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of the Japanese Group Classification for distinguishing between intramucosal lesions and submucosal invasive carcinomas in cold biopsy specimens was 83.3%, 91.4%, 83.3%, and 91.4%, respectively, and for distinguishing between intramucosal lesions and those invading the submucosa or beyond was 95.1%, 91.4%, 97.9%, and 82.1%, respectively. A total of 137 of 144 carcinomas that had invaded the submucosa or beyond and three high-grade intraepithelial neoplasias were diagnosed as "carcinoma" using the Japanese Group Classification system.

Conclusion: The revised Vienna Classification for cold biopsy specimens has high positive predictive value in the diagnosis of colorectal carcinoma invasive to the submucosa or beyond.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2684601PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.3748/wjg.15.2351DOI Listing
May 2009

Left renal pseudocyst associated with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis.

BMJ Case Rep 2009 14;2009. Epub 2009 Apr 14.

Toho University Ohashi Medical Center, Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, 2-17-6 Ohashi, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, 153-8515, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bcr.08.2008.0608DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3029552PMC
November 2011

Colonic perforation after endoclip placement for delayed post-endoscopic-resection bleeding.

Gastrointest Endosc 2006 Nov 26;64(5):839-41. Epub 2006 Jul 26.

Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Toho University Ohashi Medical Center, 2-17-6 Ohashi, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8515, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gie.2006.03.914DOI Listing
November 2006

Predictive histopathologic factors for lymph node metastasis in patients with nonpedunculated submucosal invasive colorectal carcinoma.

Dis Colon Rectum 2005 Jan;48(1):92-100

Clinical Laboratory Division, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.

Purpose: Risk factors for lymph node metastasis in patients with nonpedunculated submucosal invasive colorectal carcinoma remain to be characterized. This study examines the relationship between lymph node metastasis and clinicopathologic factors in nonpedunculated submucosal invasive colorectal carcinoma.

Methods: The study cohort comprised 155 patients who had undergone surgical treatment for nonpedunculated submucosal invasive colorectal carcinoma. The clinicopathologic factors investigated included gender, age, tumor location, macroscopic type, tumor size, histologic type and grade, intramucosal growth pattern, lymphatic invasion, venous invasion, degree of focal dedifferentiation at the submucosal invasive front, status of the remaining muscularis mucosa, and the depth and width of submucosal invasion.

Results: Lymph node metastases were found in 19 patients (12.3 percent). Univariate analysis showed that lymphatic invasion, focal dedifferentiation at the submucosal invasive front, status of the remaining muscularis mucosa, and depth of submucosal invasion all had a significant influence on lymph node metastasis. Multivariate analysis showed lymphatic invasion (P = 0.014) and high-grade focal dedifferentiation at the submucosal invasive front (P = 0.049) to be independent factors predicting lymph node metastasis. No lymph node metastasis was found in tumors with a depth of submucosal invasion of <1.3 mm.

Conclusions: Lymphatic invasion and high-grade focal dedifferentiation at the submucosal invasive front are important predictors of lymph node metastasis in patients with nonpedunculated submucosal invasive colorectal carcinoma. Depth of submucosal invasion can be used as an identifying marker for patients who do not require subsequent surgery after endoscopic resection.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10350-004-0751-4DOI Listing
January 2005
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