Publications by authors named "Kelly M Brunt"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Accelerating Ice Loss From Peripheral Glaciers in North Greenland.

Geophys Res Lett 2022 Jun 16;49(12):e2022GL098915. Epub 2022 Jun 16.

Department of Geosciences and Natural Resources University of Copenhagen Copenhagen Denmark.

In recent decades, Greenland's peripheral glaciers have experienced large-scale mass loss, resulting in a substantial contribution to sea level rise. While their total area of Greenland ice cover is relatively small (4%), their mass loss is disproportionally large compared to the Greenland ice sheet. Satellite altimetry from Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) and ICESat-2 shows that mass loss from Greenland's peripheral glaciers increased from 27.2 ± 6.2 Gt/yr (February 2003-October 2009) to 42.3 ± 6.2 Gt/yr (October 2018-December 2021). These relatively small glaciers now constitute 11 ± 2% of Greenland's ice loss and contribute to global sea level rise. In the period October 2018-December 2021, mass loss increased by a factor of four for peripheral glaciers in North Greenland. While peripheral glacier mass loss is widespread, we also observe a complex regional pattern where increases in precipitation at high altitudes have partially counteracted increases in melt at low altitude.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2022GL098915DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9286807PMC
June 2022

The Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite - 2 Mission: A Global Geolocated Photon Product Derived From the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System.

Remote Sens Environ 2019 Nov;233

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD United States.

The Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite - 2 (ICESat-2) observatory was launched on 15 September 2018 to measure ice sheet and glacier elevation change, sea ice freeboard, and enable the determination of the heights of Earth's forests. ICESat-2's laser altimeter, the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS) uses green (532 nm) laser light and single-photon sensitive detection to measure time of flight and subsequently surface height along each of its six beams. In this paper, we describe the major components of ATLAS, including the transmitter, the receiver and the components of the timing system. We present the major components of the ICESat-2 observatory, including the Global Positioning System, star trackers and inertial measurement unit. The ICESat-2 Level 1B data product (ATL02) provides the precise photon round-trip time of flight, among other data. The ICESat-2 Level 2A data product (ATL03) combines the photon times of flight with the observatory position and attitude to determine the geodetic location (i.e. the latitude, longitude and height) of the ground bounce point of photons detected by ATLAS. The ATL03 data product is used by higher-level (Level 3A) surface-specific data products to determine glacier and ice sheet height, sea ice freeboard, vegetation canopy height, ocean surface topography, and inland water body height.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rse.2019.111325DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6839705PMC
November 2019

ICESat/GLAS Altimetry Measurements: Received Signal Dynamic Range and Saturation Correction.

IEEE Trans Geosci Remote Sens 2017 Oct 25;55(10):5440-5454. Epub 2017 Jul 25.

Solar Exploration Division, National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA

NASA's Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat), which operated between 2003 and 2009, made the first satellite-based global lidar measurement of Earth's ice sheet elevations, sea-ice thickness and vegetation canopy structure. The primary instrument on ICESat was the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS), which measured the distance from the spacecraft to Earth's surface via the roundtrip travel time of individual laser pulses. GLAS utilized pulsed lasers and a direct detection receiver consisting of a silicon avalanche photodiode (Si APD) and a waveform digitizer. Early in the mission, the peak power of the received signal from snow and ice surfaces was found to span a wider dynamic range than planned, often exceeding the linear dynamic range of the GLAS 1064-nm detector assembly. The resulting saturation of the receiver distorted the recorded signal and resulted in range biases as large as ~50 cm for ice and snow-covered surfaces. We developed a correction for this "saturation range bias" based on laboratory tests using a spare flight detector, and refined the correction by comparing GLAS elevation estimates to those derived from Global Positioning System (GPS) surveys over the calibration site at the salar de Uyuni, Bolivia. Applying the saturation correction largely eliminated the range bias due to receiver saturation for affected ICESat measurements over Uyuni and significantly reduced the discrepancies at orbit crossovers located on flat regions of the Antarctic ice sheet.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/TGRS.2017.2702126DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6110114PMC
October 2017
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