Publications by authors named "Katsumi Otani"

12 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

High Serum Adiponectin Level Is a Risk Factor for Anemia in Japanese Men: A Prospective Observational Study of 1,029 Japanese Subjects.

PLoS One 2016 5;11(12):e0165511. Epub 2016 Dec 5.

Department of Neurosurgery, Yamagata University School of Medicine, Yamagata City, Yamagata, Japan.

Erythroid abnormalities including anemia and polycythemia are often observed in the general clinical setting. Because recent studies reported that adiponectin negatively affects hematopoiesis, we performed a prospective observational study to assess the relationship between anemia and adiponectin, as well as other parameters, in 1029 Japanese subjects (477 men and 552 women) 40 years of age and older. Body measurements, blood tests, and nutrition intake studies were performed at baseline, and 5 to 7 years later (follow-up). Hemoglobin (Hb) and hematocrit (Hct) levels in men with high serum adiponectin levels were lower at follow-up than at baseline. Multiple regression analysis showed that age, body mass index, adiponectin, and glutamic-pyruvic transaminase were significantly associated with erythroid-related variables (red blood cells, Hb, and Hct) in both men and women (P <0.05). In a logistic regression analysis, adiponectin, fasting blood glucose, and β-natriuretic peptide were significant risk factors for anemia in men, and blood urea nitrogen and amylase were significant risk factors in women. Physical features and nutrient intake were not risk factors for anemia. Our study demonstrates, both clinically and epidemiologically, that a high serum adiponectin level decreases the amounts of erythroid-related variables and is a risk factor for anemia in Japanese men.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0165511PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5137881PMC
July 2017

Circulating miR-223 in Oral Cancer: Its Potential as a Novel Diagnostic Biomarker and Therapeutic Target.

PLoS One 2016 21;11(7):e0159693. Epub 2016 Jul 21.

Department of Dentistry and Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Yamagata University Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata, Japan.

Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) have been detected in various types of cancer and have been proposed as novel biomarkers for diagnosis and treatment. Until recently, however, no studies had comprehensively examined circulating miRNAs in oral cancer. The current study used an ultra-sensitive genome-wide miRNA array to investigate changes in circulating miRNAs in plasma from five patients with oral cancer and ten healthy individuals. Results indicated that there were only a few circulating miRNAs, including miR-223, miR-26a, miR-126, and miR-21, that were up-regulated in patients with oral cancer. A subsequent validation test indicated that circulating miR-223 levels were significantly higher (~2-fold, P< 0.05) in patients with oral cancer (n = 31) than in those without cancer (n = 31). Moreover, miR-223 was found to be up-regulated in tumor-adjacent normal tissue compared to tumor tissue from patients with oral cancer. A gain-of-function assay was performed to explore the potential roles of circulating miR-223 in the development of oral cancer. Results revealed that miR-223 functions as a tumor suppressor by inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis. In conclusion, this study suggested that circulating miR-223 may serve as a potential biomarker for diagnosis and that it may represent a novel therapeutic target for treatment of oral cancer.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0159693PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4956265PMC
July 2017

Gene-environment interactions in obesity: implication for future applications in preventive medicine.

J Hum Genet 2016 Apr 10;61(4):317-22. Epub 2015 Dec 10.

Department of Advanced Cancer Science, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Yamagata, Japan.

Obesity is associated with environmental factors; however, information about gene-environment interactions is lacking. We aimed to elucidate the effects of gene-environment interactions on obesity, specifically between genetic predisposition and various obesity-related lifestyle factors, using data from a population-based prospective cohort study. The genetic risk score (GRS) calculated from East Asian ancestry single-nucleotide polymorphisms was significantly associated with the body mass index (BMI) at baseline (P<0.001). Significant gene-environment interactions were observed for six nutritional factors, alcohol intake, metabolic equivalents-hour per day and the homeostasis model assessment ratio. The GRS altered the effects of lifestyle factors on BMI. Increases in the BMI at baseline per unit intake for each nutritional factor differed depending on the GRS. However, we did not observe significant correlations between the GRS and annual changes in BMI during the follow-up period. This study suggests that the effects of lifestyle factors on obesity differ depending on the genetic risk factors. The approach used to evaluate gene-environment interaction in this study may be applicable to the practice of preventive medicine.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/jhg.2015.148DOI Listing
April 2016

Applying data envelopment analysis to preventive medicine: a novel method for constructing a personalized risk model of obesity.

PLoS One 2015 14;10(5):e0126443. Epub 2015 May 14.

Department of Neurosurgery, Yamagata University Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata, Japan.

Data envelopment analysis (DEA) is a method of operations research that has not yet been applied in the field of obesity research. However, DEA might be used to evaluate individuals' susceptibility to obesity, which could help establish effective risk models for the onset of obesity. Therefore, we conducted this study to evaluate the feasibility of applying DEA to predict obesity, by calculating efficiency scores and evaluating the usefulness of risk models. In this study, we evaluated data from the Takahata study, which was a population-based cohort study (with a follow-up study) of Japanese people who are >40 years old. For our analysis, we used the input-oriented Charnes-Cooper-Rhodes model of DEA, and defined the decision-making units (DMUs) as individual subjects. The inputs were defined as (1) exercise (measured as calories expended) and (2) the inverse of food intake (measured as calories ingested). The output was defined as the inverse of body mass index (BMI). Using the β coefficients for the participants' single nucleotide polymorphisms, we then calculated their genetic predisposition score (GPS). Both efficiency scores and GPS were available for 1,620 participants from the baseline survey, and for 708 participants from the follow-up survey. To compare the strengths of the associations, we used models of multiple linear regressions. To evaluate the effects of genetic factors and efficiency score on body mass index (BMI), we used multiple linear regression analysis, with BMI as the dependent variable, GPS and efficiency scores as the explanatory variables, and several demographic controls, including age and sex. Our results indicated that all factors were statistically significant (p < 0.05), with an adjusted R2 value of 0.66. Therefore, it is possible to use DEA to predict environmentally driven obesity, and thus to establish a well-fitted model for risk of obesity.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0126443PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4431757PMC
February 2016

Applying spatial epidemiology to hematological disease using R: a guide for hematologists and oncologists.

J Blood Med 2014 5;5:31-6. Epub 2014 Mar 5.

Department of Neurology, Hematology, Metabolism, Endocrinology, and Diabetology, Yamagata University School of Medicine, Yamagata, Japan.

"Spatial statistics" is an academic field that deals with the statistical analysis of spatial data, and has been applied to econometrics and various other policy fields. These methods are easily applied by hematologists and oncologists using better and much less expensive software. To encourage physicians to use these methods, this review introduces the methods and demonstrates the analyses using R and FleXScan, which can be freely downloaded from the website, with sample data. It is demonstrated that spatial analysis can be used by physicians to analyze hematological diseases. In addition, applying the technique presented to the investigation of patient prognoses may enable generation of data that are also useful for solving health policy-related problems, such as the optimal distribution of medical resources.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/JBM.S57944DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3949695PMC
June 2014

Cancer patients on Twitter: a novel patient community on social media.

BMC Res Notes 2012 Dec 27;5:699. Epub 2012 Dec 27.

Department of Medical Informatics, Graduate School of Medical Science,Yamagata University, Yamagata, Japan.

Background: Patients increasingly turn to the Internet for information on medical conditions, including clinical news and treatment options. In recent years, an online patient community has arisen alongside the rapidly expanding world of social media, or "Web 2.0." Twitter provides real-time dissemination of news, information, personal accounts and other details via a highly interactive form of social media, and has become an important online tool for patients. This medium is now considered to play an important role in the modern social community of online, "wired" cancer patients.

Results: Fifty-one highly influential "power accounts" belonging to cancer patients were extracted from a dataset of 731 Twitter accounts with cancer terminology in their profiles. In accordance with previously established methodology, "power accounts" were defined as those Twitter accounts with 500 or more followers. We extracted data on the cancer patient (female) with the most followers to study the specific relationships that existed between the user and her followers, and found that the majority of the examined tweets focused on greetings, treatment discussions, and other instances of psychological support. These findings went against our hypothesis that cancer patients' tweets would be centered on the dissemination of medical information and similar "newsy" details.

Conclusions: At present, there exists a rapidly evolving network of cancer patients engaged in information exchange via Twitter. This network is valuable in the sharing of psychological support among the cancer community.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1756-0500-5-699DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3599295PMC
December 2012

Proposed vector candidate: Leptotrombidium palpale for Shimokoshi type Orientia tsutsugamushi.

Microbiol Immunol 2013 Feb;57(2):111-7

Department of Microbiology, Yamagata Prefectural Institute of Public Health, 1-6-6 Toka-machi, Yamagata-shi, Yamagata 990-0031, Japan.

To identify the vector species for Shimokoshi type Orientia tsutsugamushi, a survey of larval trombiculid mites was conducted in Yamagata Prefecture, Japan from April to May 2012. In all, 2889 larval trombiculid mites were obtained from 21 Apodemus speciosus rodent hosts, 2600 of which were morphologically classified into eight species in three genera. After screening of O. tsutsugamushi DNA in individual larval trombiculid mites using real-time PCR targeting the 16S ribosomal RNA gene, serotype-specific nested PCRs targeting the 56 kDa protein gene were performed, followed by sequencing analysis. As a result, Shimokoshi type O. tsutsugamushi DNA was identified from 3 (1.9%) of 157 Leptotrombidium palpale. This is the first study to identify Shimokoshi type O. tsutsugamushi DNA in L. palpale. The results indicate that L. palpale is a possible vector for Shimokoshi type O. tsutsugamushi.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1348-0421.12015DOI Listing
February 2013

[Sequence analysis subtyping of the 56-kDa protein-encoding gene of Karp-type Orientia tsutsugamushi isolated in scrub typhus cases].

Kansenshogaku Zasshi 2011 Nov;85(6):626-31

Yamagata Prefectural Institute of Public Health.

To determine the Karp-type Orientia tsutsugamushi subtype in northern Japan, i.e., Yamagata, Niigata, and Akita Prefectures, we analyzed the partial nucleotide sequence of the 56-kDa protein-encoding gene of 30 isolates from scrub typhus cases. Based on sequencing results, we classified isolates into two groups of 27 and 3 isolates. Nucleotide sequences of 27 isolates were homologous to the yeo-joo strain, classified as a JP-1 subtype. The three isolates were each homologous to a stain of CMM1, KNP1, or KNP2, classified as JP-2 subtypes. Phylogenetic tree analysis showed the 27 isolates forming a cluster with the yeo-joo strain and the three isolates with the CMM, KNP1, and KNP2 strains and therefore belonging to these subtypes. The Karp-type O. tsutsugamushi JP-2 subtype predominates in Japan, the JP-1 subtype probably the predominates in the area investigated. O. tsutsugamushi JP-1 subtype strains must therefore be isolated from subjects in this area and comprehensively studied.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.11150/kansenshogakuzasshi.85.626DOI Listing
November 2011

Relationship between dietary intake and microalbuminuria: findings from the Takahata study.

Clin Exp Nephrol 2012 Feb 4;16(1):147-55. Epub 2011 Oct 4.

Department of Public Health, Yamagata University Graduate School of Medicine, Yamagata, Japan.

Background: Although several studies have investigated the relationship between dietary nutrient intake and microalbuminuria, no study of an Asian population has been reported. The present study investigates the relationship between dietary intake and microalbuminuria in a general Japanese population.

Methods: We analyzed 675 men and 924 women who did not have diabetes. Participants who had a urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) ≥300 mg/g, who did not complete a questionnaire regarding food frequency and who did not provide complete urine measurements were excluded. Nutrient intake was assessed by validated food frequency questionnaire. Microalbuminuria was defined as UACR ≥30 mg/g. The relationship between dietary nutrient intake and microalbuminuria was examined using a multiple logistic regression model adjusted for age, total energy intake, body mass index, smoking status, systolic blood pressure and use of antihypertensive medication.

Results: No significant association was observed among the men. The multiple adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) of having microalbuminuria per 1 standard deviation increase in total protein (%kcal), animal protein (%kcal), animal protein (g/day), animal fat, niacin, carbohydrate and β-cryptoxanthin among the women were 1.33 (1.07-1.66), 1.35 (1.09-1.66), 1.42 (1.08-1.88), 1.29 (1.05-1.59), 1.28 (1.04-1.57), 0.73 (0.58-0.92) and 0.76 (0.59-0.996), respectively. The multiple adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of having microalbuminuria in the highest quintile of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids compared with the lowest was 2.16 (1.03-4.54).

Conclusion: Less animal protein and more β-cryptoxanthin in the diet might help to prevent microalbuminuria. Prospective studies including controlled trials are required to confirm this conclusion.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10157-011-0539-5DOI Listing
February 2012

[Occurrence of Tsutsugamushi disease infection by Orientia tsutsugamushi, Kawasaki serotype, in Yamagata Prefecture, Japan].

Kansenshogaku Zasshi 2009 Sep;83(5):496-9

Yamagata Prefectural Institute of Public Health.

Of 95 Tsutsugamushi disease case occurring in Yamagata prefecture from 1999 to 2006, four-all women-involved the O. tsutsugamushi Kawasaki serotype. The three major symptoms were fever, exanthema, and eschar present from mid-October to early November. Serodiagnosis by indirect immunofluoresence assay showed elevated IgG and IgM antibody titers against the Kawasaki serotype antigen, with IgM higher than IgG. Nested PCR detected 56-kDa DNA in three of the cases. DNA was amplified in Kawasaki-specific PCR. Two cases for which sequencing was done using nested PCR-amplified DNA showed an identity of 99.8% for the Kawasaki strain (Accession number: M63383). These results confirmed the occurrence of Tsutsugamushi disease infection involving Kawasaki serotype in Yamagata prefecture.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.11150/kansenshogakuzasshi.83.496DOI Listing
September 2009

[Legionella contamination risk factors in non-circulating hot spring water].

Kansenshogaku Zasshi 2009 Jan;83(1):36-44

Ehime Prefectural Institute of Public Health and Environmental Science.

We examined water from 182 non-circulating hot spring bathing facilities in Japan for possible Legionella occurrence from June 2005 to December 2006, finding Legionella-positive cultures in 119 (29.5%) of 403 samples. Legionellae occurrence was most prevalent in bathtub water (39.4%), followed by storage tank water (23.8%), water from faucets at the bathtub edge (22.3%), and source-spring water (8.3%), indicating no statistically significant difference, in the number of legionellae, having an overall mean of 66 CFU/100mL. The maximum number of legionellae in water increased as water was sampled downstream:180 CFU/100 mL from source spring, 670 from storage tanks, 4,000 from inlet faucets, and 6,800 from bathtubs. The majority--85.7%--of isolated species were identified as L. pneumophila : L. pneumophila serogroup (SG) 1 in 22%, SG 5 in 21%, and SG 6 in 22% of positive samples. Multivariate logistic regression models used to determine the characteristics of facilities and sanitary management associated with Legionella contamination indicated that legionellae was prevalent in bathtub water under conditions where it was isolated from inlet faucet/pouring gate water (odds ratio [OR] = 6.98, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.14 to 22.8). Risk of occurrence was also high when the bathtub volume exceeded 5 m3 (OR = 2.74, 95% CI = 1.28 to 5.89). Legionellae occurrence was significantly reduced when the bathing water pH was lower than 6.0 (OR = 0.12, 95% CI = 0.02 to 0.63). Similarly, occurrence was rare in inlet faucet water or the upper part of the plumbing system for which pH was lower than 6.0 (OR = 0.06, 95% CI = 0.01 to 0.48), and when the water temperature was maintained at 55 degrees C or more (OR = 0.10, 95% CI = 0.01 to 0.77). We also examined the occurrence of amoeba, Mycobacterium spp., Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus in water samples.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.11150/kansenshogakuzasshi.83.36DOI Listing
January 2009

[Nosocomial infection caused by multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus with reduced susceptibility to vancomycin and teicoplanin.--Yamagata Prefecture, Japan; May 2004-Jun 2005].

Kansenshogaku Zasshi 2007 Mar;81(2):183-8

Department of Pharmacy, Yamagata Prefectural Shinjo Hospital.

Nosocomial infection caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) occurred at a major in Yamagata prefecture hospital between May 2004 and June 2005. We studied pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns, antimicrobial susceptibility patterns, and bacteriological features, such as coaglase type for eight isolates, including two of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE). Our results suggest that this case was caused by a single strain of multidrug-resistant S. aureus. These 8 clinical isolates indicated reduced susceptibility to vancomycin and teicoplanin. PCR assay results for detection of the staphylococcal vanA, vanB, and vanC gene were all negative as all isolates. In transmission electron microscopy, cell walls appeared thicker than those of a susceptible strain from food poisoning. MRSA with reduced susceptibility to glycopeptide antibiotics may not be treated successfully with vancomycin or teicoplanin, making it important to closely observe MRSA with reduced susceptibility to glycopeptide antibiotics.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.11150/kansenshogakuzasshi1970.81.183DOI Listing
March 2007