Publications by authors named "Kelly Segars"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Dermatologic Applications of : A Literature Review.

J Clin Aesthet Dermatol 2021 Feb 1;14(2):50-60. Epub 2021 Feb 1.

Dr. Segars is with the Nova Southeastern University: College of Osteopathic Medicine and Largo Medical Center Department of Dermatology in Largo, Florida.

(PL) is a natural extract from tropical fern leaves with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. It has been implicated as a potential treatment agent in multiple dermatologic conditions. Here, we review the mechanism of action and current dermatologic applications of PL and extrapolate potential future dermatologic applications of PL. An extensive literature review on Pubmed was conducted in search of relevant background information and human studies utilizing PL for the treatment of dermatologic conditions. Using the PubMed database, a literature search was conducted to identify relevant publications. was input as the key search criterion. The results were filtered by species (human) and language (English). Only papers with dermatologic applications were selected. Additionally, relevant publications found in the reference sections of selected articles were manually searched and selected. Included articles explore the origin, basic science mechanism, and various dermatologic applications of PL studied in humans. Each article was thoroughly studied by all authors and applicable data from each was used for the compilation of this review article. See Table 1 for a summary of dermatologic applications of PL based on available human clinical studies. There was a limited number of human studies concerning the use of PL for treatment of dermatologic conditions and, of the available studies, many were of a small sample size. PL has a clinically significant role for the treatment and prevention of certain dermatologic conditions including: photoprotection, photocarcinogenesis, photoaging, vitiligo, melasma, and polymorphic light eruption. There is supporting evidence for its use in malignant melanoma high-risk patients, for enhanced actinic keratosis clearance following photodynamic therapy, and for symptomatic relief in atopic dermatitis. Potential clinical uses that require additional human clinical studies include solar urticaria, post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation, cutaneous lupus erythematosus, and other photosensitive cutaneous disorders.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8211346PMC
February 2021

Multicentric reticulohistiocytosis masquerading as cutaneous connective tissue disease.

Dermatol Online J 2021 Mar 15;27(3). Epub 2021 Mar 15.

Department of Dermatology, HCA Healthcare/USF Morsani College of Medicine Largo, FL.

Multicentric reticulohistiocytosis (MRH) is a rare type of non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis characterized by coral-toned papules with predilection for dorsal surfaces in addition to severe arthropathy. It sometimes proves difficult to differentiate these joint and skin findings clinically from certain rheumatologic diseases, primarily dermatomyositis. Herein, we present an 82-year-old woman who presented with the clinical findings described above and was subsequently diagnosed with MRH after biopsy and review of relevant clinical history. Because about 25% of patients diagnosed with MRH have an underlying occult malignancy, our patient underwent a complete malignancy workup that was negative. She was treated with systemic corticosteroids and methotrexate, which resulted in an improvement of the arthritis and constitutional symptoms. This case demonstrates that in patients with both rheumatologic and dermatologic symptoms, particularly on acral surfaces, MRH must be a diagnostic consideration. Identifying this disease early in its course can prevent negative consequences for the patients, specifically arthritis mutilans and upper airway involvement.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
March 2021

Drug-induced anti-Ro positive subacute cutaneous lupus in a man treated with olmesartan.

Dermatol Online J 2019 Dec 15;25(12). Epub 2019 Dec 15.

Hospital Corporation of America/University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine Graduate Medical Education: Department of Dermatology, Largo Medical Center Program, Largo, FL.

A 66-year-old man presented to the outpatient dermatology clinic with a chief complaint of a pruritic rash on his upper trunk and proximal upper extremities, which had been present for three weeks. Upon examination, he was found to have an erythematous, annular, and polycyclic eruption on the chest, upper back, and proximal extremities. A clinical diagnosis of subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) was made. The patient was found to have a positive anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) in a speckled pattern and a positive anti-Ro antibody. A biopsy revealed an interface and lichenoid dermatitis with dermal mucin deposition, consistent with subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus. The patient reported that he had recently been diagnosed with hypertension and began treatment with olmesartan, a potassium-sparing diuretic that blocks the angiotensin II receptor, commonly used as an antihypertensive or in patients with heart failure. Cutaneous reactions to olmesartan are rare and reported in <1% of patients in post-marketing surveillance. The patient discontinued use of olmesartan and the rash completely resolved within three weeks. To date, there are no other reported cases of drug induced SCLE in patients taking olmesartan to our knowledge.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
December 2019

Cutaneous ganglioneuroma: A case report and discussion of the literature.

J Cutan Pathol 2019 Apr 11;46(4):293-296. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Department of Dermatology, Largo Medical Center, Largo, Florida.

Ganglioneuromas (GNs) are benign tumors composed of ganglion cells in a Schwannian stroma. They are derived from neural crest cells that give rise to the sympathetic nervous system. Hence, GNs can be found anywhere a sympathetic ganglion is present. Most commonly, GNs are found in the posterior mediastinum and abdominal cavity. Within the abdominal cavity, they are most likely to be found in the retroperitoneal space or adrenal glands. Cutaneous involvement is uncommon and rarely reported in literature. We report an interesting case of a cutaneous ganglioneuroma on the abdomen of an 83-year-old male.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cup.13419DOI Listing
April 2019

Basaloid Follicular Hamartoma: A Case Report and a Novel Cosmetic Treatment.

J Clin Aesthet Dermatol 2018 Mar 1;11(3):39-41. Epub 2018 Mar 1.

Dr. Segars is with NSU-COM/Largo Medical Center Dermatology Residency in Largo, Florida.

Basaloid follicular hamartoma (BFH) is a rare, benign neoplasm of the hair follicle, characterized by multiple brown papules involving the face, scalp, and trunk. It is described by multiple clinical forms, and can present as localized or generalized. Diagnosis is made histologically via biopsy, which is important in order to distinguish BFH from basal cell carcinoma (BCC) or other malignant epithelial neoplasms. Correct diagnosis allows for the avoidance of unnecessary surgeries to remove benign lesions. While benign, lesions can be cosmetically unacceptable. A 68-year-old man with a two-year history of brown, homogenous papules on his face presented to discuss treatment options. A physical examination revealed hundreds of dark brown, 1- to 3mm verrucous papules distributed throughout the face. Two punch biopsies revealed histologic features consistent with BFH. BFHs classically present with multiple 1- to 2mm tan-to-brown-colored papules distributed on the face, scalp, neck, axilla, trunk, and pubic area. Differential diagnoses can include nevus sebaceous, lichen striatus, linear epidermal nevus, and basal cell nevus. BFH arises from a mutation in the patch gene, the same gene thought to cause nevoid BCC syndrome. Histologic examination of BFH lesions is essential to diagnosis. No standard of care exists for BFH; treatment options remain limited. This patient was treated with three rounds of pulsed dye laser (PDL) therapy and showed marked improvement in the treated areas. The authors propose PDL to be a safe, effective, and novel cosmetic treatment for BFH and potentially other adnexal tumors.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5868784PMC
March 2018

Myxoid Dermatofibrosarcoma Protuberans of the Abdomen.

Eplasty 2016 4;16:ic1. Epub 2016 Jan 4.

Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine, Tampa; H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Fla.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4711339PMC
January 2016

Aggressive Digital Papillary Adenocarcinoma.

Eplasty 2015 9;15:ic60. Epub 2015 Nov 9.

Florida Orthopedic Institute, Tampa.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4644354PMC
November 2015

Nevus Sebaceus of Jadassohn.

Eplasty 2015 20;15:ic38. Epub 2015 Jul 20.

Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Morsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4518814PMC
August 2015

Squamoid Eccrine Ductal Carcinoma.

Eplasty 2015 22;15:ic33. Epub 2015 Jun 22.

Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine, Tampa.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4482200PMC
July 2015
-->