Publications by authors named "Kelly McGraw"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Psychological Functioning of Children and Adolescents With Eosinophil-Associated Gastrointestinal Disorders.

Child Health Care 2010 Oct;39(4):266-278

Division of Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH.

This study examined health-related quality of life and adjustment among children with eosinophil- associated gastrointestinal disorders (EGID) compared with an age-matched sample without acute or chronic illness. Participants were youth ages 2 to 18 years. Children and caregivers completed measures of psychological symptoms and health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Significant group differences were found for child report of depressive, as well as anxiety symptoms. Significant group differences were also found for caregiver report of psychological symptoms and social skills. Finally, based on parent and youth report, HRQOL and greater school absenteeism were associated with EGID diagnosis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02739615.2010.515927DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3082134PMC
October 2010

Psychosocial functioning in children and adolescents with gastrointestinal complaints and disorders.

J Clin Psychol Med Settings 2010 Jun;17(2):159-66

Division of Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, and University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 3333 Burnet Ave.-MLC 7039, Cincinnati, OH 45229-3039, USA.

The current study examined the prevalence and presentation of psychosocial symptoms in pediatric patients and their parents presenting for first time appointments at a gastroenterology (GI) clinic compared to healthy controls (HC). One hundred GI patients, aged 8-17 years, and their mothers were compared to 100 age- and gender-matched HC on measures of child and parental behavioral/psychosocial functioning, depression, and anxiety. Results revealed significant correlations between mother- and child-reported internalizing behaviors and psychological symptoms. Significant group differences were observed in internalizing problems, adaptive and social skills, and leadership competency, as well as parental interpersonal sensitivity, depression, phobic anxiety, and number of psychological symptoms. GI patients are at increased risk for psychosocial and social dysfunction compared to healthy peers. Psychosocial factors should be considered when assessing patients in GI clinics. Patients might benefit from treatment plans that involve adjunctive behavioral intervention to assist patients in managing their conditions.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10880-010-9193-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2878853PMC
June 2010

Pretreatment attrition and childhood social phobia: Parental concerns about medication.

J Anxiety Disord 2006 25;20(8):1133-47. Epub 2006 Apr 25.

Maryland Center for Anxiety Disorders, Department of Psychology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USA.

Pretreatment attrition, the systematic self-exclusion of potential participants during the recruitment phase of a study, poses a significant threat to the external validity of randomized clinical trials. Very little is known about the factors that contribute to pretreatment attrition, especially among families seeking treatment for a child. The current study assessed pretreatment attrition in a randomized clinical trial of behavior therapy, fluoxetine, and placebo for child and adolescent social phobia. Reluctance toward medication treatment accounted for 44.7% of study refusals and was disproportionately common among ethnic minority families. Parents were particularly worried about the potential for side effects or physical/psychological dependency upon the medication. Results are discussed in terms of the implications for external validity in future psychopharmacological clinical trials.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.janxdis.2006.03.007DOI Listing
March 2007

Inpatient pediatric consultation-liaison: a case-controlled study.

J Pediatr Psychol 2003 Sep;28(6):423-32

University of Louisville School of Medicine, Kentucky 40202, USA.

Objective: To conduct a prospective case-controlled study of pediatric inpatients referred for consultation in a tertiary care children's medical center.

Method: Referrals (n = 104) were matched with nonreferrals (n = 104) for age (4 to 18 years), gender, and illness type/severity and completed parent- and self-report (dependent on age) behavioral rating scales to assess for adjustment/functioning. Nurses completed in-hospital ratings of behavioral/adjustment difficulties. Goal attainment and satisfaction ratings were obtained from the referring physicians, parents/guardians, and the consultant.

Results: Referrals exhibited more behavior/adjustment/coping difficulties than nonreferrals by parent, nurse, and self report. Frequently employed interventions included coping-strategies intervention, cognitive and behavioral therapies, and case management. Referring physician and consultant ratings of goal attainment were high, as were physician ratings of satisfaction and parent/guardian ratings of overall helpfulness.

Conclusions: Pediatric inpatients referred by their physicians had significantly more internalizing and externalizing disturbances than their nonreferred hospitalized peers. Many of the behavioral and adjustment problems that lead to in-hospital consultation referral were evident in global behavior difficulties prior to hospitalization. Referring pediatricians, parents/guardians, and consultants rate the outcome as benefiting the patients via assisting in the overall management of their health concerns, coping, and adjustment.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jpepsy/jsg032DOI Listing
September 2003