Publications by authors named "Kebadnew Mulatu Mihrete"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A 45-year-old female patient with Sheehan's syndrome presenting with imminent adrenal crisis: a case report.

J Med Case Rep 2021 May 8;15(1):229. Epub 2021 May 8.

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Bahir Dar University, Bahir Dar, Ethiopia.

Background: Sheehan's syndrome is hypopituitarism due to pituitary gland necrosis resulting from hemorrhagic shock during pregnancy. It is a rare complication with varied manifestations and a considerable delay in diagnosis.

Case Presentation: We describe the case of a 45-year-old Ethiopian woman who presented with generalized fatigue for 18 years which progressed to anorexia, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain of 6 years' duration, for which she was treated symptomatically throughout these years. Complete clinical evaluation, endocrine studies, and pituitary magnetic resonance scan revealed hypopituitarism secondary to Sheehan's syndrome. She had significant improvement noted following the commencement of hormone replacement therapy.

Conclusion: Previous case reports describe patients being diagnosed after one or more complications from long-term panhypopituitarism. The present case illustrates that undiagnosed Sheehan's syndrome is associated with long-term morbidity, and we want to emphasize that a high index of suspicion is crucial for the early diagnosis of the syndrome in routine clinical visits in order to prevent complications arising with delayed diagnosis. Awareness among clinicians is also essential so that such cases are not overlooked, especially in developing nations, where home delivery is still common and obstetric care is limited.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13256-021-02827-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8105925PMC
May 2021

Factors influencing women's access to the maternity waiting home in rural Southwest Ethiopia: a qualitative exploration.

BMC Pregnancy Childbirth 2020 May 14;20(1):296. Epub 2020 May 14.

Departments of Epidemiology and Biostatics, Bahir Dar University, Bahir Dar, Ethiopia.

Background: Maternity Waiting Homes (MWHs) have been advocated to improve the utilization of skilled birth attendants. Nevertheless, delivery attended by skilled personnel is low in Ethiopia and may indicate that the utilization of MWH is also low. The aim of this study is to explore the factors influencing women's access to the MWHs in rural Southwest Ethiopia.

Methods: Qualitative data were collected through focus group discussions with MWHs users and in-depth interviews with MWHs non-users, health extension workers and the clinicians. Four focus group discussions and 18 in-depth interviews were conducted between May 1 and June 1, 2017. Furthermore, observations were made to assess the availability of basic facilities at selected MWHs. Data were thematically analyzed using NVivo version 7. The concept of access defined by Thiede et al was applied to guide the analysis.

Results: Women had interest on MWHs and are aware of the existence of MWHs in their immediate vicinity. Health information disseminations and referral linkages by frontline health workers enabled women to timely access the MWHs. However, Women didn't understand the aims and benefits of MWHs. At the facility level, there were attempts to improve the acceptability of MWHs by allowing women to choose their delivery positions. But, participants claimed lack of privacy and presence of disrespectful care. Physical barriers (long distance, unavailability of transport options & unfavorable roads) were considered as potential problems for women residing in remote areas. MWH users mentioned absences of sufficient basic facilities, poor quality and varieties of food. Because of insufficient facilities, the cost of living was high for most users. The communities try to overcome the indirect costs through contributions in-kind and in-cash.

Conclusions: The factors influencing women's access to the MWHs were structural and individual and resonate with Thiede et al. dimensions of access. A better understanding of which factors are most influential in preventing women's access to the MWHs in rural Southwest Ethiopia is needed to appropriately target interventions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12884-020-02988-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7226938PMC
May 2020

Determinants of unjustified cesarean section in two hospitals southwestern Ethiopia: retrospective record review.

BMC Res Notes 2018 Apr 3;11(1):219. Epub 2018 Apr 3.

Department of Public Health, College of Health Sciences, Mizan-Tepi University, Mizan, Ethiopia.

Objective: The study aimed to identify determinants of unjustified cesarean section in two hospitals southwestern Ethiopia using retrospective record review from January 2015 to January 2016.

Result: A total of 727 charts were included in the analysis. About 25% of the study participants had delivered by cesarean section in 1 year. Antenatal care visit (AOR = 0.003, 95% CI 0.00-0.07), labor abnormality (AOR = 10.1, 95% CI 4.61-22.1), and post term pregnancy (AOR = 10.6, 95% CI 4.85-23.1) were significantly associated with cesarean section when compared to their respective counterparts.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13104-018-3336-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5883883PMC
April 2018

Determinants of stillbirth in Bonga General and Mizan Tepi University Teaching Hospitals southwestern Ethiopia, 2016: a case-control study.

BMC Res Notes 2017 Dec 7;10(1):713. Epub 2017 Dec 7.

School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Bahir Dar University, Bahir Dar, Ethiopia.

Objective: This study aimed to identify determinants of still birth in selected hospitals of Southwestern Ethiopia.

Result: A total 540 charts registered for maternal health services utilization were included in the analysis with proportion of case to control ratio of one to three (135 cases, 405 control). Women who attended antenatal care were 40% less risk for stillbirth compared to those who did not attend antenatal care (AOR = 0.6, 95% CI 0.39, 0.94). Those who had labor length ≥ 24 h were 2.4 times at risk to have still birth than ≤ 24 h (AOR = 2.44, 95% CI 1.4, 4.26). Women who developed uterine rupture were about 5 times more likely to have still birth than did not develop the complication (AOR = 4.9, 95% CI 1.67, 14.35). Women who have different antenatal risks were 4.5 times more likely to have still birth (AOR = 4.58, 95% CI 1.45, 14.48). Weight of baby ≥ 2.5 kg were 73% less likely to still birth when compared to counterparts (AOR = 0.27, 95% CI 0.14, 0.53).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13104-017-3058-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6389129PMC
December 2017