Publications by authors named "Kayla D Brown"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Allergic Diseases and Immune-Mediated Food Disorders in Pediatric Acute-Onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome.

Pediatr Allergy Immunol Pulmonol 2018 Sep 17;31(3):158-165. Epub 2018 Sep 17.

Division of Immunology, Allergy and Rheumatology, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California.

The prevalence and impact of allergic and immune-mediated food disorders in pediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndrome (PANS) are mostly unknown. We sought to explore the prevalence of atopic dermatitis (AD), asthma, allergic rhinitis (AR), IgE-mediated food allergies (FAs), and other immune-mediated food disorders requiring food avoidance in patients with PANS. In addition, to further understand the extent of food restriction in this population, we investigated the empiric use of dietary measures to improve PANS symptoms. Pediatric patients in a PANS Clinic and Research Program were given surveys regarding their caregiver burdens, allergic and food-related medical history, and whether food elimination resulted in perception of improvement of PANS symptoms. A review of health records was conducted to confirm that all responses in the survey were concordant with documentation of each patient's medical chart. Sixty-nine (ages 4-20 years) of 80 subjects who fulfilled PANS criteria completed the surveys. Thirteen (18.8%) had AD, 11 (15.9%) asthma, 33 (47.8%) AR, 11 (15.9%) FA, 1 (1.4%) eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders, 1 (1.4%) food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome, 3 (4.3%) milk protein-induced proctocolitis syndrome, and 3 (4.3%) celiac disease. Thirty subjects (43.5%) avoided foods due to PANS; elimination of gluten and dairy was most common and was associated with perceived improvement of PANS symptoms (by parents). This perceived improvement was not confirmed with objective data. The prevalence of allergic and immune-mediated food disorders in PANS is similar to the general population as reported in the literature, with the exception of AR that appears to be more prevalent in our PANS cohort. More research will be required to establish whether diet or allergies influence PANS symptoms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/ped.2018.0888DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6154445PMC
September 2018

Effect of Early and Prophylactic Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs on Flare Duration in Pediatric Acute-Onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome: An Observational Study of Patients Followed by an Academic Community-Based Pediatric Acute-Onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome Clinic.

J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol 2017 Sep 11;27(7):619-628. Epub 2017 Jul 11.

1 Division of Pediatrics, Department of Allergy, Immunology, & Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine , Palo Alto, California.

Introduction: Pediatric Acute-onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome (PANS) is characterized by the sudden onset of severe obsessive-compulsive symptoms and/or eating restriction along with at least two coinciding neuropsychiatric symptoms. When associated with group A Streptococcus, the syndrome is labeled Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorder Associated with Streptococcal infections (PANDAS). An abnormal immune response to infection and subsequent neuroinflammation is postulated to play an etiologic role. We evaluated the impact of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) treatment on flare duration in PANS/PANDAS.

Methods: Patient inclusion criteria: Patients were included if they had at least one neuropsychiatric deterioration ("flare") that met strict PANS/PANDAS research criteria and for which flare duration could be assessed. Flare inclusion criteria: Any flare that started before October 15, 2016 was included and followed until the flare resolved or until the end of our data collection (November 1, 2016). Flare exclusion criteria: Flares were excluded if they were incompletely resolved, treated with aggressive immunomodulation, or treated with NSAIDs late (>30 days of flare onset). Ninety-five patients met study inclusion criteria and collectively experienced 390 flares that met flare criteria. Data were analyzed using multilevel linear models, adjusting for demographics, disease, and treatment covariates.

Results: NSAID use was associated with a significantly shorter flare duration. Flares not treated with NSAIDs had a mean duration of approximately 12.2 weeks (95% CI: 9.3-15.1). Flares that occurred while the child was on NSAID maintenance therapy were approximately 4 weeks shorter than flares not managed with NSAIDs (95% CI: 1.85-6.24; p < 0.0001). Flares treated with NSAIDs within 30 days of flare onset were approximately 2.6 weeks shorter than flares not managed with NSAIDs (95% CI: 0.43-4.68; p = 0.02). Flares treated prophylactically and those treated early with NSAIDs did not differ in duration (p = 0.26). Among the flares that received NSAID treatment within the first 30 days, earlier intervention was modestly associated with shorter flare durations (i.e., for each day that NSAID treatment was delayed, flare duration increased by 0.18 weeks; 95% CI: 0.03-0.33; p = 0.02), though it was not statistically significant after controlling for covariates (p = 0.06).

Conclusion: NSAIDs given prophylactically or within 30 days of flare onset may shorten neuropsychiatric symptom duration in patients with new-onset and relapsing/remitting PANS and PANDAS. A randomized placebo-control clinical trial of NSAIDs in PANS is warranted to formally assess treatment efficacy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cap.2016.0193DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5749580PMC
September 2017