Publications by authors named "Keighly Bradbrook"

5 Publications

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Sinus Surgery: Analysis of Videos Available Online.

Allergy Rhinol (Providence) 2021 Jan-Dec;12:2152656721993420. Epub 2021 Feb 11.

Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, Virginia.

Objectives: YouTube is the second most visited website in the world and can be a useful resource for patients to gain insight into surgical procedures. A multitude of studies have evaluated the quality of otolaryngology-specific healthcare information available on the YouTube platform, but to our knowledge, the online content regarding functional endoscopic sinus surgery available on this site has not been systematically evaluated.

Study Design: Cross sectional study.

Setting: Online.

Methods: YouTube was searched using the keywords "sinus surgery." Variables including video length, total number of views, authorship (academic, private practice physician, patient, or third party), objective (advertisement, informative, or patient perspective), inclusion of intra-operative footage, and discussion of balloon sinuplasty were recorded and analyzed by a single reviewer.

Results: Two-hundred twenty-two videos met inclusion criteria, with a median length of 4 minutes, and a median of 3349 views. The majority of videos were informative (n = 145, 65%), narrated (n = 151, 68%), and did not mention balloon sinuplasty (n = 189, 85%) nor contain intra-operative footage (n = 116, 52%). Private practice physicians were the most common authors (n = 113, 51%), followed by patients (n = 70, 32%), third parties (n = 28, 13%) and academics (n = 11, 5%).

Conclusions: Sinus surgery is one of the most common ambulatory procedures performed. Online resources such as YouTube can be useful for improving health literacy and patient comfort with medical topics such as functional endoscopic sinus surgery, but it is important for clinicians and patients to understand that there is a spectrum in the authorship, content, and quality of sinus surgery related videos posted online.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2152656721993420DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7882749PMC
February 2021

Sleep Inconsistency and Markers of Inflammation.

Front Neurol 2020 16;11:1042. Epub 2020 Sep 16.

Department of Biostatistics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, United States.

Poor sleep is associated with higher levels of inflammatory biomarkers. Conventionally, higher average time awake, lower average time asleep, and lower sleep efficiency define poor sleep. Recent research suggests that, in addition to average sleep, sleep inconsistency is an important indicator of sleep dysfunction. The current study sought to extend our knowledge of the relationship between sleep and inflammation through an examination of sleep inconsistency and inflammatory biomarkers. Secondary analyses of the Survey of Midlife in the United States (MIDUS) sleep study were conducted. Five hundred thirty-three individuals completed nightly sleep diaries, actigraphy, and underwent a blood draw for the inflammatory biomarkers C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and fibrinogen. Sleep inconsistency was derived from 7 consecutive nights of assessment and was operationalized as nightly fluctuations in the following variables: terminal wakefulness, number of awakenings, time in bed, sleep onset latency, and wake after sleep onset. Structural equation modeling was used to examine the influence of a latent average sleep and a latent sleep inconsistency variable on a latent inflammation variable. Models were subsequently adjusted for age, sex, BMI, health, and medication. Stratified models by sex were also analyzed. The average sleep model would not converge. The sleep inconsistency model fit the data well. A significant positive association between the latent factors sleep inconsistency and inflammation was observed (β = 10.18, = 4.40, = 0.021), suggesting inconsistent sleep is associated with higher levels of inflammatory biomarkers. When stratified by sex, the association between the latent sleep inconsistency factor and inflammation was significant for women (β = 1.93, = 0.82, = 0.018), but not men (β = 0.20, = 0.35, = 0.566). The association between sleep inconsistency and inflammation weakened following multivariate adjustment (β = 6.23, = 3.71, = 0.093). Inconsistent sleep may be an associated feature of inflammatory dysfunction, especially in women. Future studies should build upon this preliminary work and examine these associations longitudinally and through treatment trials.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fneur.2020.01042DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7525126PMC
September 2020

Social health needs and promotive health factors scale for college students: Scale development and initial validation.

J Am Coll Health 2020 Feb 26:1-10. Epub 2020 Feb 26.

Department of Biostatistics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, USA.

The psychometric properties of a measure of social determinants of health for college students entitled, The LIFESCREEN-C was developed. A sample of 226 college students completing an online survey during the 2018-2019 academic year. Tetrachoric correlations were used to confirm a three factor model. Results found model fit; convergent validity with a measure of general health; and adequate internal reliability. The three model fit included: general social health needs, college student social health needs, and promotive social health factors. Implications for health professionals in college settings concludes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07448481.2020.1725021DOI Listing
February 2020

A Survey of Adult and Pediatric Cardiology Fellows on Training Received in Family Planning Counseling.

J Womens Health (Larchmt) 2020 02 25;29(2):237-241. Epub 2019 Jan 25.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, Virginia.

This 2016 study aimed to investigate the training in contraception and preconception counseling received by cardiovascular science fellows. The authors surveyed current adult and pediatric cardiology fellows in the United States. Questions assessed the availability of family planning counseling training within their training program, current practices of contraception and preconception counseling, and use of available tools for risk stratification of patients. Bivariate logistic regressions were utilized to predict demographic variables associated with survey responses, and associations between hours of training or perceived preparedness and clinical use of training. There were 101 survey responses. Most participating fellows disagreed that their fellowship training had prepared them to counsel patients on contraception (69%) and preconception planning (62%). Sixty-one percent of participants do not routinely discuss contraception options and 55% do not routinely discuss preconception counseling with reproductive-age female patients at routine visits. Having more than 1 hour of training was predictive of more consistent counseling for both contraception and preconception counseling. Approximately 40% of participants routinely refer patients to an OB/Gyn for contraception or preconception counseling. This study highlights the need for increased training in contraceptive and preconception counseling within adult and pediatric cardiology fellowship programs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/jwh.2018.7186DOI Listing
February 2020

Corticosterone mediates the synaptic and behavioral effects of chronic stress at rat hippocampal temporoammonic synapses.

J Neurophysiol 2015 Sep 15;114(3):1713-24. Epub 2015 Jul 15.

Department of Physiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; Department of Psychiatry, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; Programs in Neuroscience and Membrane Biology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland;

Chronic stress is thought to impart risk for depression via alterations in brain structure and function, but contributions of specific mediators in generating these changes remain unclear. We test the hypothesis that stress-induced increases in corticosterone (CORT), the primary rodent glucocorticoid, are the key mediator of stress-induced depressive-like behavioral changes and synaptic dysfunction in the rat hippocampus. In rats, we correlated changes in cognitive and affective behavioral tasks (spatial memory consolidation, anhedonia, and neohypophagia) with impaired excitatory strength at temporoammonic-CA1 (TA-CA1) synapses, an archetypical stress-sensitive excitatory synapse. We tested whether elevated CORT was sufficient and necessary to generate a depressive-like behavioral phenotype and decreased excitatory signaling observed at TA-CA1 after chronic unpredictable stress (CUS). Chronic CORT administration induced an anhedonia-like behavioral state and neohypophagic behavior. Like CUS, chronic, but not acute, CORT generated an impaired synaptic phenotype characterized by reduced α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)-preferring glutamate receptor-mediated excitation at TA-CA1 synapses, decreased AMPA-type glutamate receptor subunit 1 protein expression, and altered serotonin-1B receptor-mediated potentiation. Repeatedly blunting stress-induced increases of CORT during CUS with the CORT synthesis inhibitor metyrapone (MET) prevented these stress-induced neurobehavioral changes. MET also prevented the CUS-induced impairment of spatial memory consolidation. We conclude that corticosterone is sufficient and necessary to mediate glutamatergic dysfunction underlying stress-induced synaptic and behavioral phenotypes. Our results indicate that chronic excessive glucocorticoids cause specific synaptic deficits in the hippocampus, a major center for cognitive and emotional processing, that accompany stress-induced behavioral dysfunction. Maintaining excitatory strength at stress-sensitive synapses at key loci throughout corticomesolimbic reward circuitry appears critical for maintaining normal cognitive and emotional behavior.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/jn.00359.2015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4567614PMC
September 2015