Publications by authors named "Keita Ishijima"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Histopathological Characterization of Cases of Spontaneous Fatal Feline Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome, Japan.

Emerg Infect Dis 2021 Apr;27(4):1068-1076

Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is an emerging tickborne infectious disease caused by SFTS virus (SFTSV). We report 7 cases of spontaneous fatal SFTS in felines. Necropsies revealed characteristic lesions, including necrotizing lymphadenitis in 5 cases and necrotizing splenitis and SFTSV-positive blastic lymphocytes in all cases. We detected hemorrhagic lesions in the gastrointestinal tract in 6 cases and lungs in 3 cases, suggesting a more severe clinical course of SFTS in felids than in humans. We noted necrotic or ulcerative foci in the gastrointestinal tract in 3 cases, the lung in 2 cases, and the liver in 4 cases. We clarified that blastic lymphocytes are predominant targets of SFTSV and involved in induction of necrotic foci. We also found that thymic epithelial cells were additional targets of SFTSV. These results provide insights for diagnosing feline SFTS during pathological examination and demonstrate the similarity of feline and human SFTS cases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2704.204148DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8007303PMC
April 2021

A serological survey and characterization of Getah virus in domestic pigs in Thailand, 2017-2018.

Transbound Emerg Dis 2021 Feb 22. Epub 2021 Feb 22.

Faculty of Veterinary Technology, Kasetsart University, Bangkok, Thailand.

Getah virus (GETV) is a mosquito-borne RNA virus belonging to the family Togaviridae, genus Alphavirus. GETV infection causes diarrhoea and death in piglets, and reproductive failure and abortion in sows. This study conducted a serological survey of GETV infection among domestic pig populations in Thailand. ELISA was used to analyse 1,188 pig serum samples collected from 11 provinces of Thailand during 2017-2018, with 23.1% of the samples being positive for anti-GETV antibodies. The positive ratio of anti-GETV antibodies was significantly higher in nursery (67.9%) and older stages (84.5%) of pigs than in finishing stage (14.2%). Furthermore, we successfully isolated GETV from one pig serum, designated as GETV strain GETV/SW/Thailand/2017, and determined the complete genome sequence (11,689 nt). Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that our isolate was different from the recent GETV group spreading among pig populations in East Asia and formed a cluster with two GETV strains, namely YN12031 (China, 2015) and LEIV16275Mar (Far-East Russia, 2007). We concluded that two different GETV groups are currently spreading among pig populations in Asian countries.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tbed.14042DOI Listing
February 2021

Seroprevalence of Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus in Small-Animal Veterinarians and Nurses in the Japanese Prefecture with the Highest Case Load.

Viruses 2021 02 2;13(2). Epub 2021 Feb 2.

Center for Animal Disease Control, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki 889-2192, Japan.

Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) is the causative agent of SFTS, an emerging tick-borne disease in East Asia, and is maintained in enzootic cycles involving ticks and a range of wild animal hosts. Direct transmission of SFTSV from cats and dogs to humans has been identified in Japan, suggesting that veterinarians and veterinary nurses involved in small-animal practice are at occupational risk of SFTSV infection. To characterize this risk, we performed a sero-epidemiological survey in small-animal-practice workers and healthy blood donors in Miyazaki prefecture, which is the prefecture with the highest per capita number of recorded cases of SFTS in Japan. Three small-animal-practice workers were identified as seropositive by ELISA, but one had a negative neutralization-test result and so was finally determined to be seronegative, giving a seropositive rate of 2.2% (2 of 90), which was significantly higher than that in healthy blood donors (0%, 0 of 1000; < 0.05). The seroprevalence identified here in small-animal-practice workers was slightly higher than that previously reported in other high-risk workers engaged in agriculture and forestry in Japan. Thus, enhancement of small-animal-practice workers' awareness of biosafety at animal hospitals is necessary for control of SFTSV.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/v13020229DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7912989PMC
February 2021

Mosquito-borne viruses, insect-specific flaviviruses (family Flaviviridae, genus Flavivirus), Banna virus (family Reoviridae, genus Seadornavirus), Bogor virus (unassigned member of family Permutotetraviridae), and alphamesoniviruses 2 and 3 (family Mesoniviridae, genus Alphamesonivirus) isolated from Indonesian mosquitoes.

J Vet Med Sci 2020 Jul 25;82(7):1030-1041. Epub 2020 May 25.

Laboratory of Veterinary Microbiology, Joint Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Yamaguchi University, 1677-1 Yoshida, Yamaguchi 753-8515, Japan.

Mosquitoes transmit many kinds of arboviruses (arthropod-borne viruses), and numerous arboviral diseases have become serious problems in Indonesia. In this study, we conducted surveillance of mosquito-borne viruses at several sites in Indonesia during 2016-2018 for risk assessment of arbovirus infection and analysis of virus biodiversity in mosquito populations. We collected 10,015 mosquitoes comprising at least 11 species from 4 genera. Major collected mosquito species were Culex quinquefasciatus, Aedes albopictus, Culex tritaeniorhynchus, Aedes aegypti, and Armigeres subalbatus. The collected mosquitoes were divided into 285 pools and used for virus isolation using two mammalian cell lines, Vero and BHK-21, and one mosquito cell line, C6/36. Seventy-two pools showed clear cytopathic effects only in C6/36 cells. Using RT-PCR and next-generation sequencing approaches, these isolates were identified as insect flaviviruses (family Flaviviridae, genus Flavivirus), Banna virus (family Reoviridae, genus Seadornavirus), new permutotetravirus (designed as Bogor virus) (family Permutotetraviridae, genus Alphapermutotetravirus), and alphamesoniviruses 2 and 3 (family Mesoniviridae, genus Alphamesonivirus). We believed that this large surveillance of mosquitoes and mosquito-borne viruses provides basic information for the prevention and control of emerging and re-emerging arboviral diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1292/jvms.20-0261DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7399325PMC
July 2020

Effective methods for the inactivation of Francisella tularensis.

PLoS One 2019 14;14(11):e0225177. Epub 2019 Nov 14.

Department of Veterinary Science, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo Japan.

Francisella tularensis (F. tularensis) is highly pathogenic to humans and must be handled under biosafety level 3 conditions. Samples used for the diagnosis and experimental analysis must be completely inactivated, although methods for the inactivation of F. tularensis are limited. In this study, effective methods for the inactivation of F. tularensis SCHU P9 and five other strains were determined by comparisons of colony-forming units between treated and control samples. The results showed that F. tularensis SCHU P9 was denatured by heat treatment (94°C for 3 min and 56°C for 30 min), filtration with a 0.22 μm filter, and the use of various solutions (i.e. >70% ethanol, methanol, acetone, and 4% paraformaldehyde). F. tularensis SCHU P9 remained viable after treatment with 50% ethanol for 1 min, filtration with a 0.45 μm filter, and treatments with detergents (i.e. 1% lithium dodecyl sulfate buffer, 1% Triton X-100 and 1% Nonidet P-40) at 4°C for 24 h. Additionally, F. tularensis SCHU P9 suspended in fetal bovine serum in plastic tubes was highly resistant to ultraviolet radiation compared to suspensions in water and chemically defined medium. The methods for inactivation of F. tularensis SCHU P9 was applicable to the other five strains of F. tularensis. The data presented in this study could be useful for the establishment of guidelines and standard operating procedures (SOP) to inactivate the contaminated samples in not only F. tularensis but also other bacteria.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0225177PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6855423PMC
March 2020